References of "Radioti, Aikaterini"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe tails of the satellite auroral footprints at Jupiter
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Saur, J.; Grodent, Denis ULiege et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2017), 122

The electro-magnetic interaction between Io, Europa and Ganymede and the rotating plasma that surrounds Jupiter has a signature in the aurora of the planet. This signature, called the satellite footprint ... [more ▼]

The electro-magnetic interaction between Io, Europa and Ganymede and the rotating plasma that surrounds Jupiter has a signature in the aurora of the planet. This signature, called the satellite footprint, takes the form of a series of spots located slightly downstream of the feet of the field lines passing through the moon under consideration. In the case of Io, these spots are also followed by an extended tail in the downstream direction relative to the plasma flow encountering the moon. A few examples of a tail for the Europa footprint have also been reported in the northern hemisphere. Here we present a simplified Alfvénic model for footprint tails and simulations of vertical brightness profiles for various electron distribution, which favour such a model over quasi-static models. We also report here additional cases of Europa footprint tails, in both hemispheres, even though such detections are rare and difficult. Furthermore, we show that the Ganymede footprint can also be followed by a similar tail. Finally, we present a case of a 320° long Io footprint tail, while other cases in similar configurations do not display such a length. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSimilarity of the Jovian satellite footprints: spots multiplicity and dynamics
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Badman, S. V. et al

in Icarus (2017), 292(2017), 208217

In the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, the intense interaction of the satellites Io, Europa, Ganymede and Enceladus with their surrounding plasma environment leaves a signature in the aurora of the ... [more ▼]

In the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, the intense interaction of the satellites Io, Europa, Ganymede and Enceladus with their surrounding plasma environment leaves a signature in the aurora of the planet. Called satellite footprints, these auroral features appear either as a single spot (Europa and Enceladus) or as multiple spots (Io and Ganymede). Moreover, they can be followed by extended trailing tails in the case of Io and Europa, while no tail has been reported for Ganymede and Enceladus, yet. Here we show that all Jovian footprints can be made of several spots. Furthermore, the footprints all experience brightness variations on timescale of 2-3 minutes. We also demonstrate that the satellite location relative to the plasma sheet is not the only driver for the footprint brightness, but that the plasma environment and the magnetic field strength also play a role. These new findings demonstrate that the Europa and Ganymede footprints are very similar to the Io footprint. As a consequence, the processes expected to take place at Io, such as the bi-directional electron acceleration by Alfvén waves or the partial reflection of these waves on plasma density gradients, can most likely be extended to the other footprints, suggesting that they are indeed universal processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (20 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailNorth and South: Simultaneous observations of both Jovian poles from Juno and the Hubble Space Telescope
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Gladstone, George R.; Grodent, Denis ULiege et al

Poster (2017, June 15)

On its elongated orbit, Juno flies over the poles of Jupiter every 53.5 days. The few hours before and after the perijove offer unique opportunities to observe the whole polar region from close distance ... [more ▼]

On its elongated orbit, Juno flies over the poles of Jupiter every 53.5 days. The few hours before and after the perijove offer unique opportunities to observe the whole polar region from close distance. However, Juno’s instruments can only observe one hemisphere at a time. Fortunately, the Hubble Space Telescope points its 2.4 m mirror toward the opposite hemisphere during some of these time intervals, providing truly simultaneous observations of both poles. We compare observations from Juno-UVS with Far-UV imaging sequences from the Hubble’s Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). Juno-UVS acquires spectrally resolved images of 17 ms exposure every 30 s Juno spin in the 70-205 nm wavelength range, while STIS can acquire about 270 consecutive 10 s images per HST orbit in the 130-160 nm range, but without any spectral resolution. Despite some differences, these datasets are similar enough in terms of spectral coverage, temporal and spatial resolution to allow direct comparisons. On Jupiter, the magnetic field is highly asymmetric and displays significant localized anomalies. Furthermore, most processes leading to auroral emissions depend on the magnetic field magnitude, either in the equatorial plane, in the acceleration regions, or in the upper atmosphere. Investigating morphological and brightness discrepancies between the two hemispheres provides precious clues on the current systems flowing in the magnetosphere and on the charged particles acceleration mechanisms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMorphology of the UV aurorae Jupiter during Juno’s first perijove observations
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Gladstone, G. R.; Grodent, Denis ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017)

