References of "Munhoven, Guy"
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See detailMiddle Miocene climate and vegetation models and their validation with proxy data
Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; Utescher, Torsten; Erdei, Boglarka et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2017), 467

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See detailEnhanced silicate weathering of tropical shelf sediments exposed during glacial lowstands: a sink for atmospheric CO2
Wan, Shiming; Clift, Peter D.; Zhao, Debo et al

in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (2017), 200

Atmospheric CO2 and global climate are closely coupled. Since 800 ka CO2 concentrations have been up to 50% higher during interglacial compared to glacial periods. Because of its dependence on temperature ... [more ▼]

Atmospheric CO2 and global climate are closely coupled. Since 800 ka CO2 concentrations have been up to 50% higher during interglacial compared to glacial periods. Because of its dependence on temperature, humidity, and erosion rates, chemical weathering of exposed silicate minerals was suggested to have dampened these cyclic variations of atmospheric composition. Cooler and drier conditions and lower non-glacial erosion rates suppressed in situ chemical weathering rates during glacial periods. However, using systematic variations in major element geochemistry, Sr-Nd isotopes and clay mineral records from Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1143 and 1144 in the South China Sea spanning the last 1.1 Ma, we show that sediment deposited during glacial periods was more weathered than sediment delivered during interglacials. We attribute this to subaerial exposure and weathering of unconsolidated shelf sediments during glacial sealevel lowstands. Our estimates suggest that enhanced silicate weathering of tropical shelf sediments exposed during glacial lowstands can account for ~9% of the carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere during the glacial and thus represent a significant part of the observed glacial-interglacial variation of ~80 ppmv. As a result, if similar magnitudes can be identified in other tropical shelf-slope systems, the effects of increased sediment exposure and subsequent silicate weathering during lowstands could have potentially enhanced the drawdown of atmospheric CO2 during cold stages of the Quaternary. This in turn would have caused an intensification of glacial cycles. We attribute this to subaerial exposure and weathering of unconsolidated shelf sediments during glacial sealevel lowstands. Our estimates suggest that enhanced silicate weathering of tropical shelf sediments exposed during glacial lowstands can account for ~9% of the carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere during the glacial and thus represent a significant part of the observed glacial-interglacial variation of ~80 ppmv. As a result, if similar magnitudes can be identified in other tropical shelf-slope systems, the effects of increased sediment exposure and subsequent silicate weathering during lowstands could have potentially enhanced the drawdown of atmospheric CO2 during cold stages of the Quaternary. This in turn would have caused an intensification of glacial cycles. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing the impact of climate change on terrestrial plants in Europe using a Dynamic Vegetation Model driven by EURO-CORDEX projections
Dury, Marie ULg; Hambuckers, Alain ULg; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg et al

Poster (2016, September 26)

While the combination of warmer and drier mean climatic conditions can have severe impacts on ecosystems, extreme events like droughts or heat waves that break the gradual climate change can have more ... [more ▼]

While the combination of warmer and drier mean climatic conditions can have severe impacts on ecosystems, extreme events like droughts or heat waves that break the gradual climate change can have more long-term consequences on ecosystem composition, functioning and carbon storage. Hence, it is essential to assess the changes in climate variability and the changes in frequency of extreme events projected for the future. Here, the process-based dynamic vegetation model CARAIB DVM was used to evaluate and analyse how future climate and extreme events will affect European terrestrial plants. To quantify the uncertainties in climatic projections and their potential impacts on ecosystems, the vegetation model was driven with the outputs of different regional climatic models, nested in CMIP5 GCM projections for the EURO-CORDEX project: ALADIN53 (Météo-France/CNRM), RACMO22E (KNMI), RCA4 (SMHI) and REMO2009 (MPI-CSC) RCMs. These daily climatic scenarios are at a high spatial resolution (0.11°, ≈ 12 km). CARAIB simulations were performed across Europe over the historical period 1971-2005 and the future period 2006-2100 under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. We simulated a set of 99 individual species (47 herbs, 12 shrubs and 40 trees) representing the major European ecosystem flora. First, we analysed the climatic variability simulated by the climatic models over the historical period and compared it with the observed climatic variability. Then, we evaluated change in climatic variability and extreme events projected by the climatic models for the end of the century. Finally, we assessed the change in species productivity and abundance. We evaluated the severity of projected productivity change for the period 2070-2099 relative to their current productivity variability (period 1970-1999). Mean changes were considered severe if they exceed observed variability. The projections of potential shifts in species distributions are directly dedicated to current forest management. [less ▲]

