References of "Sabatel, Céline"
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See detailSprouty1, a new target of the angiostatic agent 16K prolactin, negatively regulates angiogenesis
Sabatel, Céline ULg; Cornet, Anne ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg et al

in Molecular Cancer (2010), 9(1), 231

BACKGROUND:Disorganized angiogenesis is associated with several pathologies, including cancer. The identification of new genes that control tumor neovascularization can provide novel insights for future ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND:Disorganized angiogenesis is associated with several pathologies, including cancer. The identification of new genes that control tumor neovascularization can provide novel insights for future anti-cancer therapies. Sprouty1 (SPRY1), an inhibitor of the MAPK pathway, might be one of these new genes. We identified SPRY1 by comparing the transcriptomes of untreated endothelial cells with those of endothelial cells treated by the angiostatic agent 16K prolactin (16K hPRL). In the present study, we aimed to explore the potential function of SPRY1 in angiogenesis.RESULTS:We confirmed 16K hPRL induced up-regulation of SPRY1 in primary endothelial cells. In addition, we demonstrated the positive SPRY1 regulation in a chimeric mouse model of human colon carcinoma in which 16K hPRL treatment was shown to delay tumor growth. Expression profiling by qRT-PCR with species-specific primers revealed that induction of SPRY1 expression by 16K hPRL occurs only in the (murine) endothelial compartment and not in the (human) tumor compartment. The regulation of SPRY1 expression was NF-kappaB dependent. Partial SPRY1 knockdown by RNA interference protected endothelial cells from apoptosis as well as increased endothelial cell proliferation, migration, capillary network formation, and adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. SPRY1 knockdown was also shown to affect the expression of cyclinD1 and p21 both involved in cell-cycle regulation. These findings are discussed in relation to the role of SPRY1 as an inhibitor of ERK/MAPK signaling and to a possible explanation of its effect on cell proliferation.CONCLUSIONS:Taken together, these results suggest that SPRY1 is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. [less ▲]

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See detailAntiangiogenic liposomal gene therapy with 16K human prolactin efficiently reduces tumor growth.
Kinet, Virginie ULg; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Sabatel, Céline ULg et al

in Cancer Letters (2009), 284(2), 222-228

Human 16K PRL (16K hPRL) is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. It has been shown to prevent tumor growth in three xenograft mouse models. Here we have used a gene transfer ... [more ▼]

Human 16K PRL (16K hPRL) is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. It has been shown to prevent tumor growth in three xenograft mouse models. Here we have used a gene transfer method based on cationic liposomes to produce 16K hPRL and demonstrate that 16K hPRL inhibits tumor growth in a subcutaneous B16F10 mouse melanoma model. Computer-assisted image analysis shows that 16K hPRL treatment results in the reduction of tumor vessel length and width, leading to a 57% reduction in average vessel size. We thus show, for the first time, that administration of the 16K hPRL gene complexed to cationic liposomes is effective to maintain antiangiogenic activities of 16K hPRL level. [less ▲]

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See detailThe angiostatic 16K human prolactin overcomes endothelial cell anergy and promotes leukocyte infiltration via nuclear factor-kappaB activation
Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Sabatel, Céline ULg; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg et al

in Molecular Endocrinology (2007), 21(6), 1422-9

The 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent angiostatic factor that inhibits tumor growth in mouse models. Using microarray experiments, we have dissected how the endothelial ... [more ▼]

The 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent angiostatic factor that inhibits tumor growth in mouse models. Using microarray experiments, we have dissected how the endothelial-cell genome responds to 16K hPRL treatment. We found 216 genes that show regulation by 16K hPRL, of which a large proportion turned out to be associated with the process of immunity. 16K hPRL induces expression of various chemokines and endothelial adhesion molecules. These expressions, under the control of nuclear factor-kappaB, result in an enhanced leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction. Furthermore, analysis of B16-F10 tumor tissues reveals a higher expression of adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, or E-selectin) in endothelial cells and a significantly higher number of infiltrated leukocytes within the tumor treated with 16K hPRL compared with the untreated ones. In conclusion, this study describes a new antitumor mechanism of 16K hPRL. Because cellular immunity against tumor cells is a crucial step in therapy, the discovery that treatment with 16K hPRL overcomes tumor-induced anergy may become important for therapeutic perspectives. [less ▲]

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