References of "Rots, Veerle"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailWhat’s the difference? Results of a functional study of Aterian and Mousterian tools from the site of Ifri n’Ammar (Morocco)
Tomasso, Sonja ULg; Rots, Veerle ULg

Conference (2016, September 16)

Until today, the definition of the North African Mousterian has been based on a systematic comparison with the European Mousterian. Particularly the “Aterian” and its tanged tools have been widely ... [more ▼]

Until today, the definition of the North African Mousterian has been based on a systematic comparison with the European Mousterian. Particularly the “Aterian” and its tanged tools have been widely discussed. Researchers considered the tanged Aterian tools as early indications of the existence of hafting techniques [1]. It is currently not entirely understood how the Aterian relates to the Mousterian in North Africa, whether tanged tools can indeed be linked with hafting, and whether non-tanged tools were also hafted, which could indicate that a variety in hafting techniques existed. The site of Ifri n’Ammar presents an ideal chance to compare Aterian and Mousterian technocomplexes. The rock shelter is located in the eastern Moroccan Rif and has a rich and well preserved stratigraphy where Middle Paleolithic tools are abundantly represented [2]. At Ifri n’Ammar, the Aterian and Mousterian assemblages are inter-stratified, which means that the relationship of these industries cannot simply be explained in terms of chronological succession [2,3]. The density of retouched artefacts differs between the Aterian and the Mousterian levels and tanged tools are present in the denser Aterian levels only. These levels also show a higher overall tool frequency. We present the results of a functional study focusing on the artefacts from the upper levels (“Occupation supérieure”) of Ifri n’Ammar, dated between 83 ± 6 ka and 130 ± 8 ka [3]. The functional study was combined with a specific experimental program designed to address questions raised during the analysis of the archaeological material, with a specific focus on hafting. Diagnostic microscopic wear patterns confirm that the tanged tools were used while hafted. Tanged tools did not prove to be related to hunting activities only, but various tool uses could be identified. They all fit, however, within the context of hunting and animal processing activities. The reuse of hafted armatures for other activities is not evident in the present sample. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFiber technology, rope-making, textiles and the Lochstäbe from the Aurignacian of the Swabian Jura
Conard, Nicholas; Rots, Veerle ULg

Conference (2016, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDomestic tools, hafting, and the evolution of technology: The Upper Palaeolithic of Hohle Fels as a case study
Taipale, Noora ULg; Conard, Nicholas J.; Rots, Veerle ULg

Poster (2016, September)

Innovations relevant to human evolution often involve subsistence technology, which can affect the success of individual groups, and Homo sapiens in general. However, Palaeolithic technologies include ... [more ▼]

Innovations relevant to human evolution often involve subsistence technology, which can affect the success of individual groups, and Homo sapiens in general. However, Palaeolithic technologies include more than just hunting tools, and a proper understanding of hunter-gatherer ways of living requires knowledge of the organisation of diverse tasks and activities, including the manufacture and maintenance of tools and other equipment. One central aspect of technological evolution is the development of tool hafting [1, 2], which is not only restricted to hunting and gathering implements, but also affects so-called domestic tool categories. We present the results of an on-going project that focuses on hafting and use of stone tools in the Upper Palaeolithic through detailed functional analysis of selected assemblages from European key sites (Hohle Fels, Abri Pataud, Maisières-Canal), which have yielded rich lithic and organic assemblages from secure chronological contexts. Here the focus is on classic Upper Palaeolithic tool categories, such as endscrapers and burins, from the Gravettian and Magdalenian levels of the cave site Hohle Fels (Germany) [3, 4]. We suggest that domestic tools can offer a valuable source material, since for most of them, hafting is not a necessity as it is for spear and arrow tips. An increase in hafting implies an increase in time investment, which has implications for task organisation and specialisation. The Hohle Fels assemblage offers an interesting case study for temporal changes (or continuity) in the frequency and techniques of tool hafting. The projectile technology shows a clear shift from the Gravettian to the Magadalenian, marked by the introduction of a microlithic technology (backed bladelets). For other tool categories, the changes seem more subtle. Our goal is to characterise the tools used in manufacture and maintenance tasks, and to evaluate whether the Gravettian to Magdalenian transition witnesses changes in tool design and use that go beyond hunting equipment. The observed differences between tool classes and time periods are explained with a reference to details of tool use, such as the rate of edge wear development and stone tool exhaustion, as well as shifts in treatment of organic raw materials. The results suggest that domestic tools can aid in understanding long-term technological evolution, and create a baseline against which we can (re)assess the role of shifts observed in technologies that are more susceptible to morphological change, such as projectiles. References: [1] Rots, V., 2013. Insights into early Middle Palaeolithic tool use and hafting in Western Europe: The functional analysis of level IIa of the early Middle Palaeolithic site of Biache-Saint-Vaast (France). J. Archaeol. Sci. 40, 497–506. [2] Barham, L., 2013. From Hand to Handle: The First Industrial Revolution. Oxford University Press, Oxford. [3] Conard, N. J., Bolus, M., 2003. Radiocarbon dating the appearance of modern humans and timing of cultural innovations in Europe: New results and new challenges. J. Hum. Evol. 44, 331–371. [4] Taller, A., Bolus, M., Conard, N. J., 2014. The Magdalenian of Hohle Fels Cave and the Resettlement of the Swabian Jura after the LGM. In: Otte, M., Le Brun-Ricalens, F. (Eds.), Modes de contacts et de déplacements au Paléolithique eurasiatique: Actes du Colloque international de la commission 8 (Paléolithique supérieur) de l'UISPP, Université de Liège, 28–31 mai 2012. Centre National de Recherche Archéologique, Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (2 ULg)
See detailTime travelling into human prehistory using GC×GC-TOFMS
Perrault, Katelynn ULg; Dubois, Lena ULg; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues ULg et al