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See detailResponse to droughts and heat waves of the productivity of natural and agricultural ecosystems in Europe within ISI-MIP2 historical simulations
François, Louis ULg; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; Dury, Marie ULg et al

Conference (2016, June 23)

According to the projections of climate models, extreme events such as droughts and heat waves are expected to become more frequent and more severe in the future. Such events are known to severely impact ... [more ▼]

According to the projections of climate models, extreme events such as droughts and heat waves are expected to become more frequent and more severe in the future. Such events are known to severely impact the productivity of both natural and agricultural ecosystems, and hence to affect ecosystem services such as crop yield and ecosystem carbon sequestration potential. Dynamic vegetation models are conventional tools to evaluate the productivity and carbon sequestration of ecosystems and their response to climate change. However, how far are these models able to correctly represent the sensitivity of ecosystems to droughts and heat waves? How do the responses of natural and agricultural ecosystems compare to each other, in terms of drought-induced changes in productivity and carbon sequestration? In this contribution, we use ISI-MIP2 model historical simulations from the biome sector. Eight dynamic vegetation models have participated in the biome sector intercomparison of ISI-MIP2: CARAIB, DLEM, JULES, LPJ-GUESS, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, VEGAS and VISIT. We focus the analysis on well-marked droughts or heat waves that occured in Europe after 1970, such as the 1976, 2003 and 2010 events. For most recent studied events, the model results are compared to the response observed at several eddy covariance sites in Europe, and, at a lager scale, to the drops in crop productivities reported in national statistics or to the drought impacts retrieved from satellite data (Terra MODIS instrument). [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing the Risk of Ecosystem Disruption in Europe using a Dynamic Vegetation Model driven by CMIP5 Regional Climatic Projections from EURO-CORDEX
Dury, Marie ULg; François, Louis ULg; Hambuckers, Alain ULg et al

Conference (2016, April 18)

While the combination of warmer and drier mean climatic conditions can have severe impacts on ecosystems, extreme events like droughts or heat waves that break the gradual climate change can have more ... [more ▼]

While the combination of warmer and drier mean climatic conditions can have severe impacts on ecosystems, extreme events like droughts or heat waves that break the gradual climate change can have more long-term consequences on ecosystem composition, functioning and carbon storage. Hence, it is essential to assess the changes in climate variability and the changes in frequency of extreme events projected for the future. Ecosystems could not be in a condition to adapt to these new conditions and might be disrupted. Here, the process-based dynamic vegetation model CARAIB DVM was used to evaluate and analyze how future climate and extreme events will affect European ecosystems. To quantify the uncertainties in the climatic projections and in their potential impacts on ecosystems, the vegetation model was driven with the outputs of different regional climatic models (RCMs), nested in CMIP5 GCM projections for the EURO-CORDEX project: ALADIN53 (Météo-France/CNRM), RACMO22E (KNMI), RCA4 (SMHI) and REMO2009 (MPI-CSC) RCMs. These climatic projections are at a high spatial resolution (0.11-degree, ≈ 12 km). CARAIB simulations were performed across Europe over the historical period 1951-2005 and the future period 2006-2100 under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. We simulated a set of 99 individual species (47 herbs, 12 shrubs and 40 trees) representing the major European ecosystem flora. First, we analyzed the climatic variability simulated by the climatic models over the historical period and compared it with the observed climatic variability. None of these climatic models can reproduce accurately the present natural climatic variability. Then, to assess the risk of ecosystem disruption in the future and to identify the vulnerable areas in Europe, we created an index combining several CARAIB outputs: runoff, mean NPP, soil turnover, burned area, appearance and disappearance of species. We evaluated the severity of change projected for these variables (period 2070-2099) relative to their current variability (period 1970-1999). Mean changes were considered severe if they exceed observed variability. The highest values of the index were found in southern Europe, indicating that the amplitude of the expected ecosystem changes largely exceeds current interannual variability in this area. This spatial risk index and the projections of potential shifts in species distributions are directly dedicated to current forest management to guide in planting or in assisted migration. [less ▲]

