References of "Parmentier, Eric"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeet the Damselfishes
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Biology of Damselfishes (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCerato-Mandibular Ligament: a Key Trait in Damselfishes?
Olivier, Damien ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Biology of Damselfishes (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTrophic Ecology of Damselfishes
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Olivier, Damien ULg; Gajdzik, Laura ULg et al

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Biology of Damselfishes (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (2 ULg)
See detailBiology of Damselfishes
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

Book published by CRC-Press (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFrom commensalism to parasitism in Carapidae (Ophidiiformes): heterochronic modes of development?
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lanterbecq, Déborah; Eeckhaut, Igor

in PeerJ (2016), 4

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailSciaenops ocellatus: Daily and seasonal sound variation during spawning in aquaculture.
Henry, Séverine ULg; Falguière, Jean Claude; Devillers, Samson et al

Poster (2016, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSound Production by a Recoiling System in the Pempheridae and Terapontidae
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Fine, Michael; Mok, Hin-Kiu

in Journal of Morphology (2016)

Sound-producing mechanisms in fishes are extraordinarily diversified. We report here original mechanisms of three species from two families: the pempherid Pempheris oualensis, and the terapontids Terapon ... [more ▼]

Sound-producing mechanisms in fishes are extraordinarily diversified. We report here original mechanisms of three species from two families: the pempherid Pempheris oualensis, and the terapontids Terapon jarbua and Pelates quadrilineatus. All sonic mechanisms are built on the same structures. The rostral part of the swimbladder is connected to a pair of large sonic muscles from the head whereas the posterior part is fused with bony widenings of vertebral bodies. Two bladder regions are separated by a stretchable fenestra that allows forward extension of the anterior bladder during muscle contraction. A recoiling apparatus runs between the inner face of the anterior swimbladder and a vertebral body expansion. The elastic nature of the recoiling apparatus supports its role in helping the swimbladder to recover its initial position during sonic muscle relaxation. This system should aid fast contraction (between 100 and 250Hz) of sonic muscles. There are many differences between species in terms of the swimbladder and its attachments to the vertebral column, muscle origins, and morphology of the recoiling apparatus. The recoiling apparatus found in the phylogenetically-related families (Glaucosomatidae, Pempheridae, Terapontidae) could indicate a new character within the Percomorpharia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTrophic ecology of the seagrass-inhabiting footballer demoiselle Chrysiptera annulata (Peters, 1855); comparison with three other reef-associated damselfishes
Lepoint, Gilles ULg; Michel, Loïc ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg et al

in Belgian Journal of Zoology (2016), 146(1), 21-32

Many damselfishes (Pomacentridae) are herbivorous or omnivorous with an important contribution of different kinds of algae in their diet. They display different levels of territoriality and farming ... [more ▼]

Many damselfishes (Pomacentridae) are herbivorous or omnivorous with an important contribution of different kinds of algae in their diet. They display different levels of territoriality and farming behavior, from almost non territorial to monoculture farmers. In addition, few species inhabit seagrass meadows but, presently, none can be considered as seagrass-eating specialists. The footballer demoiselle, Chrysiptera annulata, is found in the seagrass meadows on the reef flat of the Great Reef of Toliara (Madagascar, Mozambique Channel). Regarding this unusual habitat for pomacentrid, this study aimed to answer 3 questions: 1) What is the diet of C. annulata? 2) Do the resources supporting this diet include seagrass? 3) Does its trophic niche overlap those of other sympatric damselfishes (Pomacentrus trilineatus, Chrysiptera unimaculata and Plectroglyphidodon lacrymatus) living in close association with macrophytes or eating algae? Stomach content examination and stable isotope analysis showed that the footballer demoiselle is not a seagrass consumer but is an omnivorous/herbivorous species heavily relying on algal resources and small invertebrates. SIAR, a stable isotope mixing model, indicated it assimilated large amount of turf algae and various benthic or planktonic invertebrates in lower proportions. SIBER metrics pointed out that isotopic niche of the footballer demoiselle partly overlaps the one of its congeneric C. unimaculata, but not those of P. trilineatus and P. lacrymatus. Trophic strategies of C. annulata differed both from farming species such as P. lacrymatus or from less territorial herbivores such as P. trilineatus. Its seagrass meadow habitat on the Great Reef of Toliara allow the conquest of an unusual habitat for damselfishes and could limit competition with C. unimaculata, a species displaying the same territorial behavior and the same isotopic niche but living on the reef itself. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPassive acoustic recording of Ophidion rochei calling activity in Calvi Bay (France)
Kever, Loïc ULg; Lejeune, Pierre; Michel, Loïc ULg et al

in Marine Ecology (2016)

Passive acoustic recording (PAR) systems are non-invasive and allow researchers to collect data on large spatial and temporal scales. Since fish sounds are species-specific and repetitive, PAR can provide ... [more ▼]

