References of "Somja, Joan"
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See detailMosquito net for abdominal wall repair: a comparison of their chemical, physical, morphological and mechanical properties to commercial meshes
Sevrin, Chantal ULg; Nsadi Fwene, Berthier; Arung, Willy et al

in Biomedica proceedings (2013, June 23)

Meshes are the actual standard in abdominal wall repair. Commercial medical meshes are however either unavailable or unaffordable too expensive for developing countries. Therefore in most resource-poor ... [more ▼]

Meshes are the actual standard in abdominal wall repair. Commercial medical meshes are however either unavailable or unaffordable too expensive for developing countries. Therefore in most resource-poor developing countries a traditional sutured repair is still commonplace although with significantly inferior results. Sterilized mosquito nets have been recently roposed by several authors to replace medical meshes in low-income countries . However in the perspective of their clinical use a better understanding of this mosquito net is obviously requested both in terms of material properties and of in vivo biocompatibility. [less ▲]

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See detailINFUSION OF THIRD-PARTY MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS (MSC) AFTER KIDNEY AND LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: A PHASE I-II, OPEN-LABEL, CLINICAL STUDY (EudraCT 2011-001822-81 & NCT01429038)
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

Poster (2013, May 30)

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC ... [more ▼]

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC infusion after cadaveric kidney and liver transplantation in a prospective phase I-II study, taking advantage of our centre expertise and experience in MSC use in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation and using an already functioning GMP-compliant laboratory producing clinical-grade MSC. Secondary end-points will help to evaluate the immunosuppressive potential of MSC after organ transplantation, and the opportunity to develop larger randomised, controlled, phase III trials. After successful transplantation, 10 liver and 10 kidney transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (tacrolimus, MMF, steroids) will receive an intravenous infusion of 1.5-3x106/kg of third-party MSC on post-operative day 3±2. These patients will be prospectively compared to 10 liver and 10 kidney recipients who meet the inclusion criteria but deny MSC infusion. Safety will be assessed by recording side effects, including opportunistic infections and cancers. Immunosuppressive potential will be evaluated by rejection episode rates, by graft/patient survivals, by immunohistology of 3-months kidney and 6-month liver graft biopsies and by in vitro evaluation of the immunity profile of the recipients. In a second step, reduction (kidney) and progressive weaning (liver) of immunosuppression will be attempted in recipients who received MSC. This ongoing study is supported by research grants from the CHU of Liège, University of Liège, and by the Senior Clinical Research Grant from ESOT. The first patients were included and treated in early 2012, and final results expected in late 2013. [less ▲]

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See detail18F-FDG Uptake Assessed by PET/CT in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Is Associated with Cellular and Molecular Alterations Prefacing Wall Deterioration and Rupture.
Courtois, Audrey ULg; Richelle, Betty ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2013)

Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) leads to a significant morbidity and mortality in aging populations, and its prediction would be most beneficial to public health. Spots of positive uptake of ... [more ▼]

Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) leads to a significant morbidity and mortality in aging populations, and its prediction would be most beneficial to public health. Spots of positive uptake of 18F-FDG detected by PET are found in 12% of AAA patients (PET+), who are most often symptomatic and at high rupture risk. Comparing the 18F-FDG-positive site with a negative site from the same aneurysm and with samples collected from AAA patients with no 18F-FDG uptake should allow the discrimination of biologic alterations that would help in identifying markers predictive of rupture. METHODS: Biopsies of the AAA wall were obtained from patients with no 18F-FDG uptake (PET0, n = 10) and from PET+ patients (n = 8), both at the site of positive uptake and at a distant negative site of the aneurysmal wall. Samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and zymography. RESULTS: The sites of the aneurysmal wall with a positive 18F-FDG uptake were characterized by a strikingly increased number of adventitial inflammatory cells, highly proliferative, and by a drastic reduction of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media as compared with their negative counterpart and with the PET0 wall. The expression of a series of genes involved in the maintenance and remodeling of the wall was significantly modified in the negative sites of PET+, compared with the PET0 wall, suggesting a systemic alteration of the aneurysmal wall. Furthermore, a striking increase of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), notably the MMP1 and MMP13 collagenases, was observed in the positive sites, mainly in the adventitia. Moreover, PET+ patients were characterized by a higher circulating C-reactive protein. CONCLUSION: Positive 18F-FDG uptake in the aneurysmal wall is associated with an active inflammatory process characterized by a dense infiltrate of proliferating leukocytes in the adventitia and an increased circulating C-reactive protein. Moreover, a loss of SMC in the media and alterations of the expression of genes involved in the remodeling of adventitia and collagen degradation potentially participate in the weakening of the aneurysmal wall preceding rupture. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of CliniMACS (Myltenyi Biotec) Enriched Regulatory T Cells Delays Experimental Xenogeneic Graft-versus-Host Disease
Hannon, Muriel ULg; Lechanteur, C.; Somja, Joan ULg et al

in Belgian Journal of Hematology (2013), Abstracts book(Supplement of 28th General Meeting of the Belgian Hematological Society), 15

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See detailEchocardiographic integrated backscatter for detecting progression and regression of aortic valve calcifications in rats.
Roosens, Bram; Bala, Gezim; Gillis, Kris et al

in Cardiovascular Ultrasound (2013), 11(1), 4

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Calcification is an independent predictor of mortality in calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of non-invasive, non-ionizing ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Calcification is an independent predictor of mortality in calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of non-invasive, non-ionizing echocardiographic calibrated integrated backscatter (cIB) for monitoring progression and subsequent regression of aortic valvular calcifications in a rat model of reversible renal failure with CAVD, compared to histology. METHODS: 28 male Wistar rats were prospectively followed during 21 weeks. Group 1 (N=14) was fed with a 0.5% adenine diet for 9 weeks to induce renal failure and CAVD. Group 2 (N=14) received a standard diet. At week 9, six animals of each group were killed. The remaining animals of group 1 (N=8) and group 2 (N=8) were kept on a standard diet for an additional 12 weeks. cIB of the aortic valve was calculated at baseline, 9 and 21 weeks, followed by measurement of the calcified area (Ca Area) on histology. RESULTS: At week 9, cIB values and Ca Area of the aortic valve were significantly increased in the adenine-fed rats compared to baseline and controls. After 12 weeks of adenine diet cessation, cIB values and Ca Area of group 1 decreased compared to week 9, while there was no longer a significant difference compared to age-matched controls of group 2. CONCLUSIONS: cIB is a non-invasive tool allowing quantitative monitoring of CAVD progression and regression in a rat model of reversible renal failure, as validated by comparison with histology. This technique might become useful for assessing CAVD during targeted therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third party mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) after kidney and liver transplantation: a phase I-II, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

Conference (2012, October 19)

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC ... [more ▼]

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC infusion after cadaveric kidney and liver transplantation in a prospective phase I-II study, taking advantage of our centre expertise and experience in MSC use in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation and using an already functioning GMP-compliant laboratory producing clinical-grade MSC. Secondary end-points will help to evaluate the immunosuppressive potential of MSC after organ transplantation, and the opportunity to develop larger randomised, controlled, phase III trials. After successful transplantation, 10 liver and 10 kidney transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (tacrolimus, MMF, steroids) will receive an intravenous infusion of 1.5-3x106/kg of third-party MSC on post-operative day 3±2. These patients will be prospectively compared to 10 liver and 10 kidney recipients who meet the inclusion criteria but deny MSC infusion. Safety will be assessed by recording side effects, including opportunistic infections and cancers. Immunosuppressive potential will be evaluated by rejection episode rates, by graft/patient survivals, by immunohistology of 3-months kidney and 6-month liver graft biopsies and by in vitro evaluation of the immunity profile of the recipients. In a second step, reduction (kidney) and progressive weaning (liver) of immunosuppression will be attempted in recipients who received MSC. This ongoing study is supported by research grants from the CHU of Liège, University of Liège, and by the Senior Clinical Research Grant from ESOT. The first patients were included and treated in early 2012, and final results expected in late 2013. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging Guided Proteomics Unveils Heterogeniety in Colorectal Carcinoma Liver Metastases – Implications for Targeted Therapies.
blomme, Arnaud; Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Delvaux, David ULg et al