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See detailAbel inversion method for cometary atmospheres.
Hubert, Benoît ULg; Opitom, Cyrielle ULg; Hutsemekers, Damien ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2016, April 01), 18

Remote observation of cometary atmospheres produces a measurement of the cometary emissions integrated along the line of sight joining the observing instrument and the gas of the coma. This integration is ... [more ▼]

Remote observation of cometary atmospheres produces a measurement of the cometary emissions integrated along the line of sight joining the observing instrument and the gas of the coma. This integration is the so-called Abel transform of the local emission rate. We develop a method specifically adapted to the inversion of the Abel transform of cometary emissions, that retrieves the radial profile of the emission rate of any unabsorbed emission, under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry of the coma. The method uses weighted least squares fitting and analytical results. A Tikhonov regularization technique is applied to reduce the possible effects of noise and ill-conditioning, and standard error propagation techniques are implemented. Several theoretical tests of the inversion techniques are carried out to show its validity and robustness, and show that the method is only weakly dependent on any constant offset added to the data, which reduces the dependence of the retrieved emission rate on the background subtraction. We apply the method to observations of three different comets observed using the TRAPPIST instrument: 103P/ Hartley 2, F6/ Lemmon and A1/ Siding spring. We show that the method retrieves realistic emission rates, and that characteristic lengths and production rates can be derived from the emission rate for both CN and C2 molecules. We show that the emission rate derived from the observed flux of CN emission at 387 nm and from the C2 emission at 514.1 nm of comet Siding Spring both present an easily-identifiable shoulder that corresponds to the separation between pre- and post-outburst gas. As a general result, we show that diagnosing properties and features of the coma using the emission rate is easier than directly using the observed flux. We also determine the parameters of a Haser model fitting the inverted data and fitting the line-of-sight integrated observation, for which we provide the exact analytical expression of the line-of-sight integration of the Haser model. [less ▲]

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See detailInteractive comment on “Bottom RedOx Model (BROM, v.1.0): a coupled benthic-pelagic model for simulation of seasonal anoxia and its impact” by E. V. Yakushev et al.
Munhoven, Guy ULg

in Geoscientific Model Development Discussions [=GMDD] (2016)

The paper "Bottom RedOx Model (BROM, v.1.0): a coupled benthic-pelagic model for simulation of seasonal anoxia and its impact” by E. V. Yakushev et al. is discussed and reviewed.

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See detailPotential impact of the ice core Si weathering proxy CF4 on the carbon cycle during the last 800 kyr within the model BICYCLE-MEDUSA
Köhler, Peter; Munhoven, Guy ULg; Schmitt, Jochen

Conference (2016, February 09)

The potential impact of silicate weathering changes over the past 800,000 years, as derived from the ice-core CF4 proxy, on atmospheric CO2 is assessed with the carbon cycle model BICYCLE-MEDUSA.

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See detailWeathering fluxes in carbon cycle models on glacial time scales. Getting the fundamentals right.
Munhoven, Guy ULg

Conference (2016, February 09)

The role of continental weathering in the global carbon cycle is presented, focussing on the CO2 consumption and bicarbonate production rates. The different effects of silicate and carbonate weathering ... [more ▼]

The role of continental weathering in the global carbon cycle is presented, focussing on the CO2 consumption and bicarbonate production rates. The different effects of silicate and carbonate weathering are worked out to derive constraints that the combined carbon and alkalinity budgets have to fulfil. The influence of variations of continental weathering on atmospheric CO2 on glacial-interglacial time scales are analysed and illustrated with results from sensitivity tests carried out with the ocean carbon cycle model MBM-MEDUSA. [less ▲]

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See detailMiddle Miocene climate and vegetation models and their validation with proxy data
Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; Utescher, T.; Erdei, B. et al

Report (2016)

