References of "Jauniaux, Thierry"
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See detailProceedings of the 1st FARAH-Day Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (University of Liege - Belgium)
Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg et al

Book published by Presses de la Faculté de Médecine vétérinaire de l’Université de Liège (2014)

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See detailIn vitro culture of seal muscle-derived satellite cells
Freichels, Astrid ULg; Baise, Etienne ULg; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

Poster (2014, April)

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See detailOrganochlorines in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) stranded along the southern North Sea between 2010 and 2013.
Mahfouz, Celine; Henry, Francoise; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

in Environmental Science. Processes & Impacts (2014), 16(12), 2774-81

7 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 6 dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDXs) and 8 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured in the blubber of 20 harbour porpoises stranded on the coasts of ... [more ▼]

7 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 6 dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDXs) and 8 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured in the blubber of 20 harbour porpoises stranded on the coasts of the southern North Sea between 2010 and 2013. The results showed that porpoises that died from infectious diseases displayed significantly higher levels of PCBs in their blubber compared to healthy porpoises that died from physical trauma. summation operator7CBs and summation operatorDDXs were higher in juvenile porpoises compared to adult females. Except for three individuals, PBDE concentrations were below the limit of quantification in the blubber samples treated. In general, levels of PCBs and DDXs obtained in the blubber of porpoises from this study were in the same order of magnitude or even lower than those obtained in the blubber of porpoises stranded along the North East Atlantic Ocean and the Black Sea over the period 1987 and 2013. The results of the present study suggest that even if the status of marine pollution has been improved, a continuous long-term contamination by toxic organochlorines over many generations may be observed. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of the health status of wild fish inhabiting a cotton basin heavily impacted by pesticides in Benin (West Africa).
Agbohessi, Prudencio T.; Imorou Toko, Ibrahim; Ouedraogo, Alfred et al

in The Science of the total environment (2014)

To determine the impact of agricultural pesticides used in cotton cultivation on the health status of fish living in a Beninese cotton basin, we compared the reproductive and hepatic systems of fish ... [more ▼]

To determine the impact of agricultural pesticides used in cotton cultivation on the health status of fish living in a Beninese cotton basin, we compared the reproductive and hepatic systems of fish sampled from rivers located in both contaminated and pristine conditions. Different types of biomarkers, including biometric indices (a condition factor K, a gonadosomatic index GSI, and a hepatosomatic index HSI), plasma levels of sex steroids (11-ketotestosterone 11-KT, testosterone T and estradiol-17beta E2) and the histopathology of the gonads and liver, were investigated for two different trophic levels of the following two fish species: the Guinean tilapia Tilapia guineensis and the African catfish Clarias gariepinus. The fish were captured during both the rainy season (when there is heavy use of pesticides on cotton fields) and the dry season from one site, in Pendjari River (reference site), which is located outside the cotton-producing basin, and from three other sites on the Alibori River within the cotton-producing basin. Comparing fish that were sampled from contaminated (high levels of endosulfan, heptachlor and DDT and metabolites) and reference sites, the results clearly indicated that agricultural pesticides significantly decreased K and GSI while they increased HSI, regardless of the season, species and sex of the fish. These pesticides also induced a decrease in the plasma levels of 11-KT and T and increased those of E2. The histopathology of the testes revealed, in both species, a high rate of testicular oocytes, up to 50% in the African catfish, downstream of the Alibori River, which indicated estrogenic effects from the pesticides. The disruption of male spermatogenesis primarily included necrosis, fibrosis and the presence of foam cells in the lobular lumen. The histopathology of the ovaries revealed high levels of pre-ovulatory follicular atresia, impaired oogenesis, a decrease in the oocyte vitellogenic diameter and other lesions, such as fibrosis, vacuolation and melano-macrophagic centers. The histopathology of the liver revealed the presence of necrosis, hypertrophic hepatocytes, foci of vacuolation, glycogen depletion and hemosiderin. An assessment of the general health of the fish indicated that all of the sampled fish from the polluted sites were in poorer health compared with those from the reference site but that the African catfish appeared much more affected than the Guinean tilapia, regardless of the sex and season. In conclusion, the overall results indicated that agricultural pesticides significantly impair the endocrine regulation of fish living in the Beninese cotton basin and that this would most likely be one of the causes of the severe damage observed in the liver and gonads and the reduced health condition. [less ▲]

