References of "Moutschen, Michel"
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See detailThe RIAD peptidomimetic inhibits HIV-1 replication in humanized NSG mice
Singh, Maneesh; Singh, Pratibha; Vaira, Dolores et al

in European Journal of Clinical Investigation (2014), 44(2), 146-152

Background Increased intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in T cells is associated with various immunodeficiency conditions including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Several ... [more ▼]

Background Increased intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in T cells is associated with various immunodeficiency conditions including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Several reports indicate a critical role of activated protein kinase A (PKA) in the susceptibility of cells to HIV infection. We have used a cell permeable, stable peptidomimetic version (P3) of the RI-anchoring disruptor (RIAD), which prevents PKA interaction with A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs). It is known that RIAD peptide abrogates effects of localized cAMP signalling through anchored type I PKA in lymphocytes and prevents murine AIDS (MAIDS) infection when expressed as a transgene in mice. Methods and Results In vitro HIV-infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) show reduced levels of p24 and intracellular cAMP in T cells when treated with RIAD peptidomimetic (RIAD-P3). Humanized NOD/SCID/IL2cnull (NSG) mice infected with HIV-1 JRCSF and treated with RIAD-P3 (3􏰀5 mg) once every 2 weeks showed significantly reduced levels of viral load at +28, +42 and +56 days and increased CD4 numbers at +56 days after the start of treatment. RIAD-P3-treated humanized mice had lower levels of intracellular cAMP in T cells sorted from splenocytes. Conclusions Treatment with RIAD-P3 limits HIV-1 viral replication and stabilizes CD4 levels by mechanisms involving cAMP/PKA-I pathway in human PBMCs and humanized NSG mice. [less ▲]

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See detailModelled target attainment after meropenem infusion in patients with severe nosocomial pneumonia: the PROMESSE study.
Frippiat, Frederic; Musuamba, Flora Tshinanu; Seidel, Laurence ULg et al

in The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy (2014)

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to propose an optimal treatment regimen of meropenem in critically ill patients with severe nosocomial pneumonia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Among 55 patients in ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to propose an optimal treatment regimen of meropenem in critically ill patients with severe nosocomial pneumonia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Among 55 patients in intensive care treated with 1 g of meropenem every 8 h for severe nosocomial pneumonia, 30 were assigned to intermittent infusion (II; over 0.5 h) and 25 to extended infusion (EI; over 3 h) groups. Based on plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) concentrations determined at steady-state, pharmacokinetic modelling and Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken to assess the probability of attaining drug concentrations above the MIC for 40%-100% of the time between doses (%T > 1-fold and 4-fold MIC), for 1 or 2 g administered by either method. RESULTS: Penetration ratio, measured by the ELF/plasma ratio of AUCs, was statistically higher in the EI group than in the II group (mean +/- SEM: 0.29 +/- 0.030 versus 0.20 +/- 0.033, P = 0.047). Considering a maximum susceptibility breakpoint of 2 mg/L, all dosages and modes of infusions achieved 40%-100% T > 1-fold MIC in plasma, but none did so in ELF, and only the 2 g dose over EI achieved 40%-100% T > 4-fold MIC in plasma. CONCLUSIONS: The optimum regimen to treat severe nosocomial pneumonia was 2 g of meropenem infused over 3 h every 8 h. This regimen achieved the highest pharmacodynamic targets both in plasma and in ELF. [less ▲]

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See detailMortierella wolfii-Associated Invasive Disease.
LAYIOS, Nathalie ULg; Canivet, Jean-Luc; Baron, Frédéric ULg et al

in Emerging infectious diseases (2014), 20(9), 1591-2

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See detailHorizontal gene transfer from human host to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase confers drug resistance and partly compensates for replication deficits.
Megens, Sarah; Vaira, Dolores; De Baets, Greet et al

in Virology (2014), 456-457

We investigated the origin and the effect of insertion D67D-THGERDLGPA within HIV-1 RT from a patient failing antiviral therapy. The insertion developed within the context of pre-existing NRTI and NNRTI ... [more ▼]