The Miocene is a relatively recent epoch of the Earth's history with warmer climate than today, particularly during the middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO, approximately 17-15Ma). Although the cause of ... [more ▼]

The Miocene is a relatively recent epoch of the Earth's history with warmer climate than today, particularly during the middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO, approximately 17-15Ma). Although the cause of the warming is probably not only attributable to CO2, but also to changes in orography and configuration of ocean gateways, this time interval represents an ideal case study to test the ability of climate models to simulate warm climates comparable to those that the Earth may experience in the near future. However, even with higher than present-day CO2 concentrations, the MMCO warming inferred from terrestrial proxy data has been difficult to reproduce in climate models.Since fossil flora do not provide direct information on climate, but on flora and vegetation, climate model results are generally compared to climate reconstructions obtained from the fossil flora. In this study, we apply an alternative method by simulating palaeovegetation from the outputs of the climate model, using a dynamic vegetation model. Model vegetation reconstruction can then be compared to the vegetation cover indicated by the fossil flora record at the various localities, provided that a common classification of plant functional types (PFTs) is used for the data and the model. Here, we reconstruct the vegetation of the middle Miocene with the global dynamic vegetation model CARAIB, using the climatologies derived from five atmospheric general circulation models. The reliability of the simulations is examined on a presence/absence basis of PFTs by comparison of vegetation reconstructions to palaeoflora data recorded in the Northern Hemisphere and the Tropics.This comparison provides an overall agreement around 60% between model and data, when all sites and tree types are considered. Three model simulations out of five show to be better at predicting the absence than the presence. The presence of warm-temperate mixed forests in the middle latitudes, dominated by broadleaved deciduous warm temperate and subtropical trees is generally well reproduced in CARAIB simulations. However, poor agreement is obtained for the presence of tropical PFTs out of the Tropics and for warm PFTs at latitudes northward of 50°N, where climate models remain too cold to produce assemblages of trees consistent with the data. Nevertheless, the model-data comparison performed here highlights several mismatches that could result not only from missing feedbacks in the climate simulations, but also from the data. The results of the likelihood analysis on presence/absence of PFTs illustrate the uncertainties in the PFT classification of the Neogene floral records. The coexistence of some PFTs in the palaeovegetation data is impossible to reproduce in the vegetation model simulations because of the climatic definition of the modern PFTs. This result indicates either a bias in the identification of modern analogues for fossil plant taxa, or a possible evolution of environmental requirements of certain plants. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailModelled interglacial carbon cycle dynamics during the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11
Kleinen, T.; Brovkin, V.; Munhoven, Guy ULg

in Climate of the Past (2016), 12(12), 2145--2160

Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials – the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 – are investigated using an earth system model of intermediate ... [more ▼]

Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials – the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 – are investigated using an earth system model of intermediate complexity, which we extended with process-based modules to consider two slow carbon cycle processes – peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation (coral reef formation). For all three interglacials, model simulations considering peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation substantially improve the agreement between model results and ice core CO2 reconstructions in comparison to a carbon cycle set-up neglecting these processes. This enables us to model the trends in atmospheric CO2, with modelled trends similar to the ice core data, forcing the model only with orbital and sea level changes. During the Holocene, anthropogenic CO2 emissions are required to match the observed rise in atmospheric CO2 after 3 ka BP but are not relevant before this time. Our model experiments show a considerable improvement in the modelled CO2 trends by the inclusion of the slow carbon cycle processes, allowing us to explain the CO2 evolution during the Holocene and two recent interglacials consistently using an identical model set-up. [less ▲]

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See detailAn inversion method for cometary atmospheres
Hubert, Benoît ULg; Opitom, Cyrielle ULg; Hutsemekers, Damien ULg et al

in Icarus (2016), 277

Remote observation of cometary atmospheres produces a measurement of the cometary emissions integrated along the line of sight. This integration is the so-called Abel transform of the local emission rate ... [more ▼]