Passive acoustic recording (PAR) systems are non-invasive and allow researchers to collect data on large spatial and temporal scales. Since fish sounds are species-specific and repetitive, PAR can provide a large amount of data about spatio-temporal variation in fish distribution and behaviors. Ophidion rochei is a sand-dwelling species from Mediterranean and Black Sea meaning the behavior of this discreet nocturnal fish cannot be observed in the field. Fortunately, male O. rochei produce long multiple-pulsed calls that are easy to identify. The aim of this study was to determine that male calls are linked to reproduction behaviors. If so, PAR would allow a fine description of the seasonal and daily cycles in O. rochei reproduction. A hydrophone was deployed from 18 July 2011 to 21 June 2012 and from 7 June 2013 to 2 July 2013 on a sandy area (42.5801° N, 8.7285° E) in front of the STARESO research station (NW Corsica). Male sounds were obtained only at night from late spring to early fall. The annual sound production period corresponds to the reproductive season of O. rochei. Sound production followed diel cycles: it was sustained for the entire night at the beginning of the sound production season but limited to shorter periods in the evening during the second half of the season. These differences in daily and seasonal sound production tempo can be used in future recordings to make inter-annual comparisons and estimate the physiological state of the fish. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFurther insights into the metamorphosis process in a carapid fish
Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Journal of Zoology (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (3 ULg)
See detailUnderwater silence world: the end of the dogma
Parmentier, Eric ULg

Conference (2015, December 17)

Passive acoustics can offer inexpensive, non-invasive and no-destructive means of assessing temporal and spatial patterns in the distribution of individuals engaging in calling. In marine environments ... [more ▼]

Passive acoustics can offer inexpensive, non-invasive and no-destructive means of assessing temporal and spatial patterns in the distribution of individuals engaging in calling. In marine environments, passive acoustic recording methods can be used at depths not accessible to humans, independent of weather conditions, and for a long term. However, these studies have often restricted their investigations to the monitoring of one or two aquatic species. One reason of this loss of information is quite easy to explain: most of the sounds can be detected but cannot be identified. In many families, calling abilities are described in one or two species only although the descriptions of sound producing mechanisms have highlighted other members should be able to make sounds. Since 50 years, sounds were for example described in more or less 40 pomacentrid species but all the 392 species should be able to make sounds. This situation can be more complicated since some species are able to make different kinds of sounds according to the behavioural context. Some call characteristics can also be modulated according to the size in some species only. It shows an important amount of work has to be done to be able to understand the reef soundscape and to develop call recognition software system. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates: Project introduction and first results
Liebschner, Alexander; Seibel, Henrike; Teilmann, Jonas et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (2015), 875

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnthropogenic particles in stomachs of anchovies (Engraulis encrasicolus) related to gill rakers morphology
Collard, France ULg; Das, Krishna ULg; Gilbert, Bernard ULg et al

in Proceedings of In the Wake of Plastics, Venice, October 13-15, 2015 (2015, October)

Anthropogenic debris (AB) contaminate oceans and affect marine organisms in several ways. Plastic production is constantly increasing and it is estimated that 10% of this production end in the seas. As a ... [more ▼]

Anthropogenic debris (AB) contaminate oceans and affect marine organisms in several ways. Plastic production is constantly increasing and it is estimated that 10% of this production end in the seas. As a consequence, plastic is considered as an emerging contaminant and ingestions by organisms are increasingly reported. Microdebris (< 5mm) are available for a high range of organisms, including planktivorous fish, such as the European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus). Planktivorous fish have a particular gill basket, with long and tight gill rakers, related to their diet. Upon these gill rakers, small structures called denticles are present. These gill rakers act as a net to trap organic particles and AB. The aim of our study was to correlate sizes of AB ingested with the mesh constituted by the gill rakers and associated structures. Fifteen stomach contents were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and particles were measured. Five gill arches were observed with a scanning electron microscope. Cellulose fibers and microplastics were the most AB ingested. Comparing to other Clupeiformes (pilchard and Atlantic herring), anchovies have more denticles on each gill rakers (personal data). AB ingestion by fish is poorly studied and impacts of AB are not much understood. Clupeiformes play a major role in marine ecosystems and is the most consumed order by humans. As the branchial basket constitutes a food selective apparatus, more morphological studies dealing with AB ingestion on Clupeiformes are needed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVariation in swim bladder drumming sounds from three doradid catfish species with similar sonic morphologies
Boyle, Kelly; Riepe, Ségolène; Bolen, Géraldine ULg et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2015), 218

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the trophic strategy on the eco-functional diversification of a coral reef fish family
Gajdzik, Laura ULg; Aguilar-Medrano, Rosalia; Parmentier, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2015, September)

The analyses of the role of trophic strategies as promoter or constraint on processes of diversification remain understudied, especially in fish. The Pomacentridae (damselfishes), a species-rich (394 ... [more ▼]

