References of "Monty, Arnaud"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNo copper required for germination of an endangered endemic species from the Katangan Copperbelt (Katanga, DR Congo): Diplolophium marthozianum
Boisson, Sylvain ULg; Ortmans, William ULg; Maréchal, Justine et al

in Tropical Ecology (2017), 58(1), 193-198

Two hypotheses were tested with respect to the germination of Diplolophium marthozianum, an endemic plant species of the copper-cobalt outcrops in Katanga, Democratic Republic of Congo: (1) germination of ... [more ▼]

Two hypotheses were tested with respect to the germination of Diplolophium marthozianum, an endemic plant species of the copper-cobalt outcrops in Katanga, Democratic Republic of Congo: (1) germination of copper-endemics is limited by fungal infection in the absence of pathogen control and (2) the germination success of this copper-endemic species is copper-dependent. Seed lots of twenty seeds were weighed, soaked in different disinfection treatments and then placed in a germination medium containing four distinct copper concentrations for 30 days. Seed viability was measured at the beginning and at the end of the experiment by a cut test. Final germination percentage (15.2 ± 8.2 %) and seed viability (24.2 ± 10.3 %) were not affected by copper concentration or disinfection treatments. D. marthozianum is able to germinate in a substrate without added copper, despite pervasive fungal infection. However, seed mass had a significant positive effect on seed germination suggesting that selecting the largest seeds may ensure the highest germination success in ex situ conservation programs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDo flower mixtures with high functional diversity enhance aphid predators in wildflower strips?
Hatt, Séverin ULg; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg; Chevalier Mendes Lopes, Thomas ULg et al

in European Journal of Entomology (2017), 114

Among semi-natural elements in agricultural landscapes, wildflower strips sown at field margins or within fields represent potential habitats for the natural enemies of insect pests. As insects are ... [more ▼]

Among semi-natural elements in agricultural landscapes, wildflower strips sown at field margins or within fields represent potential habitats for the natural enemies of insect pests. As insects are sensitive to a variety of flower traits, we hypothesised that mixtures with high functional diversity attract and support a higher abundance and species richness of aphid flower visiting predators compared to mixtures with low functional diversity. During a field experiment, repeated over two years (2014 and 2015) in Gembloux (Belgium), aphid predators (i.e., lacewings, ladybeetles and hoverflies) were pan-trapped in five sown flower mixtures (including a control mixture, with three replicates of each mixture) of low to high functional diversity based on seven traits (i.e., flower colour, ultra-violet reflectance and pattern, blooming start and duration, height and flower class, primarily based on corolla morphology). In both years, flower species in the sown mixtures (i.e., sown and spontaneous flowers) were listed, and the realised functional diversity of each plot was calculated. Over the two years, an increase in functional diversity did not result in an increase in the abundance and richness of aphid predators. Moreover, ladybeetles, representing the majority of trapped predators, were more abundant in mixtures with very low or intermediary functional diversity at sowing, especially in 2014. We hypothesise that certain flower species, which were abundant in certain mixtures (and not in those exhibiting the highest functional diversity), attracted predators and were sufficiently represented to support them. Our results present novel information that could be used to the development of flower mixtures that provide effective ecosystem services, such as pest control. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (6 ULg)
See detailPlant functional trait diversity in wildflower strips: the key to promote pollinators in agricultural landscapes?
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg; Piqueray, Julien; Monty, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2016, October 27)

Creating wildflower strips is often suggested as a tool to support pollinator diversity in agricultural landscapes and to promote crop pollination service. The choice of the plant species to sow in flower ... [more ▼]

Creating wildflower strips is often suggested as a tool to support pollinator diversity in agricultural landscapes and to promote crop pollination service. The choice of the plant species to sow in flower strips can influence the effectivity of the strips in supporting pollinators. While it has already been shown that increasing plant species diversity is beneficial for ecosystem services, it is often suggested that plant functional traits and functional trait diversity are the key for this relationship. We created a replicated field experiment with different levels of plant functional diversity in wildflower strips in Belgium to test the effect on the flower-visiting pollinator community. We sampled plant-pollinator interaction networks during 2 years and assessed how the plant functional diversity affected the network structure. Plant functional diversity did not have a clear effect on visiting pollinator species richness, however a different interaction pattern was observed with different functional diversity level. Pollinators in wildflower strips with higher functional diversity had less overlap in their ecological niche, while network stability and robustness for secondary extinctions were not affected. We discuss implications for wildflower strip design. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEffects of seed traits variation on seedling performance of the invasive weed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia
Monty, Arnaud ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg; Ortmans, William ULg