Remote observation of cometary atmospheres produces a measurement of the cometary emissions integrated along the line of sight. This integration is the so-called Abel transform of the local emission rate. The observation is generally interpreted under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry of the coma. Under that hypothesis, the Abel transform can be inverted. We derive a numerical inversion method adapted to cometary atmospheres using both analytical results and least squares fitting techniques. This method, derived under the usual hypothesis of spherical symmetry, allows us to retrieve the radial distribution of the emission rate of any unabsorbed emission, which is the fundamental, physically meaningful quantity governing the observation. A Tikhonov regularization technique is also applied to reduce the possibly deleterious effects of the noise present in the observation and to warrant that the problem remains well posed. Standard error propagation techniques are included in order to estimate the uncertainties affecting the retrieved emission rate. Several theoretical tests of the inversion techniques are carried out to show its validity and robustness. In particular, we show that the Abel inversion of real data is only weakly sensitive to an offset applied to the input flux, which implies that the method, applied to the study of a cometary atmosphere, is only weakly dependent on uncertainties on the sky background which has to be subtracted from the raw observations of the coma. We apply the method to observations of three different comets observed using the TRAPPIST telescope: 103P/ Hartley 2, F6/ Lemmon and A1/ Siding Spring. We show that the method retrieves realistic emission rates, and that characteristic lengths and production rates can be derived from the emission rate for both CN and C2 molecules. We show that the retrieved characteristic lengths can differ from those obtained from a direct least squares fitting over the observed flux of radiation, and that discrepancies can be reconciled for by correcting this flux by an offset (to which the inverse Abel transform is nearly not sensitive). The A1/Siding Spring observations were obtained very shortly after the comet produced an outburst, and we show that the emission rate derived from the observed flux of CN emission at 387 nm and from the C2 emission at 514.1 nm both present an easily-identifiable shoulder that corresponds to the separation between pre- and post-outburst gas. As a general result, we show that diagnosing properties and features of the coma using the emission rate is easier than directly using the observed flux, because the Abel transform produces a smoothing that blurs the signatures left by features present in the coma. We also determine the parameters of a Haser model fitting the inverted data and fitting the line-of-sight integrated observation, for which we provide the exact analytical expression of the line-of-sight integration of the Haser model. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing the Risk of Ecosystem Disruption in Europe using a Dynamic Vegetation Model driven by CMIP5 Regional Climatic Projections from EURO-CORDEX
Dury, Marie ULg; Hambuckers, Alain ULg; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg et al

Conference (2015, December 18)

While the combination of warmer and drier mean climatic conditions can have severe impacts on ecosystems, extreme events like droughts or heat waves that break the gradual climate change can have more ... [more ▼]

While the combination of warmer and drier mean climatic conditions can have severe impacts on ecosystems, extreme events like droughts or heat waves that break the gradual climate change can have more long-term consequences on ecosystem composition, functioning and carbon storage. Hence, it is essential to assess the changes in climatic variability and the changes in frequency of extreme events projected for the future. Ecosystems could not be in a condition to adapt to these new conditions and might be disrupted. Here, the process-based dynamic vegetation model CARAIB DVM was used to evaluate and analyze how future climate and extreme events will affect European ecosystems. To quantify the uncertainties in the climatic projections and in their potential impacts on ecosystems, the vegetation model was driven with the outputs of different regional climatic models (RCMs), nested in CMIP5 GCM projections for the EURO-CORDEX project. We used the ALADIN version 5.3 (Météo-France/CNRM) and other EURO-CORDEX RCMs. These climatic projections are at a high spatial resolution (0.11-degree, ~12 km). CARAIB simulations were performed across Europe over the historical period 1951-2005 and the future period 2006-2100 under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. We simulated a set of 99 individual species (47 herbs, 12 shrubs and 40 trees) representing the major European ecosystem flora. First, we analyzed the climatic variability simulated by the climatic models over the historical period and compared it with the observed climatic variability. None of these climatic models can reproduce accurately the present natural climatic variability. Then, to assess the risk of ecosystem disruption in the future and to identify the vulnerable areas in Europe, we created an index combining several CARAIB outputs: runoff, mean NPP, soil turnover, burned area, appearance and disappearance of species. We evaluated the severity of change projected for these variables (period 2071-2100) relative to their current variability (period 1961-1990). Mean changes were considered severe if they exceed observed variability. The highest values of the index were found in southern Europe, indicating that the amplitude of the expected ecosystem changes largely exceeds current interannual variability in this area. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysing the response of European ecosystems to droughts and heat waves within ISI-MIP2 simulations
Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; Dury, Marie ULg; François, Louis ULg et al