On 27 August 2016, the NASA Juno spacecraft performed its first close-up observations of Jupiter during its perijove. Here we present the UV images and color ratio maps from the Juno-ultraviolet ... [more ▼]

On 27 August 2016, the NASA Juno spacecraft performed its first close-up observations of Jupiter during its perijove. Here we present the UV images and color ratio maps from the Juno-ultraviolet spectrometer UV imaging spectrograph acquired at that time. Data were acquired during four sequences (three in the north, one in the south) from 5:00 UT to 13:00 UT. From these observations, we produced complete maps of the Jovian aurorae, including the nightside. The sequence shows the development of intense outer emission outside the main oval, first in a localized region (255 ∘ –295 ∘ System III longitude) and then all around the pole, followed by a large nightside protrusion of auroral emissions from the main emission into the polar region. Some localized features show signs of differential drift with energy, typical of plasma injections in the middle magnetosphere. Finally, the color-ratio map in the north shows a well-defined area in the polar region possibly linked to the polar cap. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (17 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailHST observations of Jupiter's UV aurora during Juno's orbits PJ03, PJ04 and PJ05
Grodent, Denis ULiege; Gladstone, G Randall; Clarke, John T. et al

Poster (2017, April)

The intense ultraviolet auroral emissions of Jupiter are currently being monitored in the frame of a large Hubble Space Telescope (HST) program meant to support the NASA Juno prime mission. The present ... [more ▼]

The intense ultraviolet auroral emissions of Jupiter are currently being monitored in the frame of a large Hubble Space Telescope (HST) program meant to support the NASA Juno prime mission. The present study addresses the three first Juno orbits (PJ03, 04 and 05) during which HST obtained parallel observations. These three campaigns basically consist of a 2-week period bracketing the time of Juno’s closest approach of Jupiter (CA). At least one HST visit is scheduled every day during the week before and the week following CA. During the ∼12-hour period centered on CA and depending on observing constraints, several HST visits are programmed in order to obtain as many simultaneous observations with Juno-UVS as possible. In addition, at least one HST visit is obtained near Juno’s apojove, when UVS is continuously monitoring Jupiter’s global auroral power, without spatial resolution, for about 12 hours. We are using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in time-tag mode in order to provide spatially resolved movies of Jupiter’s highly dynamic aurora with timescales ranging from seconds to several days. We discuss the preliminary exploitation of the HST data and present these results in such a way as to provide a global magnetospheric context for the different Juno instruments studying Jupiter’s magnetosphere, as well as for the numerous ground based and space based observatories participating to the Juno mission. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailMulti-instrument overview of the 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's magnetosphere
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Roussos, Elias; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege et al

Conference (2017, March 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStagnation of Saturn's auroral emission at noon
Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResponse of Jupiter's auroras to conditions in the interplanetary medium as measured by the Hubble Space Telescope and Juno
Nichols, J. D.; Badman, S. V.; Bagenal, F. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017)

We present the first comparison of Jupiter's auroral morphology with an extended, continuous and complete set of near-Jupiter interplanetary data, revealing the response of Jupiter's auroras to the ... [more ▼]

We present the first comparison of Jupiter's auroral morphology with an extended, continuous and complete set of near-Jupiter interplanetary data, revealing the response of Jupiter's auroras to the interplanetary conditions. We show that for ∼1-3 days following compression region onset the planet's main emission brightened. A duskside poleward region also brightened during compressions, as well as during shallow rarefaction conditions at the start of the program. The power emitted from the noon active region did not exhibit dependence on any interplanetary parameter, though the morphology typically differed between rarefactions and compressions. The auroras equatorward of the main emission brightened over ∼10 days following an interval of increased volcanic activity on Io. These results show that the dependence of Jupiter's magnetosphere and auroras on the interplanetary conditions are more diverse than previously thought. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAuroral streamer and its role in driving wave-like pre-onset aurora
Yao, Zhonghua ULiege; Pu, Z. Y.; Rae, I. J. et al

in Geoscience Letters (2017), 4(1), 8

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailEnergy Dissipation in Saturn’s Magnetotail: A Comparative Magnetotail Approach
Yao, Zhonghua ULiege; Coates, Andrew; Ray, Licia et al