We investigated the origin and the effect of insertion D67D-THGERDLGPA within HIV-1 RT from a patient failing antiviral therapy. The insertion developed within the context of pre-existing NRTI and NNRTI mutations (M41L, L210W, T215Y and N348I). Concurrently, the NRTI mutations T69I and V118I and the NNRTI mutations K103N and Y181C were detected for the first time. High-level drug resistance (fold-changes>/=50) and a good replication capacity (87% of wild-type) were observed, significantly higher than for the previous virus without insertion. The insertion was very similar to a region within human chromosome 17 (31/34 nucleotide identity), and had already been detected independently in a Japanese HIV-1 isolate. These results suggest that a particular sequence within human chromosome 17 is prone to horizontal gene transfer into the HIV-1 RT finger subdomain. This insertion confers selective advantage to HIV-1 by its contribution to multi-drug resistance and restoration of impaired replication capacity. [less ▲]

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See detailPneumococcal vaccination: what have we learnt so far and what can we expect in the future?
Torres, A.; Bonanni, P.; Hryniewicz, W. et al

in European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology (2014)

Individuals <2 years and >/=50 years of age, as well as those with other specific risk factors, are especially vulnerable to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Conjugate vaccines have been developed ... [more ▼]

Individuals <2 years and >/=50 years of age, as well as those with other specific risk factors, are especially vulnerable to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Conjugate vaccines have been developed against encapsulated bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae to provide improved immune responses. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) has significantly reduced the burden of vaccine-type pneumococcal diseases in children, including invasive disease and pneumonia and acute otitis media. There have also been significant declines in antimicrobial resistance in 7-valent vaccine serotypes and carriage of S. pneumoniae in the post-PCV7 era. Two to three years after the introduction of PCV13, there is emerging, global evidence of a reduced burden of pneumococcal diseases in children, including declines in IPD (UK and Germany) and nasopharyngeal carriage of PCV13 serotypes (Portugal and France). The functional immunogenicity of PCV13 in individuals >/=50 years of age has been demonstrated in clinical trials in comparison with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and for children and adults 6 to 49 years of age. Between 2011 and 2013, PCV13 received market authorisation by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for these additional age groups and is now available in Europe for the prevention of pneumococcal disease in all age groups. [less ▲]

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See detailDUSP3/VHR is a pro-angiogenic atypical dual-specificity phosphatase
Amand, Mathieu ULg; Erpicum, Charlotte ULg; BAJOU, Khalid ULg et al

in Molecular Cancer (2014)

Background DUSP3 phosphatase, also known as Vaccinia-H1 Related (VHR) phosphatase, encoded by DUSP3/Dusp3 gene, is a relatively small member of the dual-specificity protein phosphatases. In vitro studies ... [more ▼]

Background DUSP3 phosphatase, also known as Vaccinia-H1 Related (VHR) phosphatase, encoded by DUSP3/Dusp3 gene, is a relatively small member of the dual-specificity protein phosphatases. In vitro studies showed that DUSP3 is a negative regulator of ERK and JNK pathways in several cell lines. On the other hand, DUSP3 is implicated in human cancer. It has been alternatively described as having tumor suppressive and oncogenic properties. Thus, the available data suggest that DUSP3 plays complex and contradictory roles in tumorigenesis that could be cell type-dependent. Since most of these studies were performed using recombinant proteins or in cell-transfection based assays, the physiological function of DUSP3 has remained elusive. Results Using immunohistochemistry on human cervical sections, we observed a strong expression of DUSP3 in endothelial cells (EC) suggesting a contribution for this phosphatase to EC functions. DUSP3 downregulation, using RNA interference, in human EC reduced significantly in vitro tube formation on Matrigel and spheroid angiogenic sprouting. However, this defect was not associated with an altered phosphorylation of the documented in vitro DUSP3 substrates, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and EGFR but was associated with an increased PKC phosphorylation. To investigate the physiological function of DUSP3, we generated Dusp3-deficient mice by homologous recombination. The obtained DUSP3-/- mice were healthy, fertile, with no spontaneous phenotype and no vascular defect. However, DUSP3 deficiency prevented neo-vascularization of transplanted b-FGF containing Matrigel and LLC xenograft tumors as evidenced by hemoglobin (Hb) and FITC-dextran quantifications. Furthermore, we found that DUSP3 is required for b-FGF-induced microvessel outgrowth in the aortic ring assay. Conclusions All together, our data identify DUSP3 as a new important player in angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailObesity phenotype is related to NLRP3 inflammasome activity and immunological profile of visceral adipose tissue
ESSER, Nathalie ULg; L'Homme, Laurent ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Diabetologia (2013), 56