Conference (2015, December 14)

With unprecedented speed and extent, the future climate change can be expected to severely impact terrestrial ecosystems due to more frequent extreme events, such as droughts or heat waves. What will be ... [more ▼]

With unprecedented speed and extent, the future climate change can be expected to severely impact terrestrial ecosystems due to more frequent extreme events, such as droughts or heat waves. What will be the impacts of these extreme events on ecosystem functioning and structure? How far will net primary production be reduced by such events? What will be the impact on plant mortality? Could such events trigger changes in the abundance of plant species, thus leading to biome shifts? In this contribution, we propose to use ISI-MIP2 model historical simulations from the biome sector to analyse the response of ecosystems to droughts or heat waves, trying to understand the differences between several vegetation models (e.g. CARAIB, HYBRID, LPJ). The analysis will focus on Europe. It will compare and assess the model responses for a series of well-marked drought or heat wave events in the simulated historical period, such as those that occurred in 1976, 2003 or 2010. This analysis will be performed in terms of several important environmental variables, like soil water and hydric stress, runoff, PFT abundance, net primary productivity and biomass, fire frequency, turnover of soil organic matter, etc. Whenever possible, the response of the model will be compared to available data for the most recent well-marked events. Examples of data to be used are eddy covariance, satellite data (including leaf area and fire occurrence) or tree rings. [less ▲]

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See detailThe last four glacial cycles simulated with the CLIMBER-2 model
Ganopolski, Andrey; Brovkin, Victor; Calov, Reinhard et al

Conference (2015, March 19)

We present results from our simulation experiments for the last four glacial cycles with the Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) CLIMBER-2, with fully coupled ice-sheet and carbon cycle ... [more ▼]

We present results from our simulation experiments for the last four glacial cycles with the Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) CLIMBER-2, with fully coupled ice-sheet and carbon cycle components. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon cycle dynamics during recent interglacials
Kleinen, T.; Brovkin, V.; Munhoven, Guy ULg

in Climate of the Past Discussions (2015), 11(3), 1945-1983

Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials, the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11, are investigated using an Earth system Model of Intermediate ... [more ▼]

Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials, the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11, are investigated using an Earth system Model of Intermediate Complexity, which we extended with modules to dynamically determine two slow carbon cycle processes – peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation (coral reef formation). For all three interglacials, model simulations considering peat accumulation and shallow water CaCO3 sedimentation substantially improve the agreement between model results and ice core CO2 reconstructions in comparison to a carbon cycle setup neglecting these processes. This enables us to model the trends in atmospheric CO2, with modelled trends similar to the ice core data, forcing the model only with orbital and sea level changes. During the Holocene, anthropogenic CO2 emissions are required to match the observed rise in atmospheric CO2 after 3 ka BP, but are not relevant before this time. Therefore our model experiments show for the first time how the CO2 evolution during the Holocene and two recent interglacials can be explained consistently using an identical model setup. [less ▲]

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See detailInteractive comment on “Improved routines to model the ocean carbonate system: mocsy 1.0” by J. C. Orr and J.-M Epitalon
Munhoven, Guy ULg

in Geoscientific Model Development Discussions [=GMDD] (2014), 7

The manuscript "Improved routines to model the ocean carbonate system: mocsy 1.0" by J. C. Orr and J.-M Epitalon is reviewed and related issues and ideas are discussed.

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See detailCarbon and Other Biogeochemical Cycles
Ciais, Philippe; Sabine, Christopher; Bala, Govindasamy et al

in Stocker, T. F.; Qin, D.; Plattner, G.-K. (Eds.) et al Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2014)

The present perturbations of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as well as their past variations (coupled to climate variations) and their projected ... [more ▼]

The present perturbations of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as well as their past variations (coupled to climate variations) and their projected future evolutions over the 21st century are reviewed. [less ▲]

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