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See detailUltrastructure of the Odontocete Organ of Corti: Scanning and transmission electron microscopy.
Morell, Maria; Lenoir, Marc; Shadwick, Robert E. et al

in The Journal of comparative neurology (2014)

The morphological study of the Odontocete organ of Corti, together with possible alterations associated with damage from sound exposure, represents a key conservation approach to assess the effects of ... [more ▼]

The morphological study of the Odontocete organ of Corti, together with possible alterations associated with damage from sound exposure, represents a key conservation approach to assess the effects of acoustic pollution on marine ecosystems. By collaborating with stranding networks from several European countries, 150 ears from 13 species of Odontocetes were collected and analyzed by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. Based on our analyses, we first describe and compare Odontocete cochlear structures and then propose a diagnostic method to identify inner ear alterations in stranded individuals. The two species analyzed by TEM (Phocoena phocoena and Stenella coeruleoalba) showed morphological characteristics in the lower basal turn of high-frequency hearing species. Among other striking features, outer hair cell bodies were extremely small and were strongly attached to Deiters cells. Such morphological characteristics, shared with horseshoe bats, suggest that there has been convergent evolution of sound reception mechanisms among echolocating species. Despite possible autolytic artifacts due to technical and experimental constraints, the SEM analysis allowed us to detect the presence of scarring processes resulting from the disappearance of outer hair cells from the epithelium. In addition, in contrast to the rapid decomposition process of the sensory epithelium after death (especially of the inner hair cells), the tectorial membrane appeared to be more resistant to postmortem autolysis effects. Analysis of the stereocilia imprint pattern at the undersurface of the tectorial membrane may provide a way to detect possible ultrastructural alterations of the hair cell stereocilia by mirroring them on the tectorial membrane. J. Comp. Neurol., 2014. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailHarbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) stranded alongthesouthern NorthSea:An assessment through metallic contamination
Mahfouz, C.; Henry, F.; Courcot, L. et al

in Environmental Research (2014), 133

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See detailPostglacial climate changes and rise of three ecotypes of harbor porpoises, Phocoena phocoena, in western Palearctic waters
Fontaine, Michaël; Roland, K.; Calves, I. et al

in Molecular Ecology (2014)

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See detailIs Dolphin Morbillivirus Virulent for White-Beaked Dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris)?
van Elk, C. E.; van de Bildt, M. W. G.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

in Veterinary pathology (2014)

The virulence of morbilliviruses for toothed whales (odontocetes) appears to differ according to host species. In 4 species of odontocetes, morbilliviruses are highly virulent, causing large-scale ... [more ▼]

The virulence of morbilliviruses for toothed whales (odontocetes) appears to differ according to host species. In 4 species of odontocetes, morbilliviruses are highly virulent, causing large-scale epizootics with high mortality. In 8 other species of odontocetes, including white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris), morbilliviruses have been found as an incidental infection. In these species, the virulence of morbilliviruses is not clear. Therefore, the admission of 2 white-beaked dolphins with morbillivirus infection into a rehabilitation center provided a unique opportunity to investigate the virulence of morbillivirus in this species. By phylogenetic analysis, the morbilliviruses in both animals were identified as a dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) most closely related to that detected in a white-beaked dolphin in Germany in 2007. Both animals were examined clinically and pathologically. Case No. 1 had a chronic neural DMV infection, characterized by polioencephalitis in the cerebrum and morbillivirus antigen expression limited to neurons and glial cells. Surprisingly, no nervous signs were observed in this animal during the 6 months before death. Case No. 2 had a subacute systemic DMV infection, characterized by interstitial pneumonia, leucopenia, lymphoid depletion, and DMV antigen expression in mononuclear cells and syncytia in the lung and in mononuclear cells in multiple lymphoid organs. Cause of death was not attributed to DMV infection in either animal. DMV was not detected in 2 contemporaneously stranded white-beaked dolphins. Stranding rate did not increase in the region. These results suggest that DMV is not highly virulent for white-beaked dolphins. [less ▲]