Poster (2016, December 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe complex behavior of the satellite footprints at Jupiter: the result of universal processes?
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Badman, Sarah V. et al

Poster (2016, December 14)

At Jupiter, some auroral emissions are directly related to the electromagnetic interaction between the moons Io, Europa and Ganymede on one hand and the rapidly rotating magnetospheric plasma on the other ... [more ▼]

At Jupiter, some auroral emissions are directly related to the electromagnetic interaction between the moons Io, Europa and Ganymede on one hand and the rapidly rotating magnetospheric plasma on the other hand. Out of the three, the Io footprint is the brightest and the most studied. Present in each hemisphere, it is made of at least three different spots and an extended trailing tail. The variability of the brightness of the spots as well as their relative location has been tentatively explained with a combination of Alfvén waves’ partial reflections on density gradients and bi-directional electron acceleration at high latitude. Should this scenario be correct, then the other footprints should also show the same behavior. Here we show that all footprints are, at least occasionally, made of several spots and they all display a tail. We also show that these spots share many characteristics with those of the Io footprint (i.e. some significant variability on timescales of 2-3 minutes). Additionally, we present some Monte-Carlo simulations indicating that the tails are also due to Alfvén waves electron acceleration rather than quasi-static electron acceleration. Even if some details still need clarification, these observations strengthen the scenario proposed for the Io footprint and thus indicate that these processes are universal. In addition, we will present some early results from Juno-UVS concerning the location and morphology of the footprints during the first low-altitude observations of the polar aurorae. These observations, carried out in previously unexplored longitude ranges, should either confirm or contradict our understanding of the footprints. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailJupiter’s auroras during the Juno approach phase as observed by the Hubble Space Telescope
Nichols, Jonathan D; Clarke, John T; Orton, Glennn S et al

Conference (2016, December 13)

We present movies of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of Jupiter’s FUV auroras observed during the Juno approach phase and first capture orbit, and compare with Juno observations of the ... [more ▼]

We present movies of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of Jupiter’s FUV auroras observed during the Juno approach phase and first capture orbit, and compare with Juno observations of the interplanetary medium near Jupiter and inside the magnetosphere. Jupiter’s FUV auroras indicate the nature of the dynamic processes occurring in Jupiter’s magnetosphere, and the approach phase provided a unique opportunity to obtain a full set of interplanetary data near to Jupiter at the time of a program of HST observations, along with the first simultaneous with Juno observations inside the magnetosphere. The overall goal was to determine the nature of the solar wind effect on Jupiter’s magnetosphere. HST observations were obtained with typically 1 orbit per day over three intervals: 16 May – 7 June, 22-30 June and 11-18 July, i.e. while Juno was in the solar wind, around the bow shock and magnetosphere crossings, and in the mid-latitude middle-outer magnetospheres. We show that these intervals are characterised by particularly dynamic polar auroras, and significant variations in the auroral power output caused by e.g. dawn storms, intense main emission and poleward forms. We compare the variation of these features with Juno observations of interplanetary compression regions and the magnetospheric environment during the intervals of these observations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDynamics of the flares in the active polar region of Jupiter
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Badman, S. V. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2016)

The dusk-side of the polar region of Jupiter's UV aurorae, called the active region, sometimes exhibits quasi-periodic (QP) flares on time-scales of 2-3 minutes. Based on Hubble Space Telescope Far-UV ... [more ▼]

The dusk-side of the polar region of Jupiter's UV aurorae, called the active region, sometimes exhibits quasi-periodic (QP) flares on time-scales of 2-3 minutes. Based on Hubble Space Telescope Far-UV time-tag images, we show for the first time that the northern hemisphere also displays QP-flares. The area covered by these flares can reach up to 2.4 × 108 km2 (i.e. the whole active region), but often only involves an area an order of magnitude smaller. Using a magnetic field mapping model, we deduced that these areas correspond to the dayside outer magnetosphere. In our dataset, quasi-periodic features are only seen on half of the cases and even on a given observation, a region can be quiet for one half and blinking on the other half. Consecutive observations in the two hemispheres show that the brightening can occur in phase. Combined with the size and location of the flares, this behaviour suggests that the QP-flares most likely take place on closed magnetic field lines. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (12 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailFirst Hubble Space Telescope Movies of Jupiter’s Ultraviolet Aurora During the NASA Juno Prime Mission
Grodent, Denis ULiege; Gladstone, G. Randall; Clarke, John T. et al

