References of "Pans, Alain"
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See detailJoint Mobility in Adult Patients with Groin Hernias
Pans, Alain ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg

in Hernia : the Journal of Hernias & Abdominal Wall Surgery (2003), 7(1), 21-4

The basic mechanisms of hernia formation remain mostly unknown, but several studies suggest that a connective-tissue pathology, affecting mainly the collagen metabolism, could play a role in the genesis ... [more ▼]

The basic mechanisms of hernia formation remain mostly unknown, but several studies suggest that a connective-tissue pathology, affecting mainly the collagen metabolism, could play a role in the genesis of groin hernias. It would be interesting to know if this pathology can express some clinical signs other than the hernia. Our study focused on the joint mobility and the diagnostic criteria for benign joint hypermobility syndrome. Sixty male adult patients with inguinal hernias and 62 control subjects without hernias, age-matched, were compared, taking into account anamnestic criteria (family history of groin hernia, joint sprain, joint dislocation, skin striae, major arthralgia) and joint mobility. This was assessed by using Beighton criteria and measuring the range of movement of five joints (extension of the fifth finger, thumb, wrist, elbow, and knee). The frequency of the positive anamnestic criteria was not statistically different between the two groups. Nevertheless, a family history of groin hernia was observed in 25% of the hernia patients, against 16% in the control subjects ( P=0.23). The mean Beighton score was 0.30 in the hernia patients and 0.29 in the control population. The movement range of the five examined joints was similar in the two groups. In conclusion, patients with a groin hernia presented neither joint hypermobility nor clinical evidence of a benign joint hypermobility syndrome. Although abnormal collagen metabolism is likely implicated in hernia formation, this pathology does not seem to have clinical repercussion on joint mobility. [less ▲]

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See detailBiochemical Study of Collagen in Adult Groin Hernias
Pans, Alain ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg; Lapiere, C. M. et al

in Journal of Surgical Research (2001), 95(2), 107-13

BACKGROUND: Previous works have suggested that a defect in collagen fiber structure may play a role in inguinal hernia formation. These studies focused mainly on the rectus sheath or the skin, while only ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Previous works have suggested that a defect in collagen fiber structure may play a role in inguinal hernia formation. These studies focused mainly on the rectus sheath or the skin, while only few reports dealt with the transversalis fascia. According to these findings and to our previous biomechanical and histological studies suggesting that a connective tissue pathology could play a role in the genesis of groin hernias, we performed a biochemical investigation of the collagen in the transversalis fascia and rectus sheath. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The samples were collected from 40 adult patients with uni- or bilateral hernias and from 20 control subjects without hernia (autopsies and organ donors). A constant area of tissue was taken by using a calibrator. The wet and dry weights per 100 mm(2) were determined and the total collagen concentration as well as its sequential extractibility in NaCl, acetic acid, and pepsin was measured. The ratios of alpha(1)/alpha(2) chains (I) and of type I/III collagen were assessed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. RESULTS: Samples collected in the control and patient sheaths showed an increased wet weight per 100 mm(2) in the patients. The wet and dry weights per unit area were increased in the patient fascias. The collagen concentration was increased in the indirect hernias. The fascias from the direct hernias (DH) presented a significantly increased collagen extractibility after pepsin digestion (5.6%), when compared to the control fascias (2.6%). The extractibility was 3.4% in the nonherniated (NH) sides. The qualitative study (ratios alpha(1)/alpha(2) (I) and I/III collagen) showed no difference between the fascia groups. CONCLUSIONS: The significant increase of collagen extractibility with pepsin in the DH fascias and at a lesser degree in the NH fascias suggests that molecular alterations of collagen could be involved in the genesis of groin hernias. This connective tissue pathology would express preferentially its effects in the inguinal region, since we have observed no major difference between the rectus sheaths of controls and those of patients. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunohistochemical study of the rectus sheath and transversalis facia in adult groin hernias
PANS, Alain ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg

in Hernia : the Journal of Hernias & Abdominal Wall Surgery (1999), 3

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See detailBiomechanical assessment of the transversalis fascia and rectus abdominis aponeurosis in inguinal herniation - Preliminary results
PANS, Alain ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Hernia : the Journal of Hernias & Abdominal Wall Surgery (1997), 1

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See detailThe Impact of Renal Revascularisation on Renal Dysfunction
Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Jeusette, F.; Pans, Alain ULg et al

in European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery : The Official Journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery (1995), 10(3), 330-7

AIM: To determine the value of kidney revascularisation in patients with impaired renal function and correctable renal artery stenosis, the authors reviewed their surgical experience from 1978 to 1990 ... [more ▼]

AIM: To determine the value of kidney revascularisation in patients with impaired renal function and correctable renal artery stenosis, the authors reviewed their surgical experience from 1978 to 1990. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study population included 23 patients with ischaemic nephropathy whose preoperative baseline creatinine level exceeded 20 mg/l (range 21-65 mg/l). This represents 20% of all patients operated on for renal artery disease during the same time interval. Preoperative risk profile, operative mortality, impact on hypertension and on renal function, and late survival were analysed. Renal function response to kidney revascularisation was defined as favourable (20% or more reduction of serum creatinine), moderate (stabilised serum creatinine values) or bad (further deterioration of renal function). All patients had atherosclerotic renal artery disease, involving a solitary kidney in five, both kidneys in 15 and one of the two kidneys in three patients. Hypertension was present in 74%. Revascularisation was unilateral in 10, bilateral in nine and associated with controlateral nephrectomy in four patients. RESULTS: Four patients died postoperatively (three myocardial infarctions, one stroke). Four patients needed postoperative short-term dialysis. After operation, renal function improved in 13, stabilised in six and deteriorated in four patients (of whom two died). Follow-up among the survivors averaged 46 months. The mean serum creatinine value at last follow-up visit was 26.2 mg/l, a decrease of 7.7 mg/l compared to preoperative values (p < 0.05). Overall, 69% of azotemic patients submitted to renal revascularisation manifested a favourable response (45% improved and 24% stabilised). Three patients required long-term dialysis. The 5-year survival rate was 48%. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that kidney revascularisation in patients with ischaemic nephropathy can restore or stabilise renal function, preventing evolution and end-stage renal disease and dialysis dependency. [less ▲]

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