References of "Renard, Jeanne de Chantal"
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See detailHigh TMEM45A expression is correlated to epidermal keratinization
Hayez, Aurélie; Malaisse, Jérémy; Rogiers, Edith et al

in Experimental Dermatology (2014), 23

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See detailProgramming of neuroendocrine self in the thymus and its defect in neuroendocrine autoimmunity
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Bodart, Gwennaëlle ULg; Henry, Séverine et al

in Frontiers in Neuroscience (2013), 7

During centuries after its first description by Galen, the thymus has been considered only as a vestigial endocrine organ until the discovery in 1961 by Jacques FAP Miller of its essential role in the ... [more ▼]

During centuries after its first description by Galen, the thymus has been considered only as a vestigial endocrine organ until the discovery in 1961 by Jacques FAP Miller of its essential role in the development of T (thymo-dependent) lymphocytes. A unique thymus appeared for the first time in cartilaginous fishes some 500 millions years ago, in the same time or shortly after the emergence of the adaptive (acquired) immune system. The thymus may be compared to a small brain or a computer highly specialized in the orchestration of central immunological self-tolerance. This latter was a necessity for the survival of species given the potent evolutionary pressure impacted by the high risk of autotoxicity inherent to the stochastic generation of the diversity of immune cell receptors that characterize the adaptive immune response. The new paradigm of neuroendocrine self-peptides has been proposed together with the definition of neuroendocrine self. Neuroendocrine self-peptides are not secreted by thymic epithelial cells (TECs) according to the classic model of neuroendocrine signaling, but processed for a presentation by, or in association with, the thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene/protein controls the transcription of neuroendocrine genes in TECs. The presentation of self-peptides in the thymus is responsible for the clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells emerging during the random recombination of gene segments that encode variable parts of the T cell receptor for the antigen (TCR). In the same time, self-antigen presentation in the thymus also generates regulatory T (Treg) cells that are able to inhibit in the periphery self-reactive T cells having escaped negative selection in the thymus. Several arguments show that the origin of autoimmunity directed against neuroendocrine glands primarily results from a defect in the intrathymic programming of self-tolerance to neuroendocrine functions. This defect may be genetic or acquired during an enteroviral infection, for example. This novel knowledge of normal and pathologic functions of the thymus already constitutes a solid basis for the development of a novel type of tolerogenic/negative self-vaccination against type 1 diabetes (T1D). [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of nuclear totipotency of fetal bovine diploid germ cells by nuclear transfer.
Moens, A.; Chesne, P.; Delhaise, F. et al

in Theriogenology (1996), 46(5), 871-80

Nuclear transfer was used to study nuclear reprogramming of fetal diploid bovine germ cells collected at two stages of the fetal development. In the first case, germ cells of both sexes were collected ... [more ▼]

Nuclear transfer was used to study nuclear reprogramming of fetal diploid bovine germ cells collected at two stages of the fetal development. In the first case, germ cells of both sexes were collected during their period of intragonadal mitotic multiplication at 48 days post coitum (d.p.c.). In the second case, only male germ cells were collected after this period, between 105 and 185 d.p.c. Isolated germ cells were fused with enucleated oocytes. Reconstituted embryos were cultured in vitro and those reaching the compacted morula or blastocyst stage were transferred into synchronous recipient heifers. Of 511 reconstituted embryos with 48 d.p.c. germ cells (309 males and 202 females), 48% (247/511 ) cleaved; 2.7% (14/511 ) reached the compacted morula stage and 8 of them the blastocyst stage (1.6%). No difference was observed between sexes. All 14 compacted morulae/blastocysts were transferred into 6 recipients and one pregnancy was initiated. This recipient was slaughtered at Day 35 and an abnormal conceptus (extended trophectoderm and degenerated embryo) was collected. Its male sex, genetically determined, corresponded to that of donor fetus. Of 380 reconstituted embryos with male 105 to 185 d.p.c. germ cells, 72.1% (274/380 ) cleaved, 2.1% (8 380 ) reached the compact morula stage and 7 of these the blastocyst stage (1.8%). Three blastocysts and one morula were transferred into 4 recipients. Two became pregnant at Day 21 but only one at Day 35 which aborted around Day 40. Our results show that the nucleus of diploid bovine germ cells of both sexes can be reprogrammed. However, in the absence of further development of these reconstituted embryos, nuclear totipotency of bovine diploid germ cells remains to be evidenced. [less ▲]

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