Aims/hypothesis Obesity is a heterogeneous condition comprising both individuals who remain metabolically healthy (MHO) and those who develop metabolic disorders (metabolically unhealthy, MUO). Adipose ... [more ▼]

Aims/hypothesis Obesity is a heterogeneous condition comprising both individuals who remain metabolically healthy (MHO) and those who develop metabolic disorders (metabolically unhealthy, MUO). Adipose tissue is also heterogeneous in that its visceral component is more frequently associated with metabolic dysfunction than its subcutaneous component. The development of metabolic disorders is partly mediated by the NLR family pyrin domain containing-3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, which increases the secretion of inflammatory cytokines via activation of caspase-1. We compared the immunological profile and NLRP3 activity in adipose tissue between MUO and MHO individuals. Methods MHO and MUO phenotypes were defined, respectively, as the absence and the presence of the metabolic syndrome. Cellular composition and intrinsic inflammasome activity were investigated by flow cytometry, quantitative RTPCR and tissue culture studies in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue from 23 MUO, 21 MHO and nine lean individuals. Results We found significant differences between the three study groups, including an increased secretion of IL-1β, increased expression of IL1B and NLRP3, increased number of adipose tissue macrophages and decreased number of regulatory T cells in the visceral adipose tissue of MUO patients compared with MHO and lean participants. In macrophages derived from visceral adipose tissue, both caspase-1 activity and IL-1β levels were higher in MUO patients than in MHO patients. Furthermore, caspase-1 activity was higher in CD11c+CD206+ adipose tissue macrophages than in CD11c−CD206+ cells. Conclusions/interpretation The MUO phenotype seems to be associated with an increased activation of the NLPR3 inflammasome in macrophages infiltrating visceral adipose tissue, and a less favourable inflammatory profile compared with the MHO phenotype. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst report of Mortierella wolfii causing human disease
LAYIOS, Nathalie ULg; HAYETTE, Marie-Pierre ULg; HUWART, Aline ULg et al

Conference (2013, September)

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See detailUse of Dried Blood Spot to Improve the Diagnosis and Management of HIV in Resource-Limited Settings
Adawaye, Chatté Idekhim ULg; Erick, Kamangou; Ali, Mahamat Moussa et al

in World Journal of AIDS (2013), 3

Over 75% of people infected with HIV live in countries where health resources are very limited for the diagnosis and biological monitoring of people infected by the virus. In resource-limited settings ... [more ▼]

Over 75% of people infected with HIV live in countries where health resources are very limited for the diagnosis and biological monitoring of people infected by the virus. In resource-limited settings, the use of DBS is a valuable alterna- tive. It has provided technical and economical alternative to the collection of blood in the tubes for testing HIV infec- tion. The DBS can be kept for over a year, it is economical in storage space and facilitates storage conditions because it can be stored at room temperature. It is more discreet and easier to carry over liquid samples that require tubes and other appropriate materials. The amount is sufficient for certain analyses of DNA generally, but may be insufficient for the analysis of viral RNA if the viral load is low. Its disadvantage is often associated with small amounts of blood col- lected available for testing, and the difficulties encountered in laboratories to extract the maximum possibilities without material contamination. DBS can be stored at room temperature (25°C - 35°C), at 4°C, −20°C or even −70°C. With PCR, the DBS is a suitable medium for the diagnosis of patients infected with HIV, virological monitoring by the VL and even analyzing viral genotype. It is a handy stand for the collection, transport and analyses of biological monitoring of HIV infection. It is indeed very suitable for environments with limited accessibility where it is difficult for specialized laboratories to monitor these patients. The DBS is suitable for resource-limited settings. [less ▲]

