References of "Jauniaux, Thierry"
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See detailIn vitro culture of seal muscle-derived satellite cells
Freichels, Astrid ULg; Baise, Etienne ULg; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

Poster (2014, April)

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See detailCould the chemical contamination be the cause of the increase in the number of stranded harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) along the Southern North Sea?
Mahfouz, C.; Henry, F.; Pezeril, S. et al

in Environmental Research (2014)

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See detailPostglacial climate changes and rise of three ecotypes of harbor porpoises, Phocoena phocoena, in western Palearctic waters
Fontaine, Michaël; Roland, K.; Calves, I. et al

in Molecular Ecology (2014)

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See detailIs Dolphin Morbillivirus Virulent for White-Beaked Dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris)?
van Elk, C. E.; van de Bildt, M. W. G.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

in Veterinary pathology (2014)

The virulence of morbilliviruses for toothed whales (odontocetes) appears to differ according to host species. In 4 species of odontocetes, morbilliviruses are highly virulent, causing large-scale ... [more ▼]

The virulence of morbilliviruses for toothed whales (odontocetes) appears to differ according to host species. In 4 species of odontocetes, morbilliviruses are highly virulent, causing large-scale epizootics with high mortality. In 8 other species of odontocetes, including white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris), morbilliviruses have been found as an incidental infection. In these species, the virulence of morbilliviruses is not clear. Therefore, the admission of 2 white-beaked dolphins with morbillivirus infection into a rehabilitation center provided a unique opportunity to investigate the virulence of morbillivirus in this species. By phylogenetic analysis, the morbilliviruses in both animals were identified as a dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) most closely related to that detected in a white-beaked dolphin in Germany in 2007. Both animals were examined clinically and pathologically. Case No. 1 had a chronic neural DMV infection, characterized by polioencephalitis in the cerebrum and morbillivirus antigen expression limited to neurons and glial cells. Surprisingly, no nervous signs were observed in this animal during the 6 months before death. Case No. 2 had a subacute systemic DMV infection, characterized by interstitial pneumonia, leucopenia, lymphoid depletion, and DMV antigen expression in mononuclear cells and syncytia in the lung and in mononuclear cells in multiple lymphoid organs. Cause of death was not attributed to DMV infection in either animal. DMV was not detected in 2 contemporaneously stranded white-beaked dolphins. Stranding rate did not increase in the region. These results suggest that DMV is not highly virulent for white-beaked dolphins. [less ▲]

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See detailDirect evidence for gray seal (Halichoerus grypus) predation and scavenging on harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)
Bouveroux, T.; Kiszka, J.; Heithaus, R. et al

in Marine Mammal Science (2014)

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See detailIs dolphin morbillivirus virulent for white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris)?
van Elk, N.; van de Bildt, M.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

in Veterinary Pathology (2014)

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See detailProceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg et al

Book published by Presses de la Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire (2013)

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See detailFatal plastic impaction in a minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata)
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Haelters, J.; Degraer, S. et al

Scientific conference (2013)

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See detailBrucellosis in two seal pups
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Didier, M.; Fretin, D. et al

Conference (2013)

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See detailBrucella surveillance in stranded marine mammals from the North Sea
Alonso-Velaco, E.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Michel, P. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailBrucella surveillance in stranded marine mammals from the North Sea
Alonso-Velasco, E.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Michel, P. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailThe stranding anomaly as population indicator: the case of harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena in North-Western Europe.
Peltier, Helene; Baagoe, Hans J.; Camphuysen, Kees C. J. et al

in PloS one (2013), 8(4), 62180

Ecological indicators for monitoring strategies are expected to combine three major characteristics: ecological significance, statistical credibility, and cost-effectiveness. Strategies based on stranding ... [more ▼]

Ecological indicators for monitoring strategies are expected to combine three major characteristics: ecological significance, statistical credibility, and cost-effectiveness. Strategies based on stranding networks rank highly in cost-effectiveness, but their ecological significance and statistical credibility are disputed. Our present goal is to improve the value of stranding data as population indicator as part of monitoring strategies by constructing the spatial and temporal null hypothesis for strandings. The null hypothesis is defined as: small cetacean distribution and mortality are uniform in space and constant in time. We used a drift model to map stranding probabilities and predict stranding patterns of cetacean carcasses under H0 across the North Sea, the Channel and the Bay of Biscay, for the period 1990-2009. As the most common cetacean occurring in this area, we chose the harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena for our modelling. The difference between these strandings expected under H0 and observed strandings is defined as the stranding anomaly. It constituted the stranding data series corrected for drift conditions. Seasonal decomposition of stranding anomaly suggested that drift conditions did not explain observed seasonal variations of porpoise strandings. Long-term stranding anomalies increased first in the southern North Sea, the Channel and Bay of Biscay coasts, and finally the eastern North Sea. The hypothesis of changes in porpoise distribution was consistent with local visual surveys, mostly SCANS surveys (1994 and 2005). This new indicator could be applied to cetacean populations across the world and more widely to marine megafauna. [less ▲]