Poster (2016, September 14)

Seedling performance can determine the survival of a juvenile plant and impact adult plant performance. Understanding the factors that may impact seedling performance is thus critical, especially for ... [more ▼]

Seedling performance can determine the survival of a juvenile plant and impact adult plant performance. Understanding the factors that may impact seedling performance is thus critical, especially for annuals, opportunists or invasive plant species. Seedling performance can vary among mothers or populations in response to environmental conditions or under the influence of seed traits. However, very few studies have investigated seed traits variations and their consequences on seedling performance. Specifically, the following questions have been addressed by this work: 1) How the seed traits of the invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. vary among mothers and populations, as well as along the latitude; 2) How do seed traits influence seedling performance; 3) Is the influence on seedlings temperature dependent. With seeds from nine Western Europe ruderal populations, seed traits that can influence seedling development were measured. The seeds were sown into growth chambers with warmer or colder temperature treatments. During seedling growth, performance-related traits were measured. A high variability in seed traits was highlighted. Variation was determined by the mother identity and population, but not latitude. Together, the temperature, population and the identity of the mother had an effect on seedling performance. Seed traits had a relative impact on seedling performance, but this did not appear to be temperature dependent. Seedling performance exhibited a strong plastic response to the temperature, was shaped by the identity of the mother and the population, and was influenced by a number of seed traits. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (24 ULg)
Full Text
See detailFirst come first served: “priority effect“ benefits Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. more than other ruderal Asteraceae species
Ortmans, William ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg; Monty, Arnaud ULg

Poster (2016, September 14)

Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (common ragweed, Asteraceae) is an invasive weed causing a health crisis in Europe, due to its highly allergenic pollen. In Western Europe the invaded range covers most of ... [more ▼]

Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (common ragweed, Asteraceae) is an invasive weed causing a health crisis in Europe, due to its highly allergenic pollen. In Western Europe the invaded range covers most of central and southern France, and northern Italy. Northwards beyond the edge of this range, occurrence of casual population have been described for years, but these populations do not appear to become invasive, and the species does not seem to spread. This situation raises the following question: Has the invaded range reached a limit or will the species continue its invasion northwards? To answer this question, we followed two complementary approaches. First we set up an experimental garden in Belgium, 250 km north to the current invaded range, to see if the local climate allows the completion of the species reproduction cycle. Second, we performed an in situ measurement campaign in 12 population located beyond the edge, within the range but near the margin, and in the center of the invaded range. The aim of this campaign was to test whether the species had reduced plant performance towards range margins. The results showed that the species is able to establish populations with high growth rates in Belgium. Furthermore, the species expressed similar performance across the considered areas, even beyond the current invasion front. No evidence of processes constraining the invasion was found, which suggests a great potential for invasion north to the current invaded range. In this uncertain situation, awareness actions should be considered in the northern countries. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 364 (216 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIs Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. able to expand its invaded range northward in Western Europe?
Ortmans, William ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg; Monty, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2016, September 13)

Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (common ragweed, Asteraceae) is an invasive weed causing a health crisis in Europe, due to its highly allergenic pollen. In Western Europe the invaded range covers most of ... [more ▼]

Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (common ragweed, Asteraceae) is an invasive weed causing a health crisis in Europe, due to its highly allergenic pollen. In Western Europe the invaded range covers most of central and southern France, and northern Italy. Northwards beyond the edge of this range, occurrence of casual population have been described for years, but these populations do not appear to become invasive, and the species does not seem to spread. This situation raises the following question: Has the invaded range reached a limit or will the species continue its invasion northwards? To answer this question, we followed two complementary approaches. First we set up an experimental garden in Belgium, 250 km north to the current invaded range, to see if the local climate allows the completion of the species reproduction cycle. Second, we performed an in situ measurement campaign in 12 population located beyond the edge, within the range but near the margin, and in the center of the invaded range. The aim of this campaign was to test whether the species had reduced plant performance towards range margins. The results showed that the species is able to establish populations with high growth rates in Belgium. Furthermore, the species expressed similar performance across the considered areas, even beyond the current invasion front. No evidence of processes constraining the invasion was found, which suggests a great potential for invasion north to the current invaded range. In this uncertain situation, awareness actions should be considered in the northern countries. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (12 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailOccurrence rates of invasive plants in limestone quarries (Southern Belgium)
Pitz, Carline ULg; Jorion, Alexis ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg et al

Conference (2016, August 23)

In quarries, invasive plant species can slow down the installation of high conservation value vegetation. Successful management of invasive requires, at first, a quantitative assessment of invasion levels ... [more ▼]

In quarries, invasive plant species can slow down the installation of high conservation value vegetation. Successful management of invasive requires, at first, a quantitative assessment of invasion levels. Although European legislation has adopted an ambitious strategy against invasive species, there is still a lack of knowledge about their occurrence in quarries. The aim of this study was to evaluate occurrence rates of invasive plant species in limestone quarries throughout Wallonia (Southern Belgium) and identify high priority and emerging invasive plants for adapted management. During 2016 vegetation period, forty quarries were selected by stratified sampling, using abandoned and active quarries as strata. Within selected quarries, two-meter wide transects were established to cross all activity sectors. Transects were divided in 10x2m plots, resulting in 2% of total surface of each quarry being surveyed. Cover and number of individuals of invasive plants species were recorded in each plot. Species considered were those of Harmonia list (67 species), the reference at the Wallonia scale. More than 30 000 plots were surveyed. Results of our recent study are presented (occurrences rates by species, mean percentage cover per site). First results indicate that dominant invasive species originate from different introduction paths: (i) planted (Robinia pseudoacacia); (ii) ornamentals (Cotoneaster horizontalis) and (iii) spontaneous colonization (Senecio inaequidens) - and follow various invasion dynamics. We propose research and management methods to be directed towards limitation of top ten frequent species (e.g. Buddleia davidii, Senecio inaequidens), and to establish a detection system for the emerging invasive plants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (16 ULg)
Full Text
See detailA population approach to evaluate grassland restoration - a systematic review
Harzé, Mélanie ULg; Monty, Arnaud ULg; Boisson, Sylvain ULg et al

Conference (2016, August)

How do we know if restoration goals are achieved? In practice, the criteria used to evaluate the success of restoration actions are numerous and can be defined at different ecological scales, i.e. at the ... [more ▼]

How do we know if restoration goals are achieved? In practice, the criteria used to evaluate the success of restoration actions are numerous and can be defined at different ecological scales, i.e. at the population, community or ecosystem level. Most studies about restoration success monitoring assessed attributes corresponding to the community or ecosystem levels like species diversity, vegetation structure and ecological processes. Has the population approach been disregarded to evaluate restoration success? This systematic review of the literature aimed to identify how often plant population traits were used to monitor restoration of grasslands. Practically, 3133 papers were reviewed among which 1065 reported monitoring of plant species after a restoration action. Only 153 papers used a population approach and represent the core of this review. Detailed results and paper content will be presented with the aim to identify restoration protocols (with or without species addition), species of interest, population attributes and processes considered to evaluate restoration success. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDiaspore heteromorphism in the invasive Bromus tectorum L. (Poaceae): sterile fl orets increase dispersal propensity and distance
Monty, Arnaud ULg; Maebe, Laura ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg et al

in Flora (2016)

Within a species, the distance travelled by a particular diaspore depends on its morphology. In Poaceae, the presence of terminal sterile florets can lead to diaspore heteromorphism, which may influence ... [more ▼]