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See detailDirect evidence for gray seal (Halichoerus grypus) predation and scavenging on harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)
Bouveroux, T.; Kiszka, J.; Heithaus, R. et al

in Marine Mammal Science (2014)

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See detailIs dolphin morbillivirus virulent for white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris)?
van Elk, N.; van de Bildt, M.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

in Veterinary Pathology (2014)

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See detailProceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg et al

Book published by Presses de la Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire (2013)

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See detailFatal plastic impaction in a minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata)
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Haelters, J.; Degraer, S. et al

Scientific conference (2013)

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See detailBrucellosis in two seal pups
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Didier, M.; Fretin, D. et al

Conference (2013)

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See detailBrucella surveillance in stranded marine mammals from the North Sea
Alonso-Velaco, E.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Michel, P. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailBrucella surveillance in stranded marine mammals from the North Sea
Alonso-Velasco, E.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Michel, P. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailThe stranding anomaly as population indicator: the case of harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena in North-Western Europe.
Peltier, Helene; Baagoe, Hans J.; Camphuysen, Kees C. J. et al

in PloS one (2013), 8(4), 62180

Ecological indicators for monitoring strategies are expected to combine three major characteristics: ecological significance, statistical credibility, and cost-effectiveness. Strategies based on stranding ... [more ▼]

Ecological indicators for monitoring strategies are expected to combine three major characteristics: ecological significance, statistical credibility, and cost-effectiveness. Strategies based on stranding networks rank highly in cost-effectiveness, but their ecological significance and statistical credibility are disputed. Our present goal is to improve the value of stranding data as population indicator as part of monitoring strategies by constructing the spatial and temporal null hypothesis for strandings. The null hypothesis is defined as: small cetacean distribution and mortality are uniform in space and constant in time. We used a drift model to map stranding probabilities and predict stranding patterns of cetacean carcasses under H0 across the North Sea, the Channel and the Bay of Biscay, for the period 1990-2009. As the most common cetacean occurring in this area, we chose the harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena for our modelling. The difference between these strandings expected under H0 and observed strandings is defined as the stranding anomaly. It constituted the stranding data series corrected for drift conditions. Seasonal decomposition of stranding anomaly suggested that drift conditions did not explain observed seasonal variations of porpoise strandings. Long-term stranding anomalies increased first in the southern North Sea, the Channel and Bay of Biscay coasts, and finally the eastern North Sea. The hypothesis of changes in porpoise distribution was consistent with local visual surveys, mostly SCANS surveys (1994 and 2005). This new indicator could be applied to cetacean populations across the world and more widely to marine megafauna. [less ▲]

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See detailIntestinal volvulus in cetaceans
Begeman, L.; St. Leger, J.; Blyde, D. et al

in Veterinary Pathology (2013)

Intestinal volvulus was recognized as the cause of death in 18 cetaceans, including 8 species of toothed whales (suborder Odontoceti). Cases originated from 11 institutions from around the world and ... [more ▼]

Intestinal volvulus was recognized as the cause of death in 18 cetaceans, including 8 species of toothed whales (suborder Odontoceti). Cases originated from 11 institutions from around the world and included both captive (n = 9) and free-ranging (n = 9) animals. When the clinical history was available (n = 9), animals consistently demonstrated acute dullness 1 to 5 days prior to death. In 3 of these animals (33%), there was a history of chronic gastrointestinal illness. The pathological findings were similar to those described in other animal species and humans, and consisted of intestinal volvulus and a well-demarcated segment of distended, congested, and edematous intestine with gas and bloody fluid contents. Associated lesions included congested and edematous mesentery and mesenteric lymph nodes, and often serofibrinous or hemorrhagic abdominal effusion. The volvulus involved the cranial part of the intestines in 85% (11 of 13). Potential predisposing causes were recognized in most cases (13 of 18, 72%) but were variable. Further studies investigating predisposing factors are necessary to help prevent occurrence and enhance early clinical diagnosis and management of the condition. [less ▲]

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See detailProceedings of the 2nd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (University of Liège – Belgium)
Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg et al

Book published by Presses de la Faculté de Médecine vétérinaire de l’Université de Liège (2012)

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