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See detailExpression pattern of synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) isoforms in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis
CREVECOEUR, Julie ULg; Kaminski, RM; Rogister, Bernard ULg et al

in Neuropathology & Applied Neurobiology (in press)

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See detailThe small Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) response following eccentric exercise
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Simonet, Arnaud; Lacrosse, Zoé ULg et al

in Abstract Book GIGA Day 2014 (2014, January 27)

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See detailIsocinétisme et douleurs musculaires d’apparition retardée
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; ROGISTER, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Movement & Sport Sciences - Science & Motricité (2014)

The curative and preventive efficiency of the isokinetic exercise, especially of the eccentric contraction, has been well demonstrated. However, intense or unusual eccentric exercise is known to induce ... [more ▼]

The curative and preventive efficiency of the isokinetic exercise, especially of the eccentric contraction, has been well demonstrated. However, intense or unusual eccentric exercise is known to induce muscle damage associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and prolonged functional deficits. These negative consequences can frequently disturb the progress of re-education or training programmes. Since they can affect athletic performance and increase the risk of musculo-skeletal injuries, the structuro-functional alterations associated with DOMS may also be problematic in athletes. Therefore, to optimize the benefits of the eccentric work while avoiding muscle damage and occurrence of DOMS should represent a major objective for the practitioners. To date, the only systematic intervention that brings muscle protection against DOMS consists of performing repeated eccentric sessions at submaximal intensity. Besides its clinical use, isokinetic constitutes an interesting model to generate and investigate the DOMS phenomenon. The original association of eccentric injuring protocols with new emerging techniques of molecular biology appears to be a promising strategy to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying exercise-induced muscle damage. Such data would provide better guidelines for prevention or treatment practice. [less ▲]

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See detailSpinal Cord Injuries – How Could Adult Mesenchymal and Neural Crest Stem Cells Take Up the Challenge?
Neirinckx, Virginie ULg; CANTINIEAUX, Dorothée ULg; Coste, Cécile ULg et al

in Stem Cells (2013)

Since several years, adult/perinatal mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells have been widely used to help experimental animal to recover from spinal cord injury. More interestingly, recent clinical ... [more ▼]

Since several years, adult/perinatal mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells have been widely used to help experimental animal to recover from spinal cord injury. More interestingly, recent clinical trials confirmed the beneficial effect of those stem cells, which improve functional score of patients suffering from such lesions. However, a complete understanding of the mechanisms of stem cell-induced recovery is seriously lacking. Indeed, spinal cord injuries gathered a wide range of biochemical and physiopathological events (such as inflammation, oxidative stress, axonal damage, demyelination, etc) and the genuine healing process after cell transplantation is not sufficiently defined. This review aims to sum up recent data about cell therapy in spinal cord lesions using mesenchymal or recently identified neural crest stem cells, by describing precisely which physiopathological parameter is affected and the exact processes underlying the observed changes. Overall, although significant advances are acknowledged, it seems that further deep mechanistic investigation is needed for the development of optimized and efficient cell-based therapy protocols. [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic study of lumbar spinal cord after quadricipital eccentric exercise
Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2013, September 12)

Eccentric muscle contractions are characterized by an increase of muscle tension as it lengthens (slowering movements). Unaccustomed or intense eccentric exercise causes “Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness” ... [more ▼]

Eccentric muscle contractions are characterized by an increase of muscle tension as it lengthens (slowering movements). Unaccustomed or intense eccentric exercise causes “Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness” (DOMS). DOMS include muscle pain that appears 24 to 72 hours after exercise, but also stiffness, edema and muscle proteins release in plasma as a hallmark of muscle fibers injuries. The only systematic intervention that brings a muscle protection against DOMS is to realize submaximal eccentric contractions with a progressively increased intensity. The mechanism of this protection, called the “Repeated Bout Effect” (RBE), is not understood. However, it is likely explained by cellular, mechanical and neural theories [Scand.J.Med.&Sci.Sports, 13, 88, 2003]. The objective of this study is to better understand which neural signal is released in the muscle synapse and which brings protection by RBE. Male adult mice (C57BL6) were randomly divided into downhill running (DHR), uphill running (UHR) and untrained control (CONT) groups (n=4/group). DHR group is characterized by eccentric contractions of the quadriceps while UHR is concerned by concentric contractions. Running groups performed a warm-up of ten minutes followed by an interval exercise on an inclined treadmill at a velocity of 20cm/s. The latter consisted of running 18 bouts of 5 minutes interspersed with a 2 minutes rest. Lumbar spinal cord was dissected 24h after the race. Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins were separately extracted and subjected to a 2D-DIGE analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. We do not observe any cytoplasmic protein modification while in the nuclear extract, seven spots were more abundant in eccentric group and four in concentric group in comparison with control group. The mass spectrometry of these proteins reveals that they are implicated in axoplasmic transport. At 24 hours, too few proteins modifications were detected in lumbar spinal cord, maybe as a consequence of a too short period between race and euthanasia. Implication of axoplasmic transport comforts our starting hypothesis that nervous system is able to protect muscle during the RBE by a synthesis and then a synaptic release of molecules modifying the muscle physiology. [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic study of lumbar spinal cord after quadricipital eccentric exercise
Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Hody, Stéphanie ULg et al

in 17th EURON PhD meeting (2013, September)