Within a species, the distance travelled by a particular diaspore depends on its morphology. In Poaceae, the presence of terminal sterile florets can lead to diaspore heteromorphism, which may influence dispersal. We tested the hypothesis that the presence of sterile florets favored dispersal in Bromus tectorum L., an invasive grass in the Western US. We used field and controlled experiments to study the dispersal of caryopses with and without sterile florets attached (respectively complex and simple diaspores), as well as pieces of inflorescence that detached from the mother plants. We considered both primary and secondary dispersal, as well as abiotic and biotic dispersal agents. The distance travelled by the diaspores and their attachment to animal fur were related to the presence and number of sterile florets. Abiotic agents moved diaspores over relatively short distances, both in terms of primary and secondary dispersal. A significant proportion of diaspores attached to fur, suggesting a potential for dispersal over longdistances. Complex diaspores were better dispersers than simple ones (and pieces of inflorescence), and this pattern was consistent across the study. However, among complex diaspores, the number of sterile florets had little or no influence. Considering primary and secondary dispersal by abiotic and biotic agents provided a general picture of the dispersal ecology of B. tectorum. For all the dispersal steps and dispersal agents we studied, the presence of sterile florets favored dispersal. These results highlight the functional significance of diaspore heteromorphism induced by floret sterility in the dispersal of Poaceae. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNo evidence for genetic differentiation between French and Belgian populations of the exotic tree Robinia pseudoacacia
Bouteiller, Xavier; Aikio, E; Raimbault, A et al

Poster (2016, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailStructuration of Robinia pseudoacacia L. genetic diversity in the American natural range and derived Belgian populations
Verdu, Cindy; Daïnou, Kasso; De Thier, Olivier et al

Poster (2016, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMonitoring the occurrence of invasive plants in different types of natural habitats
Monty, Arnaud ULg; Frisson, Gwenn; Delbart, Emmanuel et al

Conference (2016, April 19)

Protected areas and the Natura 2000 network are keystones of the EU nature and biodiversity policy. However, alien plants do not stop their spread at the border of protected areas and invasive plants are ... [more ▼]

Protected areas and the Natura 2000 network are keystones of the EU nature and biodiversity policy. However, alien plants do not stop their spread at the border of protected areas and invasive plants are reported to threaten many ecosystems, from aquatic and riparian areas to dry and xeric sites. The presentation summarizes three large-scale quantitative assessments of the occurrence of exotic plants in Wallonia, i.e. the southern part of Belgium. Three types of natural habitats were the focus of the assessments: i) ponds and lakes (400 sites); ii) river banks (187 sites); and iii) xeric ecosystems such dry grasslands, rocky habitats and screes (86 sites). In the three studies, sites were selected through a stratified sampling then visited. Exotic plants were recorded and their abundance assessed. Additional information about population dynamics, environmental conditions and visible impacts was recorded. Elodea spp. were the most common species in water bodies, with occurrence rates reaching 2.7%. Other aquatic alien species were found, but with an occurrence rate below 1%. Along rivers, 51 alien species were observed. Some were widespread (e.g. Impatiens glandulifera, with 17 % of linear banks invaded) whereas others were either rare or considered emergent alien species. Analyses showed that typical riparian species’ occurrence increased with the size of the watershed, indicating propagule pressure within protected areas through hydrochory. In xeric sites, the most common species were either cultivated or ornamental ones such as Juglans regia, Cotoneaster horizontalis, Prunus serotina, Robinia pseudoacacia and Buddleja davidii. The former was found in 15.1% of the visited sites. The implications of the different results, notably about emergent species, are related to the need for an effective early detection system. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIs Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. able to expand its invaded range northward in Western Europe?
Ortmans, William ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg; Monty, Arnaud ULg

Poster (2016, April 19)

Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (common ragweed, Asteraceae) is an invasive weed causing a health crisis in Europe, due to its highly allergenic pollen. In Western Europe the invaded range covers most of ... [more ▼]

Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (common ragweed, Asteraceae) is an invasive weed causing a health crisis in Europe, due to its highly allergenic pollen. In Western Europe the invaded range covers most of central and southern France, and northern Italy. Northwards beyond the edge of this range, occurrence of casual population have been described for years, but these populations do not appear to become invasive, and the species does not seem to spread. This situation raises the following question: Has the invaded range reached a limit or will the species continue its invasion northwards? To answer this question, we followed two complementary approaches. First we set up an experimental garden in Belgium, 250 km north to the current invaded range, to see if the local climate allows the completion of the species reproduction cycle. Second, we performed an in situ measurement campaign in 12 population located beyond the edge, within the range but near the margin, and in the center of the invaded range. The aim of this campaign was to test whether the species had reduced plant performance towards range margins. The results showed that the species is able to establish populations with high growth rates in Belgium. Furthermore, the species expressed similar performance across the considered areas, even beyond the current invasion front. No evidence of processes constraining the invasion was found, which suggests a great potential for invasion north to the current invaded range. In this uncertain situation, awareness actions should be considered in the northern countries. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (10 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSNP development from RADseq data for the non-model species Robinia pseudoacacia L.
Verdu, Cindy; Guichoux, Erwan; Quevauvillers, Samuel et al

Poster (2016, April 04)

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPerformance variation of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) across invasion levels in Western Europe
Ortmans, William ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg; Chauvel, Bruno et al

in Flora (2016), 220

The occurrence of an invasive plant across a continent is generally not homogeneous; typically, some areas are highly invaded whereas others show moderate or low invasion levels. This situation might be a ... [more ▼]

The occurrence of an invasive plant across a continent is generally not homogeneous; typically, some areas are highly invaded whereas others show moderate or low invasion levels. This situation might be a snapshot of an ongoing spread, but it could also remain stable under the pressure of factors that constrain the invasion. Among those factors, plant performance variation among invasion levels can explain an invasion slowdown. However, few studies have investigated the large-scale variation of invasive plant performance in the field. Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. in Western Europe represents a good opportunity to address this issue, with areas of high, moderate and low invasion levels being documented across a ca. 1000 km transect. In this study, we compared in situ plant performance-related traits in 12 populations from areas of contrasting invasion levels. We also tested whether performance-related traits were influenced by the intra-and inter-specific competition, by the local climatic conditions or by latitude (a proxy for growing season length). Overall, we did not find differences in performance-related traits across invasion levels, and intra-and inter-specific competition had low effects on plant performance. This study highlights the fact that A. artemisiifolia individuals express similar performance across invasion levels, even beyond what can be considered the present invasion front. Further research has to expand this study northwards, and assess other factors that could constrain the invasion in order to highlight if the species invasion northward is constrained or if it has the potential to invade new areas. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (18 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of seed traits variation on seedling performance of the invasive weed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.
Ortmans, William ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg; Monty, Arnaud ULg

in Acta Oecologica: International Journal of Ecology (2016), 71

Seedling performance can determine the survival of a juvenile plant and impact adult plant performance. Understanding the factors that may impact seedling performance is thus critical, especially for ... [more ▼]

Seedling performance can determine the survival of a juvenile plant and impact adult plant performance. Understanding the factors that may impact seedling performance is thus critical, especially for annuals, opportunists or invasive plant species. Seedling performance can vary among mothers or populations in response to environmental conditions or under the influence of seed traits. However, very few studies have investigated seed traits variations and their consequences on seedling performance. Specifically, the following questions have been addressed by this work: 1) How the seed traits of the invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. vary among mothers and populations, as well as along the latitude; 2) How do seed traits influence seedling performance; 3) Is the influence on seedlings temperature dependent. With seeds from nine Western Europe ruderal populations, seed traits that can influence seedling development were measured. The seeds were sown into growth chambers with warmer or colder temperature treatments. During seedling growth, performance-related traits were measured. A high variability in seed traits was highlighted. Variation was determined by the mother identity and population, but not latitude. Together, the temperature, population and the identity of the mother had an effect on seedling performance. Seed traits had a relative impact on seedling performance, but this did not appear to be temperature dependent. Seedling performance exhibited a strong plastic response to the temperature, was shaped by the identity of the mother and the population, and was influenced by a number of seed traits. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (34 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGrasshoppers as a food source? A review
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016), 20(AgricultureIsLife), 337-352

