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See detailA novel mutation of the luteinizing hormone/choionic gonadotrophin receptor gene leading to Leydig cell hypoplasia type I
Potorac, Iulia ULg; Rivero-Müller, A; Pintiaux, Axelle ULg et al

in Symposium "Perspectives in Endocrinology" - 5ème édition (2015, February 07)

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See detailChanges in pubertal timing: Past views, Recast issues
Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre ULg; Domine, Françoise; Glowacz, Fabienne ULg et al

in Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Carel, Jean-Claude; Christen, Yves (Eds.) Brain Crosstalk in Puberty in Adolescence (2015)

Abstract The aim of this article is to review some common opinions on changes in pubertal timing and shed new light both on the indicators used in assessing pubertal timing and the underlying mechanisms ... [more ▼]

Abstract The aim of this article is to review some common opinions on changes in pubertal timing and shed new light both on the indicators used in assessing pubertal timing and the underlying mechanisms. While emphasis is usually on advancement in timing of female puberty, it appears that timing also changes in males, both towards earliness for the initial pubertal stages and towards lateness for the final stages. Such findings suggest that the environmental influences on pubertal timing are more complex than initially thought. Moreover, self-evaluated pubertal timing versus peers provides information that is not always consistent with observations at physical examination, suggesting that both perspectives should be considered, especially when studying the correlation between pubertal timing and psychosocial aspects. The mechanisms of changes in pubertal timing may involve both central neuroendocrine control and peripheral effects in tissues targeted by gonadal steroids. Though energy availability is certainly a clue to the mechanism of pubertal development, changes in the control of both energy balance and control of reproduction may vary under the influence of common determinants such as endocrine-disrupting chemicals. These effects can take place right before puberty as well as much earlier, during fetal and neonatal life. Finally, environmental factors can interact with genetic factors in determining changes in pubertal timing. Therefore, the variance in pubertal timing is no longer to be considered under the absolutely separate control of environmental and genetic determinants.  [less ▲]

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See detailSexually dimorphic effect of gestational exposure to BPA on DNA methylation pattern in the rat placenta
FUDVOYE, Julie ULg; Dehan, Pierre ULg; Trooskens, Gheert et al

Conference (2014, October 27)

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See detailA novel mutation of the luteinizing hormone/choionic gonadotrophin receptor gene leading to Leydig cell hypoplasia type I
Potorac, Iulia ULg; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo; Pintiaux, Axelle ULg et al

in Abstract book - 24th Meeting of the Belgian Endocrine Society (2014, October 18)

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See detailPubertal timing after neonatal diethylstilbestrol exposure in female rats: Neuroendocrine vs peripheral effects and additive role of prenatal food restriction.
Franssen, Delphine ULg; Ioannou, Yiannis S.; Alvarez-Real, Alexandra et al

in Reproductive toxicology (Elmsford, N.Y.) (2014), (44), 63-72

We studied the effects of neonatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) on pubertal timing in female rats. We examined associated neuroendocrine changes and effects of prenatal food restriction. Age at ... [more ▼]

We studied the effects of neonatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) on pubertal timing in female rats. We examined associated neuroendocrine changes and effects of prenatal food restriction. Age at vaginal opening was advanced after exposure to 10mug/kg/d of DES and delayed after 1mug/kg/d (subcutaneous injections). Using this lower dose, pulsatile GnRH secretion was slower at 25 days of age. Both doses reduced KiSS1 mRNA levels at 15 days of age. Using functional Kisspeptin promoter assay, 1 or 10muM DES reduced or increased KISS1 transcription, respectively. Leptin stimulatory effect on GnRH secretion in vitro (15 days of age) was reduced after prenatal food restriction and neonatal DES exposure (higher dose), both effects being cumulative. Thus, alterations in pubertal timing by DES neonatally are not unequivocally toward precocity, the level of exposure being critical. We provide evidence of neuroendocrine disruption and interaction with prenatal food availability. [less ▲]

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See detailNormal minipuberty in a patient with DAX-1 mutation: additional evidence of a differential role for DAX-1 during development?
FUDVOYE, Julie ULg; BOURGUIGNON, Jean-Pierre ULg; PARENT, Anne-Simone ULg

Poster (2014, March)

Classically, mutations in the DAX-1 gene cause an adrenal hypoplasia congenita associated with adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. However, mini-puberty onset seems to be normal in ... [more ▼]

Classically, mutations in the DAX-1 gene cause an adrenal hypoplasia congenita associated with adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. However, mini-puberty onset seems to be normal in those patients suggesting a normal function of the pituitary-gonadal axis during the perinatal period. [less ▲]

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See detailEndocrine-disrupting chemicals and human growth and maturation: a focus on early critical windows of exposure.
FUDVOYE, Julie ULg; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre ULg; Parent, Anne-Simone ULg

in Vitamins and hormones (2014), 94

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances that interfere with hormone synthesis, metabolism, or action. In addition, some of them could cause epigenetic alterations of DNA that can be ... [more ▼]