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See detailThe susceptibility of the knee extensors to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage is not affected by leg dominance but by exercise order .
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Clinical Physiology & Functional Imaging (2013), 33(5), 373-380

The aims of this study were first to compare the response of dominant and non-dominant legs to eccentric exercise and second, to examine whether there is an effect of exercise order on the magnitude of ... [more ▼]

The aims of this study were first to compare the response of dominant and non-dominant legs to eccentric exercise and second, to examine whether there is an effect of exercise order on the magnitude of symptoms associated with intense eccentric protocols. Eighteen young men performed 3 sets of 30 maximal eccentric isokinetic (60°.sec-1) contractions of the knee extensors (range of motion, ROM: 0°-100°, 0=full extension) using either dominant or nondominant leg. They repeated a similar eccentric bout using the contralateral leg six weeks later. The sequence of leg’s use was allocated to create equally balanced groups. Four indirect markers of muscle damage including subjective pain intensity, maximal isometric strength, muscle stiffness and plasma CK activity were measured before and 24 hours after exercise. All markers changed significantly following the eccentric bout performed either by dominant or non-dominant legs but no significant difference was observed between legs. Interestingly, the comparison between the first and second eccentric bouts revealed that muscle soreness (-42%, p<0.001), CK activity (-62%, p<0.05) and strength loss (-54%, p<0.01) were significantly lower after the second bout. This study suggests that leg dominance does not influence the magnitude of exercise-induced muscle damage and supports for the first time the existence of a contralateral protection against exercise-induced muscle damage in the lower limbs. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of SV2 isoforms during rodent brain development
Crevecoeur, Julie; Foerch, P; Doupagne, Mélissa et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2013)

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See detailEffects of eccentrically and concentrically biased training on mouse muscle phenotype
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise (2013), 45(8), 1460-1468

Introduction: The molecular adaptations specifically induced by different muscle contraction types have only been partially elucidated. We previously demonstrated that eccentric contractions in human ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The molecular adaptations specifically induced by different muscle contraction types have only been partially elucidated. We previously demonstrated that eccentric contractions in human quadriceps elicited proteome modifications that suggest a muscle fiber typology adaptation. We address this question in a more systematic way by examining here the effects of different running modes on the mouse muscle proteome and the muscle fiber typology. Methods: Male adult mice (C57BL6) were randomly divided into downhill running (DHR, quadricipital eccentrically biased contractions), uphill running (UHR, quadricipital concentrically biased contractions) and untrained control (CONT) groups. Running groups performed five training sessions on an inclined treadmill for 75 to 135 min/day and the quadriceps muscles were dissected 96hours after the last session. Muscle protein extracts of DHR and UHR groups (n=4/group) were subjected to a 2D-DIGE analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. The assessment of fiber type, size and number was performed on the rectus femoris of the three groups (n=6/group) using myosin heavy chain (MHC) immunohistochemistry. Results: In the proteomic analysis, eight spots identified as the fast MHC isoforms exhibited a lower abundance in DHR compared to UHR (p<0.05, t-test). In contrast, ATP synthase subunit α and tubulin β were more expressed in DHR (p<0.05). A significant higher proportion of type I and IIa fibers was found for DHR compared to UHR or CONT groups (p<0.05, one-way ANOVA). Conclusions: Our data suggest that the eccentrically biased contractions in mice induced specific adaptations in protein expression and muscle fiber composition which may reflect a more oxidative muscle phenotype. The differences in stress placed on the muscle between both trainings may be responsible for some unique adaptations resulting from the eccentrically biased training. [less ▲]

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See detailMuscle fatigue experienced during maximal eccentric exercise is predictive of the plasma creatine kinase (CK) response
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports (2013), 23(4), 501-7

Unaccustomed eccentric exercise may cause skeletal muscle damage with an increase in plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. Although the wide variability among individuals in CK response to standardized ... [more ▼]

Unaccustomed eccentric exercise may cause skeletal muscle damage with an increase in plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. Although the wide variability among individuals in CK response to standardized lengthening contractions has been well described, the reasons underlying this phenomenon have not yet been understood. Therefore, this study investigated a possible correlation of the changes in muscle damage indirect markers after an eccentric exercise with the decline in muscle performance during the exercise. Twenty-seven healthy untrained male subjects performed three sets of 30 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the knee extensors. The muscular work was recorded using an isokinetic dynamometer to assess muscle fatigue by means of various fatigue indices. Plasma CK activity, muscle soreness, and stiffness were measured before (pre) and one day after (post) exercise. The eccentric exercise bout induced significant changes of the three muscle damage indirect markers. Large intersubject variability was observed for all criteria measured. More interestingly, the log (CKpost/CKpre) and muscle stiffness appeared to be closely correlated with the relative work decrease (r = 0.84, r2 = 0.70 and r = 0.75, r2 = 0.56, respectively). This is the first study to propose that the muscle fatigue profile during maximal eccentric protocol could predict the magnitude of the symptoms associated with muscle damage in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro and in vivo Characterization of Adult Bone Marrow Neural Crest Stem Cells
Coste, Cécile ULg; Neirinckx, Virginie ULg; Manguette, Jérôme et al