in Proceedings Giga Day 2012 (2012, May 04)

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See detailINTRA-TUMORAL HETEROGENEITY AND RATIONAL SELECTION OF ANTIGENS FOR TARGETED THERAPY OF LIVER METASTASES
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg; Delvaux, David ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8953

Objectives: Targeted therapies of liver metastases are gaining a major stake in current and future treatment options. However, the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Targeted therapies of liver metastases are gaining a major stake in current and future treatment options. However, the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer cells causing treatment resistance and relapse. Therefore, a rational strategy is needed to select targetable antigens that would overcome this intra-tumoral heterogeneity. Methods: After ethical committee approval, 48 fresh liver metastases of colorectal origin were prospectively collected from patients undergoing liver resection. Here we macroscopically divided the lesion in different zones and generated a unique quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in colorectal carcinoma liver metastases. Particular focus was laid on accessible proteins, a protein subclass comprising cell membrane associated and extracellular proteins. Accordingly, the tissues were ex-vivo biotinylated, affinity purified and analyzed for each zone separately using nano-UPLC-MSe proteomics technique. In total over 1500 unique proteins were statistically divided into different patterns of expression. Results: We have generated a quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in colorectal carcinoma liver metastases. The study offers insight into novel targets but also antigens against which the antibodies are already involved in clinical trials or treatment of liver metastases. Extensive clustering and validation experiments highlight novel markers that offer the potential to homogeneously cover the metastatic lesion and become better targets. Conclusions: Two such antigens, LTBP2 and TGFBI were selected for functional analysis in colorectal carcinoma cells. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that in particular TGFBI is relevant for migration and proliferation capacity of colorectal cancer cells. The suppression of this protein led to significant inhibition of tumor growth, crystalizing it as bona fide target for the development of anti-metastases therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailBarrett's metaplasia, dysplasia and esophageal ademnocarcinoma: an inadequate antitumour immunity?
Somja, Joan ULg; Demoulin, Stéphanie ULg; Herman, Ludivine et al

Conference (2012, February 09)

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See detailHuman papillomavirus DNA strongly correlates with a poorer prognosis in oral cavity carcinoma.
Duray, A; Descamps, G; Decaestecker, C et al

in Laryngoscope (2012), 122(7), 1558-65

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in a clinical series of 162 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was studied. Furthermore, we analyzed the correlation ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in a clinical series of 162 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was studied. Furthermore, we analyzed the correlation between the immunohistochemical expression of p16, p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and HPV status to predict survival in OSCC patients. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. METHODS: Paraffin-embedded samples from OSCC patients (n = 162) were evaluated for the presence of HPV DNA using both GP5+/GP6+ consensus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and type-specific E6/E7 PCR to detect HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, 67, and 68. Immunohistochemical staining for p16, p53, and EGFR was also performed. RESULTS: The type-specific E6/E7 PCR demonstrated that 65 of the 147 OSCC patients (44%) presented with high-risk (hr) HPV types and that 38 of the 147 OSCC patients (26%) presented with low-risk (lr) HPV types. Comparable p53 and EGFR expression levels were observed in the hr HPV+ group (41.5% p53+, 92% EGFR+) and the lr HPV+ group (57% p53+, 92% EGFR+). Conversely, a slight increase in the proportion of p16+ tumors was observed in the hr HPV+ group (65%) compared with the lr HPV+ group (44%). In regard to patient outcome, the presence of HPV was correlated with a worse prognosis (P = .007). CONCLUSIONS: A high prevalence of hr and lr HPV infections was detected in the OSCC patients included in the study. Moreover, hr HPV positivity was correlated with a decreased 5-year disease-free survival rate compared with HPV- and lr HPV+. [less ▲]