Poster (2016, December)

The primary goal of this HST campaign is to complement Juno-UVS (Ultraviolet Spectrograph) observations. This complementarity is four-fold as HST observes Jupiter’s aurora when: 1) Juno-UVS is turned off ... [more ▼]

The primary goal of this HST campaign is to complement Juno-UVS (Ultraviolet Spectrograph) observations. This complementarity is four-fold as HST observes Jupiter’s aurora when: 1) Juno-UVS is turned off, that is about 98% of Juno’s 14-day orbit, and Juno’s in situ instruments are in operation. 2) Juno-UVS is operating, but observes the opposite hemisphere of Jupiter. 3) UVS is on in the same hemisphere, but too close to Jupiter to have a global, contextual, view of the aurora and/or UVS is affected by the noise induced by Jupiter’s radiation belts. 4) Juno is too far from Jupiter to get a detailed view of the aurora. In addition, HST will observe the auroral and airglow emissions of the Galilean moons Io, Ganymede and Europa, when UVS is measuring their auroral footprints in Jupiter’s ionosphere. During this campaign, HST is obtaining 45-min STIS time-tag images -movies- of both hemispheres of Jupiter and STIS/COS spectra of Jupiter's moons. These observations are taking place during 4 sequences of Juno's orbit (Figure: typical orbit in magnetic coordinates): 1) Perijove segment: a 6-hour sequence bracketing the time of Juno's closest approach of Jupiter. 2) Crossing segments: few hours periods during which Juno is crossing the magnetic equator of Jupiter and in situ instruments are observing the plasma sheet particles. 3) Perijove +/- 1 Jovian rotation (or more), to provide a context for the auroral activity before and after perijove. 4) Apojove segment: a 12-hour period bracketing the time when Juno is farthest from Jupiter and Juno-UVS is continuously monitoring the global auroral UV power of Jupiter. During Juno orbit PJ5, between 28 Nov. and 07 Dec. 2016, HST obtains 9 STIS movies: 3 movies of the northern aurora near perijove, 1 movie (north) one Jovian rotation before and 2 movies (south- north) one and two Jovian rotations after perijove, 2 movies (north) during two close CS crossings, and 1 movie near apojove. These movies will be commented during this presentation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPulsations of the polar cusp aurora at Saturn
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege; Roussos, E. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2016), 121

The magnetospheric cusp is a region connecting the interplanetary environment to the ionosphere and enabling solar wind particles to reach the ionosphere. We report the detection of several isolated high ... [more ▼]

The magnetospheric cusp is a region connecting the interplanetary environment to the ionosphere and enabling solar wind particles to reach the ionosphere. We report the detection of several isolated high-latitude auroral emissions with the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph of the Cassini spacecraft. We suggest that these auroral spots, located in the dawn-to-noon sector and poleward of the main emission, are the ionospheric signatures of the magnetospheric cusp, in agreement with some previous observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. The high-latitude cusp auroral signature has been associated with high-latitude lobe reconnection in the presence of a southward interplanetary magnetic field. The occurrence rate of the polar cusp aurora suggests that lobe reconnection is frequent at Saturn. Several auroral imaging sequences reveal a quasiperiodic brightening of the polar cusp aurora with a period in the range of 60 to 70 min. Similar pulsations in the energetic electron fluxes and in the azimuthal component of the magnetic field are simultaneously observed by Cassini instruments, suggesting the presence of field-aligned currents. Pulsed dayside magnetopause reconnection is a likely common triggering process for the cusp auroral brightenings at Saturn and the quasiperiodic pulsations in the high-latitude energetic electron fluxes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStatistical study of Saturn's auroral electron properties with Cassini/UVIS FUV spectral images
Gustin, Jacques ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege et al

in Icarus (2016)