The analyses of the role of trophic strategies as promoter or constraint on processes of diversification remain understudied, especially in fish. The Pomacentridae (damselfishes), a species-rich (394 species) and worldwide distributed reef fish family, include three main trophic guilds: (1) pelagic zooplankton feeders, (2) benthic feeders grazing on turf algae or biting polyps and (3) an intermediate group feeding on zooplankton, small benthic invertebrates and algae. Our study aims to analyze the role of the trophic strategies in the eco-functional diversity of Pomacentridae. Due to its feeding versatility, we hypothesize that the intermediate trophic group is the most successful group in terms of eco-functional diversity through evolutionary time. To target our aim, we compiled detailed dietary, environmental and behavioral data for 201 pomacentrid species, and compared the eco-functional diversity among trophic guilds. Various metrics, such as functional entity (i.e. unique combinations of functional traits) and functional richness revealed that the intermediate trophic group exhibited the lowest diversity. Then, we used time-calibrated phylogenies and comparative methods to evaluate the impact of trophic strategies on the tempo of ecological diversification. Results were consistent and the lowest rate of diversification was found for the intermediate trophic group. Our study shows that a generalist trophic strategy does not promote ecological diversification but being specialized may increase the ability to evolve greater diversity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSound production in piranhas and relatives: comparisons between species
Melotte, Geoffrey ULg; Michel, Christian ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

Poster (2015, September)

Acoustic communication plays an important role in the life of many teleost species where it is mainly involved in agonistic and/or courtship behavior. Despite the large number of Serrasalmidae species (92 ... [more ▼]

Acoustic communication plays an important role in the life of many teleost species where it is mainly involved in agonistic and/or courtship behavior. Despite the large number of Serrasalmidae species (92), sound production has been described only in the genera Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus. The aim of this study was first to investigate the sound producing abilities of different Serrasalmidae species and then to describe and understand the corresponding mechanisms. One herbivorous species, Piaractus brachypomus, produces sounds composed of a single pulse. The mechanism would involve the vibration of the bladder due to the hypaxial musculature contraction. In contrast, the calls emitted by Serrasalmus rhombeus, Serrasalmus compressus, Serrasalmus marginatus, Serrasalmus elongatus, Pygocentrus nattereri and Pristobrycon eigenmanni are all harmonic sounds composed of several pulses without inter-pulse interval. They all show the same kind of mechanism: the sound results from the forced vibration of the swimbladder following the contraction of sonic muscles that are attached to a perpendicular tendon surrounding ventrally the bladder. A last species, Pygopristis denticulata, is able to produce another type of sounds. It consists of several pulses with irregular pulse period and is likely produced by a sonic muscle inserting on the skull and on the rostral part of the swimbladder. The relatively high diversity of sound types and mechanisms in Serrasalmidae will be used in the future to understand the evolutionary development of this particular behavior. Do the mechanisms evolve separately or is there a continuity between them? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (25 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDetection of anthropogenic particles in fish stomachs: an isolation method adapted to identification by Raman spectroscopy
Collard, France ULg; Gilbert, Bernard ULg; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology (2015), 69

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (40 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIsolation and identification of anthropogenic particles in fish stomachs by Raman spectroscopy: a new method
Collard, France ULg; Gilbert, Bernard ULg; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2015, August)

Microplastic particles (MP) contaminate oceans and affect marine organisms in several ways. Ingestion combined with food intake is generally reported. However, data interpretation is often circumvented by ... [more ▼]

Microplastic particles (MP) contaminate oceans and affect marine organisms in several ways. Ingestion combined with food intake is generally reported. However, data interpretation is often circumvented by the difficulty to separate MP from bulk samples. Visual examination is often used as one or the only step to sort these particles. However, color, size and shape are insufficient and often unreliable criteria. Here we present an isolation method of MP specially adapted to a subsequent analysis by Raman spectroscopy. This method avoids fluorescence problems allowing the identification anthropogenic particles (AP) from stomach contents of fish by Raman spectroscopy. It was validated with commercial samples of microplastics and cotton along with stomach contents from three different Clupeiformes fishes: Clupea harengus, Sardina pilchardus and Engraulis encrasicolus. The optimized digestion and isolation protocol showed no visible impact on microplastics and cotton particles while the spectroscopic analysis allowed precise identification of microplastics and textile fibers. This approach allowed us to isolate 35 particles. These were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy: eleven were microplastics and thirteen were made of cellulose or lignin, or both (mostly fibers). Some particles were not identified but contained artificial colorants. This isolation protocol will help to assess the presence, quantity and composition of AP in planktivorous fish stomachs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 146 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFrom the ocean to a reef habitat: How do the larvae of coral reef fishes find their way home? A state of art on the latest advances
Barth, P; Berenshtein, I; Besson, M et al

in Vie et Milieu (2015), 65(2), 91-100

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (6 ULg)