References of "Tabruyn, Sébastien"
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See detailMicroRNA-146a is a causative factor and a specific biomarker for peripartum cardiomyopathy
Halkein, Julie ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Haghikia, Arash et al

Poster (2012, April)

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See detailMiR-146a an angiostatic miRNA elevated in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Halkein, Julie ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Haghikia, Arash et al

Poster (2012, January)

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See detailMicroRNA-146a, a downstream effector of 16kDa prolactin, impairs the endothelium-cardiomyocyte cross-talk in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Struman, Ingrid ULg; Halkein, Julie ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg et al

in FASEB meeting:the Growth Hormone/Prolactin Family in Biology and Disease. (2012)

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See detailThe Antiangiogenic 16K Prolactin Impairs Functional Tumor Neovascularization by Inhibiting Vessel Maturation
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Berndt, Sarah et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(11), 27318-27318

Background: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, plays an essential role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. 16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal ... [more ▼]

Background: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, plays an essential role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. 16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin was shown to prevent tumor growth and metastasis by modifying tumor vessel morphology. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we investigated the effect of 16K hPRL on tumor vessel maturation and on the related signaling pathways. We show that 16K hPRL treatment leads, in a murine B16-F10 tumor model, to a dysfunctional tumor vasculature with reduced pericyte coverage, and disruption of the PDGF-B/PDGFR-B, Ang/Tie2, and Delta/Notch pathways. In an aortic ring assay, 16K hPRL impairs endothelial cell and pericyte outgrowth from the vascular ring. In addition, 16K hPRL prevents pericyte migration to endothelial cells. This event was independent of a direct inhibitory effect of 16K hPRL on pericyte viability, proliferation, or migration. In endothelial cell-pericyte cocultures, we found 16K hPRL to disturb Notch signaling. Conclusions/Significance: Taken together, our data show that 16K hPRL impairs functional tumor neovascularization by inhibiting vessel maturation and for the first time that an endogenous antiangiogenic agent disturbs Notch signaling. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of 16K hPRL action and highlight its potential for use in anticancer therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailThe antiangiogenic 16K prolactin disturbs functional tumor neovascularization by affecting vessel maturation
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Berndt, Sarah et al

Poster (2011, May)

16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin was shown to prevent tumor growth and metastasis by modifying tumor vessel morphology. Here we investigated the effect of 16K ... [more ▼]

16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin was shown to prevent tumor growth and metastasis by modifying tumor vessel morphology. Here we investigated the effect of 16K hPRL on tumor vessel maturation and on the related signaling pathways. We show that 16K hPRL treatment leads, in a murine B16-F10 tumor model, to a dysfunctional tumor vasculature with reduced pericyte coverage, and disruption of the PDGF-B/PDGFR-B, Ang/Tie2, and Delta/Notch pathways. In an aortic ring assay, 16K hPRL impairs endothelial cell and pericyte outgrowth from the vascular ring. In addition, 16K hPRL prevents pericyte migration to endothelial cells. This event was independent of a direct inhibitory effect of 16K hPRL on pericyte viability, proliferation, or migration. In endothelial cell-pericyte cocultures, we found 16K hPRL to disturb Notch signaling, this being the first time such an effect is observed with an endogenous antiangiogenic agent. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of 16K hPRL action and highlight its potential for use in anticancer therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailMir-146a : A new angiostatic miRNA with tumor-suppressive properties
Halkein, Julie ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Malvaux, Ludovic et al

Poster (2011, March)

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See detailMiR-146a an angiostatic miRNA elevated in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Halkein, Julie ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Malvaux, Ludovic et al

Poster (2011, March)

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See detailMiR-146a: an angiostatic miRNA with tumor-suppressive properties
Halkein, Julie ULg; Bovy, Nicolas ULg; Castermans, Karolien et al

Poster (2011, February)

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See detailMiR-146a an angiostatic miRNA elevated in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Halkein, Julie ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Malvaux, Ludovic et al