Description of the subject. Current trends suggest an increasing future demand for conventional meats, which indicates a strong need to shift this dependency to other alternative protein sources such as ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. Current trends suggest an increasing future demand for conventional meats, which indicates a strong need to shift this dependency to other alternative protein sources such as insects. Literature. From a nutritional point of view, of all the insects consumed globally, grasshoppers are particularly important as a human food. Data from the literature regarding the nutrient composition, amino acid profile, fatty acid profile, mineral composition and vitamin content of grasshoppers as reviewed in this paper, suggest that a number of grasshopper species are a good source of nutrients. It also highlights some of the health related aspects that might arise from the consumption of grasshoppers, mostly linked to agricultural practices and the allergic response of sensitive individuals. The paper also summarizes some religious, social and economic factors that are associated with grasshopper consumption. Conclusions. The success of introducing grasshoppers as a novel food in western countries depends on changes in consumer attitudes. It would be interesting to develop food products derived from grasshoppers in a form acceptable to consumers. Furthermore, it is important to explore the food potential of some grasshopper species native to western countries and to develop their rearing methodologies to enhance availability. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (27 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTowards sustainable food systems: the concept of agroecology and how it questions current research practices. A review
Hatt, Séverin ULg; Artru, Sidonie ULg; Brédart, David ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016), 20(Special issue 1), 215-224

Introduction. Multiple environmental and socio-economic indicators show that our current agriculture and the organization of the food system need to be revised. Agroecology has been proposed as a ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Multiple environmental and socio-economic indicators show that our current agriculture and the organization of the food system need to be revised. Agroecology has been proposed as a promising concept for achieving greater sustainability. This paper offers an overview and discussion of the concept based on existing literature and case studies, and explores the way it questions our current research approaches and education paradigms. Literature. In order to improve the sustainability of agriculture, the use of external and chemical inputs needs to be minimized. Agroecological farming practices seek to optimize ecological processes, thus minimizing the need for external inputs by providing an array of ecosystem services. Implementing such practices challenges the current structure of the food system, which has been criticized for its lack of social relevance and economic viability. An agroecological approach includes all stakeholders, from field to fork, in the discussion, design and development of future food systems. This inclusion of various disciplines and stakeholders raises issues about scientists and their research practices, as well as about the education of the next generation of scientists. Conclusions. Agroecology is based on the concept that agricultural practices and food systems cannot be dissociated because they belong to the same natural and socio-economic context. Clearly, agroecology is not a silver-bullet, but its principles can serve as avenues for rethinking the current approaches towards achieving greater sustainability. Adapting research approaches in line with indicators that promote inter- and transdisciplinary research is essential if progress is to be made. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 129 (30 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPros and cons of flowers strips for farmers. A review
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg; Hatt, Séverin ULg; Paul, Aman ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016), 20(s1), 225-235

Description of the subject. To counteract environmental problems due to agricultural intensification, European farmers can apply agri-environmental schemes in their fields. Flower strips are one example ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. To counteract environmental problems due to agricultural intensification, European farmers can apply agri-environmental schemes in their fields. Flower strips are one example of these schemes, with the aim of supporting biodiversity, leading to an increase in “useful” species groups such as pollinators for crop pollination and natural enemies for pest control. However, to our knowledge, a complete appraisal of the pros and cons of flower strips, from a farmer’s point of view, does not yet exist. It is proposed that better and more complete information could increase the adoption and implementation of such agri-environmental schemes. Objectives. This study aims 1) to assess the pros and cons of flower strips, from a farmer’s point of view, and 2) to highlight the knowledge gaps that exist in the scientific literature, for the different types of pros and cons. Method. We listed the different components of the appraisal of pros and cons and conducted a systematic screening of the scientific literature on flower strips and these components. Results. The largest part of the 31 selected studies was concerning agronomical and ecological processes, such as pollination and animal pest control. Most of them indicated positive effects of flower strips. For many components of the appraisal, mostly economic and social ones, few or no studies were found. Conclusions. While a positive balance of pros and cons, from a farmer’s point of view, came from our literature screening, large research gaps still remain and more research is required, especially in the economic and social components of the evaluation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (20 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAgricultureIsLife or how to facilitate innovation in agriculture through multi-disciplinary research
Monty, Arnaud ULg; Garré, Sarah ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (5 ULg)