Scientific conference (2016, July 07)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCultural stratigraphy at Sibudu and its implications for our understanding of the MSA
Conard, Nicholas; Miller, Christopher; Rots, Veerle ULg et al

Conference (2016, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA New Approach for the Characterization of Organic Residues from Stone Tools Using GC×GC-TOFMS
Perrault, Katelynn ULg; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues ULg; Dubois, Lena ULg et al

in Separations (2016), 3(2), 16

Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have traditionally been used, in combination with other analyses, for the chemical characterization of ... [more ▼]

Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have traditionally been used, in combination with other analyses, for the chemical characterization of organic residues recovered from archaeological specimens. Recently in many life science fields, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) has provided numerous benefits over GC-MS. This study represents the first use of HS-SPME-GC×GC-TOFMS to characterize specimens from an experimental modern reference collection. Solvent extractions and direct analyses were performed on materials such as ivory, bone, antlers, animal tissue, human tissue, sediment, and resin. Thicker film column sets were preferred due to reduced column overloading. The samples analyzed by HS-SPME directly on a specimen appeared to give unique signatures and generally produced a higher response than for the solvent-extracted residues. A non-destructive screening approach of specimens may, therefore, be possible. Resin and beeswax mixtures prepared by heating for different lengths of time appeared to provide distinctly different volatile signatures, suggesting that GC×GC-TOFMS may be capable of differentiating alterations to resin in future studies. Further development of GC×GC-TOFMS methods for archaeological applications will provide a valuable tool to uncover significant information on prehistoric technological changes and cultural behavior. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMaking sense of residues on flaked stone artefacts: learning from blind tests
Rots, Veerle ULg; Hayes, Elspeth; Cnuts, Dries ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (9 ULg)
See detailGCxGC-TOFMS for the Investigation of Archeological Mysteries
Perrault, Katelynn ULg; Dubois, Lena ULg; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues ULg et al

Scientific conference (2016, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (4 ULg)
See detailImplications of spatial and temporal variation in point technology in KwaZulu-Natal during the MSA
Bader, Gregor; Porraz, Guillaume; Rots, Veerle ULg et al

Poster (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailProjectiles and hafting technology
Rots, Veerle ULg

in Iovita, Radu; Sano, Katsuhiro (Eds.) Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Stone Age Weaponry (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHunting with trapezes at Bazel-Sluis: the results of a functional analysis
Tomasso, Sonja ULg; Rots, Veerle ULg; Perdaen, Yves et al

in Notae Praehistoricae (2015), 35

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailBifacial serrated technology in the southern African Still Bay: new data from Sibudu Cave, Kwazulu-Natal
Schmid, Viola; Porraz, Guillaume; Rots, Veerle ULg et al

Conference (2015, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailNew excavations of the Later and Middle Stone Age layers at Bushman Rock Shelter, Limpopo Province, South Africa
Val, Aurore; Backwell, Lucinda; Brugal, Jean-Philip et al

Conference (2015, July 01)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIntroduction: Palaeolithic stone tool hafting
Rots, Veerle ULg

Scientific conference (2015, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (1 ULg)