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See detailThe c-jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-binding Protein (JNKBP1) Acts as a Negative Regulator of NOD2 Protein Signaling by Inhibiting Its Oligomerization Process
Lecat, Aurore ULg; Di Valentin, Emmanuel ULg; Somja, Joan ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2012), 287(35), 29213-26

NOD2 is one of the best characterized member of the cytosolic NOD-like receptors (NLR) family. NOD2 is able to sense muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a specific bacterial cell wall component, and to subsequently ... [more ▼]

NOD2 is one of the best characterized member of the cytosolic NOD-like receptors (NLR) family. NOD2 is able to sense muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a specific bacterial cell wall component, and to subsequently induce various signalling pathways leading to NF- kappaB activation and autophagy, both events contributing to an efficient innate and adaptative immune response. Interestingly, loss-of-function nod2 variants were associated with a higher susceptibility for Crohn ' s disease (CD), which highlights the physiological importance of proper regulation of NOD2 activity. We performed a biochemical screen to search for new NOD2 regulators. We identified a new NOD2 partner, c-jun N-terminal kinase binding protein 1 (JNKBP1), a scaffold protein characterized by a N-terminal WD-40 domain. JNKBP1, through its WD-40 domain, binds to NOD2 following MDP activation. This interaction attenuates NOD2-mediated NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 secretion as well as NOD2 antibacterial activity. JNKBP1 exerts its repressor effect by disturbing NOD2 oligomerization and RIP2 tyrosine phosphorylation, both steps required for downstream NOD2 signalling. We furthermore showed that JNKBP1 and NOD2 are co-expressed in the human intestinal epithelium and immune cells recruited in the lamina propria, which suggests that JNKBP1 contributes to maintain NOD2-mediated intestinal immune homeostasis. [less ▲]

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See detailOccurrence of cardiovascular calcifications in normal, aging rats.
Roosens, B; Bala, G; Droogmans, S et al

in Experimental Gerontology (2012), 47(8), 614-9

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular calcification is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality and increases with age. Animal models are frequently used to investigate the underlying pathophysiology ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular calcification is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality and increases with age. Animal models are frequently used to investigate the underlying pathophysiology. Only scarce data regarding the effect of aging on calcifications in these animal models are available. The aim of this study is to investigate the occurrence of cardiovascular calcifications in normal, aging rats. METHODS: A mixed inbred/outbred population of 44 male Lewis/Wistar rats was studied. Group 1 of three-month-old rats, group 2 twelve-month-old, group 3 twenty-four-month-old and group 4 thirty-month-old rats. Calibrated integrated backscatter (cIB) values and blood parameters (creatinine, parathyroid hormone (PTH)) were measured, followed by ex-vivo micro-CT and histology as reference methods. RESULTS: Cardiovascular calcifications developed with age, as demonstrated by significantly increasing cIB values of the aortic valve and myocardium. This was confirmed by a significant increase in the calcified volume on ex-vivo micro-CT and in the histological calcium score. There was also a significantly higher level of creatinine and PTH with age. CONCLUSIONS: As in humans, cardiovascular calcifications progressively increase with age in the normal rat. Therefore the aging rat model could be used for studying calcifying cardiovascular disease. cIB might have a value in future studies for the early detection of subclinical calcifications in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of novel accessible proteins bearing diagnostic and therapeutic potential in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Musmeci, Davide; Wang, Yinghong et al

in Journal of Proteome Research (2011), 10(9), 4302-13

Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a deadly malignancy with poor early diagnostic and no effective therapy. Although several proteomic studies have performed comparative analysis between normal ... [more ▼]

Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a deadly malignancy with poor early diagnostic and no effective therapy. Although several proteomic studies have performed comparative analysis between normal and malignant tissues, there is a lack of clear characterization of proteins that could be of clinical value. Systemically reachable ("potentially accessible") proteins, suitable for imaging technologies and targeted therapies represent a major group of interest. The current study explores potentially accessible proteins overexpressed in PDAC, employing innovative proteomics technologies. In the discovery phase, potentially accessible proteins from fresh human normal and PDAC tissues were ex vivo biotinylated, isolated and identified using 2D-nano-HPLC-MS/MS method. The analysis revealed 422 up-regulated proteins in the tumor, of which 83 (including protein isoforms) were evaluated as potentially accessible. Eleven selected candidates were further confirmed as up-regulated using Western blot and multiple reaction monitoring protein quantification. Of these, transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI), latent transforming growth factor beta binding 2 (LTBP2), and asporin (ASPN) were further investigated by employing large scale immunohistochemistry-based validations. They were found to be significantly expressed in a large group of clinical PDAC samples compared to corresponding normal and inflammatory tissues. In conclusion, TGFBI, LTBP2, and ASPN are novel, overexpressed, and potentially accessible proteins in human PDAC. They bear the potential to be of clinical value for diagnostic and therapeutic applications and merit further studies using in vivo models. [less ▲]

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See detailCombined analysis of HPV DNA, p16, p21 and p53 to predict prognosis in patients with stage IV hypopharyngeal carcinoma.
Ernoux-Neufcoeur, P.; Arafa, M.; Decaestecker, C. et al

in Journal of Cancer Research & Clinical Oncology (2011), 137(1), 173-81

PURPOSE: We examined p16, p21 and p53 expression in combination with the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA as molecular markers to predict survival in patients with stage IV hypopharyngeal ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: We examined p16, p21 and p53 expression in combination with the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA as molecular markers to predict survival in patients with stage IV hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC). METHODS: Paraffin-embedded tumours from HSCC patients (n = 75) were evaluated for p16, p21 and p53 expression by immunohistochemistry. HPV DNA was detected by GP5+/6+ consensus PCR and subsequent genotyping by E6/E7 type-specific PCR for HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66 and 68. RESULTS: Among the 61 specimens that tested positive for the beta-globin, HPV typing identified 50 patients with high-risk (hr) HPV types. HPV 16E7 DNA was detected in 74% (37 cases) of these specimens. Twelve patients were found to be infected with multiple HPV types. However, the presence of hrHPV DNA was not found to correlate with the proportion of disease-free patients. The 5-year disease-free survival rate was 73% in p53- tumours versus 48% in p53+ tumours (P = 0.008). CONCLUSION: In our series of patients with stage IV HSCC, the hrHPV+ subgroup had a similar prognosis (in terms of recurrence risk) as the HPV- subgroup. p53 overexpression was associated with a worse prognosis. [less ▲]

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See detailLe cas clinique du mois. A propos d'un cas de sequestration pulmonaire intralobaire diagnostique a l'age adulte.
Somja, Joan ULg; de Leval, Laurence ULg; Boniver, Jacques ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(1), 7-12

Pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital lung malformation characterized by an abnormal segment of bronchopulmonary tissue supplied by aberrant systemic arteries. Due to the non-specific ... [more ▼]

Pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital lung malformation characterized by an abnormal segment of bronchopulmonary tissue supplied by aberrant systemic arteries. Due to the non-specific symptomatology, the diagnosis can be missed. Imaging is the cornerstone of the diagnosis. Complete surgical resection provides the definitive treatment. We report a case of pulmonary sequestration associated with an asymptomatic aspergillosis presenting during adulthood and describe briefly the epidemiology, embryology, histology, imaging and surgical treatment of this congenital abnormality. [less ▲]

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