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See detailDifférences d’activité de l’inflammasome NLRP3 entre sujets obèses avec et sans anomalies métaboliques
Esser, Nathalie ULg; L'Homme, Laurent ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2013, March), 39(suppl 1), 102

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See detailRôle de la vitamine D dans l'infection par le VIH: revue des connaissances actuelles
Pirotte, Benoît ULg; Rassenfosse, Marie ULg; Collin, Romain ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2013), 68(1), 25-31

La vitamine D possède des propriétés sur le métabolisme phosphocalcique mais aussi dans diverses pathologies telles que les maladies auto-immunes, les cancers, les maladies cardio-vasculaires, l’excès de ... [more ▼]

La vitamine D possède des propriétés sur le métabolisme phosphocalcique mais aussi dans diverses pathologies telles que les maladies auto-immunes, les cancers, les maladies cardio-vasculaires, l’excès de poids ou encore certaines infections. Nous nous intéressons ici aux relations frappantes qui existent entre la vitamine D et le VIH. Cette hormone joue assurément un rôle important dans l’infection par le VIH, tant au niveau squelettique qu’au niveau de l’évolution de la maladie elle-même. Nous remarquons en effet qu’un déficit en vitamine D est très souvent associé à l’infection par le VIH. De plus, un taux indétectable de cette hormone chez les patients séropositifs est associé à une infection cliniquement plus avancée et à une mortalité accrue. Ainsi, le déficit en vitamine D doit être considéré comme un cofacteur important de la progression de l’infection par le VIH. En effet, la vitamine D augmente l’activité des macrophages, entre autres via le processus d’autophagie, ce qui permet d’inhiber l’infection par le VIH-1. Nous parlerons ensuite de l’impact de certains traitements antirétroviraux sur l’altération du métabolisme de la vitamine D. Nous évaluerons enfin le bénéfice d’une supplémentation en vitamine D chez ces patients. [less ▲]

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See detailPerceptions de la pratique des essais cliniques sur le VIH/sida par les médecins prescripteurs des antirétroviraux agréés de Kinshasa (RD Congo)
Lubangi, MM; MOUTSCHEN, Michel ULg

in Bulletin de la Société de Pathologie Exotique (2012)

Le but de cette étude, réalisée entre novembre 2005 et janvier 2006 auprès des prescripteurs d’antirétroviraux (ARV), était de cerner leurs perceptions sur les enjeux contextuels liés à la pratique des ... [more ▼]

Le but de cette étude, réalisée entre novembre 2005 et janvier 2006 auprès des prescripteurs d’antirétroviraux (ARV), était de cerner leurs perceptions sur les enjeux contextuels liés à la pratique des essais sur le VIH/sida à Kinshasa. Pour effectuer le repérage de ces enjeux, un ques- tionnaire a été élaboré et finalisé à la suite de la phase explo- ratoire de notre enquête afin d’apprécier les points de vue des médecins agréés par le Programme national de lutte contre le sida du Congo (PNLS) et qui jouent le premier rôle dans le contexte de leur pratique professionnelle. Sur 50 médecins sollicités pour participer à notre enquête, 35 ont retourné le questionnaire, dix n’étaient pas disponibles au moment de l’enquête et cinq n’ont pas retourné le questionnaire à l’adresse et dans le délai que nous avions indiqués. Les résul- tats obtenus témoignent de la nécessité de renforcer les capa- cités des acteurs locaux. Un des objectifs visés par la conduite locale de ces essais étant le transfert des connais- sances, il est nécessaire, au vu des résultats, d’affirmer le rôle pédagogique du comité d’éthique local. Cela devra permettre de relever le défi de la contextualisation et de réduire les tensions susceptibles de compromettre le bon déroulement des essais cliniques. [less ▲]