Poster (2013, May 31)

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See detailAdult Bone Marrow Neural Crest Stem Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells are not able to Replace Lost Neurons in Acute MPTP-lesioned Mice
Neirinckx, Virginie ULg; Marquet, Alice ULg; Coste, Cécile ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(5),

Adult bone marrow stroma contains multipotent stem cells (BMSC) that are a mixed population of mesenchymal and neural-crest derived stem cells. Both cells are endowed with in vitro multi-lineage ... [more ▼]

Adult bone marrow stroma contains multipotent stem cells (BMSC) that are a mixed population of mesenchymal and neural-crest derived stem cells. Both cells are endowed with in vitro multi-lineage differentiation abilities, then constituting an attractive and easy-available source of material for cell therapy in neurological disorders. Whereas the in vivo integration and differentiation of BMSC in neurons into the central nervous system is currently matter of debate, we report here that once injected into the striatum of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated mice, pure populations of either bone marrow neural crest stem cells (NCSC) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) survived only transiently into the lesioned brain. Moreover, they do not migrate through the brain tissue, neither modify their initial phenotype, while no recovery of the dopaminergic system integrity was observed. Consequently, we tend to conclude that MSC/NCSC are not able to replace lost neurons in acute MPTP-lesioned dopaminergic system through a suitable integration and/or differentiation process. Altogether with recent data, it appears that neuroprotective, neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory features characterizing BMSC are of greater interest as regards CNS lesions management. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of eccentric versus concentric training on mouse muscle phenotype
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Abstract Book of 10th Meeting of Belgian Society for Neuroscience (2013, May)

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See detailAdult Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Adult Neural Crest Stem Cells and Therapy of Neurological Pathologies: a State of Play
Neirinckx, Virginie ULg; Coste, Cécile ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg et al

in Stem Cells Translational Medicine (2013), 2(4), 284-296

Adult stem cells are endowed with in vitro multi-lineage differentiation abilities, and constitute an attractive autologous source of material for cell therapy in neurological disorders. With regards to ... [more ▼]

Adult stem cells are endowed with in vitro multi-lineage differentiation abilities, and constitute an attractive autologous source of material for cell therapy in neurological disorders. With regards to lately published results, the ability of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and neural crest stem cells (NCSC) to integrate and differentiate into neurons once inside the central nervous system (CNS) is currently questioned. In this review, we collected exhaustive data on MSC/NCSC neural differentiation in vitro. We then analyzed pre-clinical cell therapy experiments in different models for neurological diseases and concluded that neural differentiation is probably not the leading property of adult MSC and NCSC concerning neurological pathologies management. Definitely, a fine analysis of the molecules that are secreted by MSC and NCSC would be of significant interest regarding their important contribution to the clinical and pathological recovery after CNS lesions. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural fate of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Crest Stem Cells : Which ways to get neurons for cell therapy purpose ?
Neirinckx, Virginie ULg; Coste, Cécile ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg et al

in Trends in cell signaling pathways in neuronal fate decision (2013)

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See detailPrévention des courbatures musculaires en pratique sportive
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Delvaux, François; Rodriguez de la Cruz, Carlos ULg et al

in Prévention des lésions musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

L’exercice excentrique, lorsqu’il est réalisé de manière intense et/ou inhabituelle, est réputé être à l’origine de diverses sensations de courbatures d’apparition retardée. Ces douleurs musculaires ... [more ▼]

L’exercice excentrique, lorsqu’il est réalisé de manière intense et/ou inhabituelle, est réputé être à l’origine de diverses sensations de courbatures d’apparition retardée. Ces douleurs musculaires, appelées DOMS pour Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness, s’accompagnent de déficits structuro-fonctionnels pouvant persister pendant plusieurs jours. Bien qu’il disparaisse spontanément après quelques jours de récupération, le phénomène des DOMS reste problématique chez le sportif en raison des conséquences néfastes associées : perturbation de l’entraînement sportif, diminution de la performance athlétique et majoration du risque de lésions véritables en cas de poursuite d’activités sportives. Il apparaît donc essentiel, pour un sportif soumis à un entraînement excentrique, d’échapper aux DOMS. La mise au point d’approches susceptibles de réduire les conséquences néfastes des DOMS a constitué un objectif prioritaire de nombreuses études. Ainsi, les premiers essais ont été basés sur des stratégies nutritionnelles ou pharmacologiques ainsi que sur des procédés cliniques. Bien que certains procédés tels que le massage ou les apports nutritionnels puissent influencer de manière positive l’un ou l’autre symptôme, ceux-ci ne semblent pas capables d’agir sur le phénomène des DOMS dans sa globalité. Actuellement, la seule démarche préventive réellement efficace reste la réalisation d’un entraînement excentrique à intensité sous-maximale progressivement intensifiées. [less ▲]

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