About 2000 FUV spectra of different regions of Saturn's aurora, obtained with Cassini/UVIS from December 2007 to October 2014 have been examined. Two methods have been employed to determine the mean ... [more ▼]

About 2000 FUV spectra of different regions of Saturn's aurora, obtained with Cassini/UVIS from December 2007 to October 2014 have been examined. Two methods have been employed to determine the mean energy 〈E〉 of the precipitating electrons. The first is based on the absorption of the auroral emission by hydrocarbons and the second uses the ratio between the brightness of the Lyman-α line and the H2 total UV emission (Lyα/H2), which is directly related to 〈E〉 via a radiative transfer formalism. In addition, two atmospheric models obtained recently from UVIS polar occultations have been employed for the first time. It is found that the atmospheric model related to North observations near 70° latitude provides the results most consistent with constraints previously published. On a global point of view, the two methods provide comparable results, with 〈E〉 mostly in the 7–17 keV range with the hydrocarbon method and 〈E〉 in the 1–11 keV range with the Lyα/H2 method. Since hydrocarbons have been detected on ∼20% of the auroral spectra, the Lyα/H2 technique is more effective to describe the primary auroral electrons, as it is applicable to all spectra and allows an access to the lowest range of energies (≤5 keV), unreachable by the hydrocarbon method. The distribution of 〈E〉 is found fully compatible with independent HST/ACS constraints (emission peak in the 840–1450 km range) and FUSE findings (emission peaking at pressure level ≤0.2 µbar). In addition, 〈E〉 exhibits enhancements in the 3 LT–10 LT sector, consistent with SKR intensity measurements. An energy flux–electron energy diagram built from all the data points strongly suggests that acceleration by field-aligned potentials as described by Knight's theory is a main mechanism responsible for electron precipitation creating the aurora. Assuming a fixed electron temperature of 0.1 keV, a best-fit equatorial electron source population density of 3 × 103 m−3 is derived, which matches very well to the plasma properties observed with Cassini MAG and CAPS/ELS instruments. However, several auroral regions are characterized by relatively high 〈E〉 and low energy flux, suggesting that additional processes such as plasma injections or magnetic reconnections must be accounted for to explain the emission in these regions. The Lyα/H2 ratio technique can be used to build maps of 〈E〉 from single spectral images. As expected, preliminary results show that the spatial distribution of 〈E〉 is not uniform, as seen on Jupiter. Our study reveals that a fraction of the aurora is due to very low energy electrons (<1 keV). Even in this case, comparisons between observed and modeled spectra show that 100 eV is a suitable value to represent the average energy of the secondary electrons. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULiège)
See detailCassini UVIS Auroral Observations in 2016
Pryor, Wayne R.; Jouchoux, Alain; Esposito, Larry et al

Conference (2016, October)

In June of 2016, the Cassini Saturn orbiter began a series of high inclination orbits that will continue until September 2017 when the mission ends as Cassini enters the Saturn atmosphere. These orbits ... [more ▼]

In June of 2016, the Cassini Saturn orbiter began a series of high inclination orbits that will continue until September 2017 when the mission ends as Cassini enters the Saturn atmosphere. These orbits present excellent views of Saturn's polar regions suitable for auroral imaging at the closest distances to date, with the additional prospect of simultaneous particle and fields measurements within the sources of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) associated with ultraviolet auroral emissions and/or acceleration regions likely coinciding with them. We will present new Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) auroral images, spectra and movies obtained during the summer and fall of 2016 and put them in the context of auroral data collected since Cassini orbit insertion in 2004. Included in the new data will be UVIS south polar observations obtained simultaneously with Hubble Space Telescope observations of the north polar region on June 29, 2016 and August 19, 2016. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailMulti-instrument overview of the 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's magnetosphere and auroral emissions
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Roussos, Elias; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege et al

Conference (2016, May 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailJupiter’s magnetopause: A search for reconnection and wave signatures
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Kivelson, Margaret; Khurana, Krishan et al

Conference (2016, April 26)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailMulti-instrument overview of the 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's magnetosphere and auroral emissions
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Roussos, Elias; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege et al

Conference (2016, April 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (7 ULiège)