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See detailIntestinal volvulus in cetaceans
Begeman, L.; St. Leger, J.; Blyde, D. et al

in Veterinary Pathology (2013)

Intestinal volvulus was recognized as the cause of death in 18 cetaceans, including 8 species of toothed whales (suborder Odontoceti). Cases originated from 11 institutions from around the world and ... [more ▼]

Intestinal volvulus was recognized as the cause of death in 18 cetaceans, including 8 species of toothed whales (suborder Odontoceti). Cases originated from 11 institutions from around the world and included both captive (n = 9) and free-ranging (n = 9) animals. When the clinical history was available (n = 9), animals consistently demonstrated acute dullness 1 to 5 days prior to death. In 3 of these animals (33%), there was a history of chronic gastrointestinal illness. The pathological findings were similar to those described in other animal species and humans, and consisted of intestinal volvulus and a well-demarcated segment of distended, congested, and edematous intestine with gas and bloody fluid contents. Associated lesions included congested and edematous mesentery and mesenteric lymph nodes, and often serofibrinous or hemorrhagic abdominal effusion. The volvulus involved the cranial part of the intestines in 85% (11 of 13). Potential predisposing causes were recognized in most cases (13 of 18, 72%) but were variable. Further studies investigating predisposing factors are necessary to help prevent occurrence and enhance early clinical diagnosis and management of the condition. [less ▲]

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See detailProceedings of the 2nd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (University of Liège – Belgium)
Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg et al

Book published by Presses de la Faculté de Médecine vétérinaire de l’Université de Liège (2012)

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See detailWATER-BORNE EMERGING ZOONOSE? CASE REPORT ON ERYSIPELAS (ERYSIPELOTHRIX RHUSIOPATHIAE) IN HARBOUR PORPOISES (PHOCOENA PHOCOENA) AND HARBOUR SEAL (PHOCA VITULINA).
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

Poster (2012, March 26)

An adult female harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) and a juvenile male harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) have been found stranded dead on the Belgian coast in late 2001. As the two bodies were in good ... [more ▼]

An adult female harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) and a juvenile male harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) have been found stranded dead on the Belgian coast in late 2001. As the two bodies were in good condition (CC = 2), necropsy and bacteriological analyses were performed as well as other postmortem investigations. Blood heart and organs (liver, digestive and respiratory tract, lungs, spleen, brain, kidneys) samples have been collected and analyzed. The porpoise showed evidence of septicaemia, and the seal presented lesions of acute enteritis. Pure and abundant growth of a small rod-shaped, Gram-labile bacterium was obtained aerobically and anaerobically on Columbia blood agar from heart blood, mouth, pharynx, lungs, intestine and anus of the porpoise, and from intestine, pharynx, mouth, nose and anus of the seal. The colonies were surrounded by a narrow zone of alpha-hemolysis. Catalase- and peroxydase-tests gave negative results. Rapid ID 32 Strepto (Biomérieux, France) sugar tests identified this isolate as Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. E. rhusiopathiae could be therefore considered as the cause of septicaemia on the porpoise as it was present in heart blood and internal organs, and could be associated primary or secondary with the enteritis reported on the seal as the bacterium was isolated in pure culture in the digestive tract. E. rhusiopathiae infections have been reported in captive dolphins and sea lions. This zoonotic pathogen is also involved in human local infections, like the “seal finger”, resulting from captive pinnipeds bites. However, it has not been so far described as systemic pathogens of wild cetaceans and pinnipeds. E. rhusiopathiae could be therefore considered as a potentially emergent pathogen which could have important repercussions on human health, particularly veterinarians, marine mammals rescue teams and zoos. [less ▲]

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See detailBrucellosis in marine mammals stranded on the Belgian and northern France coast
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Brenez, C.; Fretin, D. et al

Conference (2012)

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See detailBrucella ceti infection in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Brenez, C.; Fretin, D. et al

Scientific conference (2012)

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See detailBrucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis infections in marine mammals
Godfroid, J.; Nymo, I.; Tryland, M. et al

in Aguirre, A.; Ostfeld, R.; Daszak, P. (Eds.) New directions in conservation medicine applied cases of ecological health (2012)

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See detailThe grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) as a predator of harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)?
Haelters, Jan; Kerckhof, Francis; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

in Aquatic Mammals (2012), 38

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