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances that interfere with hormone synthesis, metabolism, or action. In addition, some of them could cause epigenetic alterations of DNA that can be transmitted to the following generations. Because the developing organism is highly dependent on sex steroids and thyroid hormones for its maturation, the fetus and the child are very sensitive to any alteration of their hormonal environment. An additional concern about that early period of life comes from the shaping of the homeostatic mechanisms that takes place also at that time with involvement of epigenetic mechanisms along with the concept of fetal origin of health and disease. In this chapter, we will review the studies reporting effects of EDCs on human development. Using a translational approach, we will review animal studies that can shed light on some mechanisms of action of EDCs on the developing organism. We will focus on the major hormone-dependent stages of development: fetal growth, sexual differentiation, puberty, brain development, and energy balance. We will also discuss the possible epigenetic effects of EDCs on human development. [less ▲]

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See detailLA PERTURBATION ENDOCRINIENNE : entre enjeux de recherche, enjeux de santé publique et enjeux de pratique quotidienne
FUDVOYE, Julie ULg; Franssen, Delphine ULg; Naveau, Elise et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014)

Epidemiological and experimental data highlight the fetal and early postnatal life as critical periods for the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), since exposure to EDCs during these periods ... [more ▼]

Epidemiological and experimental data highlight the fetal and early postnatal life as critical periods for the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), since exposure to EDCs during these periods can predispose to disease later in life. EDCs’ effects include disorders of the reproductive system throughout life (abnormalities of sexual differentiation, infertility or subfertility and some neoplasia) and disorders of energy balance (obesity and metabolic syndrome). They could also influence the development of the cerebral cortex. However, the demonstration of the involvement of a single EDC remains difficult in human since we are virtually exposed to a mixture of several ubiquitous EDCs which are variably persistent in the environment and the body and have lifelong consequences. Moreover, since their dose-response relationship can be non-monotonic, setting a threshold dose for EDCs effects has become meaningless. Pregnant women, newborns and young children appear to be mostly at risk. However, the role of the physician remains difficult and raises several questions: how can we formulate justified, applicable and updated recommendations that are not counterproductive or alarmist…in a society that has to take the necessary steps to regulate production and protect the population? [less ▲]

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See detailL'hyperthyroidie neonatale: clinique et prise en charge therapeutique.
Petignot, S.; NYAMUGABO MUNYERE NKANA, Kindja ULg; Socin, H. Valdes et al

in Revue medicale de Liege (2013), 68(10), 531-6

Neonatal hyperthyroidism is a rare pathology, most often the consequence of Graves' disease in the mother. Around 0.2% of pregnant women have Graves disease and 1 to 2% of newborns of mother with Graves ... [more ▼]

Neonatal hyperthyroidism is a rare pathology, most often the consequence of Graves' disease in the mother. Around 0.2% of pregnant women have Graves disease and 1 to 2% of newborns of mother with Graves' disease. This article will describe the case of 4 newborns who have been diagnosed and treated in CHU-NDB between 2007 and 2011. The second part will focus on the new recommendations about the management of these young patients from foetal period to birth. [less ▲]

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See detailDepletion of the p43 Mitochondrial T3 Receptor Increases Sertoli Cell Proliferation in Mice
Fumel, Betty; Roy, Stéphanie; Fourchecourt, Sophie et al

in PLoS ONE (2013)

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See detailDelayed puberty in a girl due to an inactivating mutation of the LH receptor
FUDVOYE, Julie ULg; PARENT, Anne-Simone ULg; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre ULg

Poster (2012, March)

We report the case of a 46 XY patient with a disorder of sex differentiation (DSD) caused by an inactivating mutation of the LH receptor. Mutations of genes involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal ... [more ▼]

We report the case of a 46 XY patient with a disorder of sex differentiation (DSD) caused by an inactivating mutation of the LH receptor. Mutations of genes involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function are rare but they provide an experience of nature for understanding the physiology and the pathophysiology of gonadotropins actions. There arise from correlation between the phenotypes and genotypes in those unique conditions. Management of this particular patient with no LH activity involves oestrogen replacement therapy to induce breast development together with a gonadectomy due to the risk of gonadoblastoma in streak gonads. [less ▲]

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See detailSynCAM1, a synaptic adhesion molecule, is expressed in astrocytes and contributes to erbB4 receptor-mediated control of
Sandau, Ursula; Mungenast, Ally; Alderman, Z et al

in Endocrinology (2011), 152

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See detailEarly developmental actions of endocrine disruptors on the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex.
Parent, Anne-Simone ULg; Naveau, Elise; GERARD, Arlette ULg et al

in Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part B, Critical Reviews (2011), 14(5-7), 328-45

Sex steroids and thyroid hormones play a key role in the development of the central nervous system. The critical role of these hormonal systems may explain the sensitivity of the hypothalamus, the ... [more ▼]

Sex steroids and thyroid hormones play a key role in the development of the central nervous system. The critical role of these hormonal systems may explain the sensitivity of the hypothalamus, the cerebral cortex, and the hippocampus to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC). This review examines the evidence for endocrine disruption of glial-neuronal functions in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex. Focus was placed on two well-studied EDC, the insecticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). DDT is involved in neuroendocrine disruption of the reproductive axis, whereas polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) interact with both the thyroid hormone- and sex steroid-dependent systems and disturb the neuroendocrine control of reproduction and development of hippocampus and cortex. These results highlight the impact of EDC on the developing nervous system and the need for more research in this area. [less ▲]

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