Poster (2011, February)

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See detailMiR-146a an angiostatic miRNA elevated in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Halkein, Julie ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Malvaux, Ludovic et al

Poster (2011, January)

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See detailPericyte requirement for anti-leak action of angiopoietin-1 and vascular remodeling in sustained inflammation
Fuxe, J.; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Colton, K. et al

in American Journal of Pathology (2011), 178(6), 2897-909

Blood vessel leakiness is an early, transient event in acute inflammation but can also persist as vessels undergo remodeling in sustained inflammation. Angiopoietin/Tie2 signaling can reduce the leakiness ... [more ▼]

Blood vessel leakiness is an early, transient event in acute inflammation but can also persist as vessels undergo remodeling in sustained inflammation. Angiopoietin/Tie2 signaling can reduce the leakiness through changes in endothelial cells. The role of pericytes in this action has been unknown. We used the selective PDGF-B-blocking oligonucleotide aptamer AX102 to determine whether disruption of pericyte-endothelial crosstalk alters vascular leakiness or remodeling in the airways of mice under four different conditions: i) baseline, ii) acute inflammation induced by bradykinin, iii) sustained inflammation after 7-day infection by the respiratory pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis, or iv) leakage after bradykinin challenge in the presence of vascular stabilization by the angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) mimic COMP-Ang1 for 7 days. AX102 reduced pericyte coverage but did not alter the leakage of microspheres from tracheal blood vessels at baseline or after bradykinin; however, AX102 exaggerated leakage at 7 days after M. pulmonis infection and increased vascular remodeling and disease severity at 14 days. AX102 also abolished the antileakage effect of COMP-Ang1 at 7 days. Together, these findings show that pericyte contributions to endothelial stability have greater dependence on PDGF-B during the development of sustained inflammation, when pericyte dynamics accompany vascular remodeling, than under baseline conditions or in acute inflammation. The findings also show that the antileakage action of Ang1 requires PDGF-dependent actions of pericytes in maintaining endothelial stability. [less ▲]

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See detailAspects moléculaires du cancer du sein triple négatif et les implications thérapeutiques
COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg; Struman, Ingrid ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 393-396

Detailed reference viewed: 159 (28 ULg)
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See detailMir-146a : A new angiostatic miRNA with tumor-suppressive properties
Halkein, Julie ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Malvaux, Ludovic et al

Poster (2010, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
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See detailmiR-146a: an anti-angiogenic miRNA regulated by NF-kB
Halkein, Julie ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Malvaux, Ludovic et al

Poster (2010, May 21)

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See detailSprouty1, a new target of the angiostatic agent 16K prolactin, negatively regulates angiogenesis
Sabatel, Céline ULg; Cornet, Anne ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg et al

in Molecular Cancer (2010), 9(1), 231

BACKGROUND:Disorganized angiogenesis is associated with several pathologies, including cancer. The identification of new genes that control tumor neovascularization can provide novel insights for future ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND:Disorganized angiogenesis is associated with several pathologies, including cancer. The identification of new genes that control tumor neovascularization can provide novel insights for future anti-cancer therapies. Sprouty1 (SPRY1), an inhibitor of the MAPK pathway, might be one of these new genes. We identified SPRY1 by comparing the transcriptomes of untreated endothelial cells with those of endothelial cells treated by the angiostatic agent 16K prolactin (16K hPRL). In the present study, we aimed to explore the potential function of SPRY1 in angiogenesis.RESULTS:We confirmed 16K hPRL induced up-regulation of SPRY1 in primary endothelial cells. In addition, we demonstrated the positive SPRY1 regulation in a chimeric mouse model of human colon carcinoma in which 16K hPRL treatment was shown to delay tumor growth. Expression profiling by qRT-PCR with species-specific primers revealed that induction of SPRY1 expression by 16K hPRL occurs only in the (murine) endothelial compartment and not in the (human) tumor compartment. The regulation of SPRY1 expression was NF-kappaB dependent. Partial SPRY1 knockdown by RNA interference protected endothelial cells from apoptosis as well as increased endothelial cell proliferation, migration, capillary network formation, and adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. SPRY1 knockdown was also shown to affect the expression of cyclinD1 and p21 both involved in cell-cycle regulation. These findings are discussed in relation to the role of SPRY1 as an inhibitor of ERK/MAPK signaling and to a possible explanation of its effect on cell proliferation.CONCLUSIONS:Taken together, these results suggest that SPRY1 is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. [less ▲]

