References of "Lahmouzi, Jamila"
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See detailInfluence of sodium hypochlorite on Er:YAG Laser-irradiated dentin and its effect on the quality of adaptation of the composite restoration margins
LAHMOUZI, Jamila ULg; Farache, M.; Umana, M. et al

in Photomedicine and Laser Surgery (2012), 30(11), 655-662

Objective: The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate: (1) the influence of 5% NaOCl application on Er:YAG-irradiated dentin; and (2) its effect on the quality of adaptation of the composite ... [more ▼]

Objective: The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate: (1) the influence of 5% NaOCl application on Er:YAG-irradiated dentin; and (2) its effect on the quality of adaptation of the composite restoration margins. Background data: Previous research has shown that Er:YAG dentin irradiation produces a thermally affected tissue layer that results in lower bond strength than that of nonirradiated dentin. The removal of this thermally-affected layer may enhance the quality of dentin bonding Materials and methods: Forty-nine caries-free extracted human molars were transversely sectioned in order to totally expose the dentin. Four standardized cavities were created on the dentinal surface of each molar. First, two cavities were irradiated with Er:YAG laser (2.94 nm): 150 mJ, 10 Hz, variable square pulse (VSP) mode (100 μsec), beam diameter=0.9 mm, speed of irradiation=1 mm/sec, 20% air and 20% water. Then, one of irradiated cavities and one of nonirradiated cavities were treated for 30 sec with 5% NaOCl solution. Finally, they went through a standard bonding treatment for composite restoration, etching, bonding, and composite filling. We obtained four groups of cavities: (1) one control group of nonirradiated cavities not pretreated with NaOCl; (2) one group of nonirradiated cavities, pretreated with NaOCl; (3) one group of irradiated cavities, not pretreated with NaOCl; and (4) one group of irradiated cavities, pretreated with NaOCl. All samples were subjected to thermocycling. Every cavity was immersed into a 0.5% solution of methylene blue. The percentage of dye penetration (microleakage) in the composite-dentin interface was evaluated. Six molars were analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Results: Dye infiltration depth was significantly reduced in irradiated cavities treated with 5% NaOCl solution. Conclusions: The application of a 5% NaOCl solution on Er:YAG irradiated cavities can significantly improve the marginal quality of composite bonding. © Copyright 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2012. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of nicotine on rat gingival fibroblasts in vitro
Lahmouzi, Jamila ULg; Simain-Sato, Franklin ULg; Defresne, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Connective Tissue Research (2000), 41(1), 69-80

Nicotine from 3 to 5 mM affects growth and survival rate of rat gingival fibroblasts in vitro. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilated mitochondria and vacuolization in treated cells, suggestive of ... [more ▼]

Nicotine from 3 to 5 mM affects growth and survival rate of rat gingival fibroblasts in vitro. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilated mitochondria and vacuolization in treated cells, suggestive of necrosis, but increased apoptosis was also revealed by cytometry. On the basis of this in vitro study, it appear that tobacco, through its component nicotine, may directly affect various functions of rat gingival fibroblasts [less ▲]

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See detailCulture of Gingival Fibroblasts on Bioabsorbable Regenerative Materials in Vitro
Simain-Sato, Franklin ULg; Lahmouzi, Jamila ULg; Kalykakis, G. K. et al

in Journal of Periodontology (1999), 70(10), 1234-9

BACKGROUND: The use of membranes in guided tissue regeneration (GTR) can limit the apical migration of gingival cells and favor the establishment of new attachment by periodontal ligament fibroblasts ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The use of membranes in guided tissue regeneration (GTR) can limit the apical migration of gingival cells and favor the establishment of new attachment by periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However, gingival recession during healing following GTR has been described as a frequent complication. The purpose of this study was to determine if gingival fibroblasts are affected by the composition of the bioabsorbable membranes used in mucogingival surgery. METHODS: Two type of bioabsorbable regenerative materials were used as cell carriers. Wistar rat gingival fibroblasts (RGF) were obtained from attached gingiva, cut into small fragments, and placed in culture dishes. When confluent, cells were detached using trypsin and identified as "first transferred cells" (P1). At the third passage (P3), cell count, trypan blue exclusion test, acid phosphatase activity, DNA synthesis, phase contrast microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were performed. The cells were then placed in wells containing the membranes and incubated for 72 hours. RESULTS: When examined under microscopy, the control wells (without membranes) showed one cell type with the elongated appearance characteristic of fibroblasts. The wells with membranes showed an altered cell morphology with a high proportion of cell fragments regardless of the type of membrane used. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that cell carrier membranes could affect RGF morphology and thus alter gingival tissue healing following GTR. [less ▲]

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See detailGraft of autologous fibroblasts in gingival tissue in vivo after culture in vitro. Preliminary study on rats.
Simain-Sato, Franklin ULg; Lahmouzi, Jamila ULg; Heinen, Ernst ULg et al

in Journal of Periodontal Research (1999), 34(6), 323-8

Several grafting techniques and guided tissue regeneration techniques (GTR) have been well-developed in periodontal surgery. However, these techniques could induce pain and side effects, such as a ... [more ▼]

Several grafting techniques and guided tissue regeneration techniques (GTR) have been well-developed in periodontal surgery. However, these techniques could induce pain and side effects, such as a gingival recession during the healing period following the therapy. The graft of a small autologous connective tissue, using non-invasive surgical techniques could yield several benefits for the patients. Our preliminary study explores the feasibility of collecting healthy gingival tissues, culturing them in vitro to amplify rat gingival fibroblasts (RGF) and inoculating the obtained cells into autologous rat gingival tissues in vivo. Gingival tissues samples were cultured as explants as described by Freshney et al. and Adolphe. Confluent cells surrounding explants were detached after 7 d of culture from Petri dishes using 0.05% trypsin and designated "first transferred cells" (T1). At the third passage (T3), cells cultured as monolayer were either examined under microscopy--phase contrast, scanning, or transmission electron--or numerated after trypan blue exclusion test. Autologous RGF labelled with fluorochrome were inoculated at the vestibular and palatine site of gingival tissue close to the superior incisors. In this preliminary study, 12 Wistar rats were used; for each, 2 biopsies were dissected and fixed for phase contrast or fluorescence microscopy. On d 1, 3 and 7 after injection in rat gingival tissues, fluorochrome-labelled cells could be detected in all these. [less ▲]

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