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See detailHYGIENE ET PROBLEMES INFECTIEUX EN GERIATRIE
Moutschen, Michel ULg; FRIPPIAT, Frédéric ULg; CHRISTIAENS, Geneviève ULg et al

Conference (2012, June 14)

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See detailAn improved protocol for efficient engraftment in NOD/LTSZ-SCIDIL-2Rgammanull mice allows HIV replication and development of anti-HIV immune responses.
Singh, Maneesh; Singh, Pratibha; Gaudray, Gilles et al

in PloS one (2012), 7(6), 38491

Cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) transplanted immunodeficient NOD/LtsZ-scidIL2Rgamma(null) (NSG) and NOD/SCID/IL2Rgamma(null) (NOG) mice need efficient human cell engraftment for long ... [more ▼]

Cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) transplanted immunodeficient NOD/LtsZ-scidIL2Rgamma(null) (NSG) and NOD/SCID/IL2Rgamma(null) (NOG) mice need efficient human cell engraftment for long-term HIV-1 replication studies. Total body irradiation (TBI) is a classical myeloablation regimen used to improve engraftment levels of human cells in these humanized mice. Some recent reports suggest the use of busulfan as a myeloablation regimen to transplant HPCs in neonatal and adult NSG mice. In the present study, we further ameliorated the busulfan myeloablation regimen with fresh CB-CD34+cell transplantation in 3-4 week old NSG mice. In this CB-CD34+transplanted NSG mice engraftment efficiency of human CD45+cell is over 90% in peripheral blood. Optimal engraftment promoted early and increased CD3+T cell levels, with better lymphoid tissue development and prolonged human cell chimerism over 300 days. These humanized NSG mice have shown long-lasting viremia after HIV-1JRCSF and HIV-1Bal inoculation through intravenous and rectal routes. We also saw a gradual decline of the CD4+T cell count, widespread immune activation, up-regulation of inflammation marker and microbial translocation after HIV-1 infection. Humanized NSG mice reconstituted according to our new protocol produced, moderate cellular and humoral immune responses to HIV-1 postinfection. We believe that NSG mice reconstituted according to our easy to use protocol will provide a better in vivo model for HIV-1 replication and anti-HIV-1 therapy trials. [less ▲]

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See detailTreatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients.
Theys, Kristof; Deforche, Koen; Vercauteren, Jurgen et al

in Retrovirology (2012), 9

BACKGROUND: The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory mutations, often already polymorphic in wild-type viruses, do not tend to revert after transmission. While compensatory mutations increase fitness during treatment, their presence may also modulate viral fitness and virulence in absence of therapy and major resistance mutations. We previously designed a modeling technique that quantifies genotypic footprints of in vivo treatment selective pressure, including both drug resistance mutations and polymorphic compensatory mutations, through the quantitative description of a fitness landscape from virus genetic sequences. RESULTS: Genotypic correlates of viral load and CD4 cell count were evaluated in subtype B sequences from recently diagnosed treatment-naive patients enrolled in the SPREAD programme. The association of surveillance drug resistance mutations, reported compensatory mutations and fitness estimated from drug selective pressure fitness landscapes with baseline viral load and CD4 cell count was evaluated using regression techniques. Protease genotypic variability estimated to increase fitness during treatment was associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 cell counts also in treatment-naive patients, which could primarily be attributed to well-known compensatory mutations at highly polymorphic positions. By contrast, treatment-related mutations in reverse transcriptase could not explain viral load or CD4 cell count variability. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that polymorphic compensatory mutations in protease, reported to be selected during treatment, may improve the replicative capacity of HIV-1 even in absence of drug selective pressure or major resistance mutations. The presence of this polymorphic variation may either reflect a history of drug selective pressure, i.e. transmission from a treated patient, or merely be a result of diversity in wild-type virus. Our findings suggest that transmitted drug resistance has the potential to contribute to faster disease progression in the newly infected host and to shape the HIV-1 epidemic at a population level. [less ▲]

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