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See detailAngiopoietin-2-Driven Vascular Remodeling in Airway Inflammation
Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Colton, K.; Morisada, T. et al

in American Journal of Pathology (2010)

Vascular remodeling is a feature of chronic inflammation during which capillaries transform into venules that expand the region of the vasculature in which leakage and leukocyte emigration both occur ... [more ▼]

Vascular remodeling is a feature of chronic inflammation during which capillaries transform into venules that expand the region of the vasculature in which leakage and leukocyte emigration both occur. Recently, we found that angiopoietin/Tie2 receptor signaling drives the transformation of capillaries into venules at an early stage of the sustained inflammatory response in the airways of mice infected with Mycoplasma pulmonis. However, the precise contributions of both angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and angiopoietin-2 (Ang2) are not clear. In this study, we sought to determine the contribution of Ang2 to this vascular remodeling. Ang2 mRNA expression levels increased and phosphorylated Tie2 immunoreactivity in mucosal blood vessels decreased, indicative of diminished receptor signaling after infection. Selective inhibition of Ang2 throughout the infection by administration of either of two distinct function-blocking antibodies reduced the suppression of Tie2 phosphorylation and decreased the remodeling of mucosal capillaries into venules, the amount of leukocyte influx, and disease severity. These findings are consistent with Ang2 acting as an antagonist of Tie2 receptors and the reduction of Tie2 phosphorylation in endothelial cells rendering the vasculature more responsive to cytokines that promote both vascular remodeling and the consequences of inflammation after M. pulmonis infection. By blocking such changes, Ang2 inhibitors may prove beneficial in the treatment of sustained inflammation in which vascular remodeling, leakage, and leukocyte influx contribute to its pathophysiology. [less ▲]

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See detailAngiopoietin/Tie2 signaling transforms capillaries into venules primed for leukocyte trafficking in airway inflammation.
Fuxe, Jonas; Lashnits, Erin; O'Brien, Shaun et al

in American Journal of Pathology (2010), 176(4), 2009-18

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key angiogenic factor in tumors, but less is known about what drives vascular remodeling in inflammation, where plasma leakage and leukocyte influx are ... [more ▼]

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key angiogenic factor in tumors, but less is known about what drives vascular remodeling in inflammation, where plasma leakage and leukocyte influx are prominent features. In chronic airway inflammation in mice infected by the bacterium Mycoplasma pulmonis (M. pulmonis), the segment of the microvasculature that supports leukocyte adhesion and migration expands through remodeling of capillaries into vessels with features of venules. Here, we report that the angiopoietin/Tie2 pathway is an essential driving force for capillary remodeling into venules in M. pulmonis-infected mouse airways. Similar to M. pulmonis infection, systemic overexpression of angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) resulted in remodeling of airway capillaries into venular-like vessels that expressed venous markers like P-selectin, ICAM-1, and EphB4 and were sites of leukocyte adhesion during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute inflammation. Ang1 and Ang2 protein increased in M. pulmonis-infected mouse airways but came from different cellular sources: Ang1 was expressed in infiltrating neutrophils and Ang2 in endothelial cells. Indeed, systemic administration of soluble Tie2 inhibited capillary remodeling, induction of venous markers, and leukocyte influx in M. pulmonis-infected mouse airways. Together, these findings suggest that blockade of the Ang/Tie2 pathway may represent a therapeutic approach in airway inflammation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULg)