References of "Jacquemin, Ingrid"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailUsing a dynamic vegetation model for future projections of crop yields : application to Belgium in the framework of the VOTES and MASC projects
Jacquemin, Ingrid ULg; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; Fontaine, Corentin M. et al

Poster (2016, April 22)

Dynamic vegetation models (DVM) were initially designed to describe the dynamics of natural ecosystems as a function of climate and soil, to study the role of the vegetation in the carbon cycle. These ... [more ▼]

Dynamic vegetation models (DVM) were initially designed to describe the dynamics of natural ecosystems as a function of climate and soil, to study the role of the vegetation in the carbon cycle. These models are now directly coupled with climate models in order to evaluate feedbacks between vegetation and climate. But DVM characteristics allow numerous other applications, leading to amelioration of some of their modules (e.g., evaluating sensitivity of the hydrological module to land surface changes) and developments (e.g., coupling with other models like agent-based models), to be used in ecosystem management and land use planning studies. It is in this dynamic context about DVMs that we have adapted the CARAIB (CARbon Assimilation In the Biosphere) model. One of the main improvements is the implementation of a crop module, allowing the assessment of climate change impacts on crop yields. We try to validate this module at different scales: - from the plot level, with the use of eddy-covariance data from agricultural sites in the FLUXNET network, such as Lonzée (Belgium) or other Western European sites (Grignon, Dijkgraaf,. . . ), - to the country level, for which we compare the crop yield calculated by CARAIB to the crop yield statistics for Belgium and for different agricultural regions of the country. Another challenge for the CARAIB DVM was to deal with the landscape dynamics, which is not directly possible due to the lack of consideration of anthropogenic factors in the system. In the framework of the VOTES and the MASC projects, CARAIB is coupled with an agent-based model (ABM), representing the societal component of the system. This coupled module allows the use of climate and socio-economic scenarios, particularly interesting for studies which aim at ensuring a sustainable approach. This module has particularly been exploited in the VOTES project, where the objective was to provide a social, biophysical and economic assessment of the ecosystem services in four municipalities under urban pressure in the center of Belgium. The biophysical valuation was carried out with the coupled module, allowing a quantitative evaluation of key ecosystem services as a function of three climatic and socio-economic scenarios. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (8 ULg)
See detailHigh-resolution climate and land surface interactions modeling over Belgium: current state and decennial scale projections
Jacquemin, Ingrid ULg; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; Beckers, Veronique et al

Poster (2016, April 21)

The interactions between land surface and climate are complex. Climate changes can affect ecosystem structure and functions, by altering photosynthesis and productivity or inducing thermal and hydric ... [more ▼]

The interactions between land surface and climate are complex. Climate changes can affect ecosystem structure and functions, by altering photosynthesis and productivity or inducing thermal and hydric stresses on plant species. These changes then impact socio-economic systems, through e.g., lower farming or forestry incomes. Ultimately, it can lead to permanent changes in land use structure, especially when associated with other non-climatic factors, such as urbanization pressure. These interactions and changes have feedbacks on the climate systems, in terms of changing: (1) surface properties (albedo, roughness, evapotranspiration, etc.) and (2) greenhouse gas emissions (mainly CO2, CH4, N2O). In the framework of the MASC project (« Modelling and Assessing Surface Change impacts on Belgian and Western European climate »), we aim at improving regional climate model projections at the decennial scale over Belgium and Western Europe by combining high-resolution models of climate, land surface dynamics and socio-economic processes. The land surface dynamics (LSD) module is composed of a dynamic vegetation model (CARAIB) calculating the productivity and growth of natural and managed vegetation, and an agent-based model (CRAFTY), determining the shifts in land use and land cover. This up-scaled LSD module is made consistent with the surface scheme of the regional climate model (RCM: ALARO) to allow simulations of the RCM with a fully dynamic land surface for the recent past and the period 2000-2030. In this contribution, we analyze the results of the first simulations performed with the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model over Belgium at a resolution of 1km. This analysis is performed at the species level, using a set of 17 species for natural vegetation (trees and grasses) and 10 crops, especially designed to represent the Belgian vegetation. The CARAIB model is forced with surface atmospheric variables derived from the monthly global CRU climatology or ALARO outputs (from a 4 km resolution simulation) for the recent past and the decennial projections. Evidently, these simulations lead to a first analysis of the impact of climate change on carbon stocks (e.g., biomass, soil carbon) and fluxes (e.g., gross and net primary productivities (GPP and NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP)). The surface scheme is based on two land use/land cover databases, ECOPLAN for the Flemish region and, for the Walloon region, the COS-Wallonia database and the Belgian agricultural statistics for agricultural land. Land use and land cover are fixed through time (reference year: 2007) in these simulations, but a first attempt of coupling between CARAIB and CRAFTY will be made to establish dynamic land use change scenarios for the next decades. A simulation with variable land use would allow an analysis of land use change impacts not only on crop yields and the land carbon budget, but also on climate relevant parameters, such as surface albedo, roughness length and evapotranspiration towards a coupling with the RCM. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (7 ULg)
See detailDrought-related vulnerability and risk assessment of groundwater in Belgium: estimation of the groundwater recharge and crop yield vulnerability with the B-CGMS
Jacquemin, Ingrid ULg; Verbeiren, Boud; Vanderhaegen, Sven et al

Poster (2016, April 19)

Due to common belief that regions under temperate climate are not affected by (meteorological and groundwater) drought, these events and their impacts remain poorly studied: in the GroWaDRISK, we propose ... [more ▼]

Due to common belief that regions under temperate climate are not affected by (meteorological and groundwater) drought, these events and their impacts remain poorly studied: in the GroWaDRISK, we propose to take stock of this question. We aim at providing a better understanding of the influencing factors (land use and land cover changes, water demand and climate) and the drought-related impacts on the environment, water supply and agriculture. The study area is located in the North-East of Belgium, corresponding approximatively to the Dijle and Demer catchments. To establish an overview of the groundwater situation, we assess the system input: the recharge. To achieve this goal, two models, B-CGMS and WetSpass are used to evaluate the recharge, respectively, over agricultural land and over the remaining areas, as a function of climate and for various land uses and land covers. B-CGMS, which is an adapted version for Belgium of the European Crop Growth Monitoring System, is used for assessing water recharge at a daily timestep and under different agricultural lands: arable land (winter wheat, maize...), orchards, horticulture and floriculture and for grassland. B-CGMS is designed to foresee crop yield and obviously it studies the impact of drought on crop yield and raises issues for the potential need of irrigation. For both yields and water requirements, the model proposes a potential mode, driven by temperature and solar radiation, and a water-limited mode for which water availability can limit crop growth. By this way, we can identify where and when water consumption and yield are not optimal, in addition to the Crop Water Stress Index. This index is calculated for a given crop, as the number of days affected by water stress during the growth sensitive period. Both recharge and crop yield are assessed for the current situation (1980 – 2012), taking into account the changing land use/land cover, in terms of areas and localization of the agricultural land and where the proportion of the different crops had considerably evolved through time (e.g., increase of grain maize and potatoes while winter cereals decrease). The preliminary results of the recharge lead to an average value in the area showing a significant negative trend, in both simulations with fixed (base = 1980) and changing land cover. In the same time, we could observe an increasing number of water stress periods, especially for maize, one of the main crops in the area. Finally, a preliminary test will be presented for the horizon 2040, for which we use meteorological time series (for high and low hydrologic impacts) given by the CCI-HYDR Perturbation Tool (Ntegeka V. and Willems P., 2009). This preliminary test aims to (1) evaluate the amplitude of the potential recharge deficit and, (2) especially, to define vulnerability zones, affected by frequent water stress, in connection with irrigation needs which could possibly increase the groundwater extraction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClassifying simulated wheat yield responses to changes in temperature and precipitation across a european transect
Fronzek, S.; Pirttioja, N.; Carter, T. R. et al

Conference (2016, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (9 ULg)
See detailAssessing the Risk of Ecosystem Disruption in Europe using a Dynamic Vegetation Model driven by CMIP5 Regional Climatic Projections from EURO-CORDEX
Dury, Marie ULg; Hambuckers, Alain ULg; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg et al

Conference (2015, December 18)

While the combination of warmer and drier mean climatic conditions can have severe impacts on ecosystems, extreme events like droughts or heat waves that break the gradual climate change can have more ... [more ▼]

While the combination of warmer and drier mean climatic conditions can have severe impacts on ecosystems, extreme events like droughts or heat waves that break the gradual climate change can have more long-term consequences on ecosystem composition, functioning and carbon storage. Hence, it is essential to assess the changes in climatic variability and the changes in frequency of extreme events projected for the future. Ecosystems could not be in a condition to adapt to these new conditions and might be disrupted. Here, the process-based dynamic vegetation model CARAIB DVM was used to evaluate and analyze how future climate and extreme events will affect European ecosystems. To quantify the uncertainties in the climatic projections and in their potential impacts on ecosystems, the vegetation model was driven with the outputs of different regional climatic models (RCMs), nested in CMIP5 GCM projections for the EURO-CORDEX project. We used the ALADIN version 5.3 (Météo-France/CNRM) and other EURO-CORDEX RCMs. These climatic projections are at a high spatial resolution (0.11-degree, ~12 km). CARAIB simulations were performed across Europe over the historical period 1951-2005 and the future period 2006-2100 under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. We simulated a set of 99 individual species (47 herbs, 12 shrubs and 40 trees) representing the major European ecosystem flora. First, we analyzed the climatic variability simulated by the climatic models over the historical period and compared it with the observed climatic variability. None of these climatic models can reproduce accurately the present natural climatic variability. Then, to assess the risk of ecosystem disruption in the future and to identify the vulnerable areas in Europe, we created an index combining several CARAIB outputs: runoff, mean NPP, soil turnover, burned area, appearance and disappearance of species. We evaluated the severity of change projected for these variables (period 2071-2100) relative to their current variability (period 1961-1990). Mean changes were considered severe if they exceed observed variability. The highest values of the index were found in southern Europe, indicating that the amplitude of the expected ecosystem changes largely exceeds current interannual variability in this area. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (8 ULg)
See detailAnalysing the response of European ecosystems to droughts and heat waves within ISI-MIP2 simulations
Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; Dury, Marie ULg; François, Louis ULg et al

Conference (2015, December 14)

With unprecedented speed and extent, the future climate change can be expected to severely impact terrestrial ecosystems due to more frequent extreme events, such as droughts or heat waves. What will be ... [more ▼]

With unprecedented speed and extent, the future climate change can be expected to severely impact terrestrial ecosystems due to more frequent extreme events, such as droughts or heat waves. What will be the impacts of these extreme events on ecosystem functioning and structure? How far will net primary production be reduced by such events? What will be the impact on plant mortality? Could such events trigger changes in the abundance of plant species, thus leading to biome shifts? In this contribution, we propose to use ISI-MIP2 model historical simulations from the biome sector to analyse the response of ecosystems to droughts or heat waves, trying to understand the differences between several vegetation models (e.g. CARAIB, HYBRID, LPJ). The analysis will focus on Europe. It will compare and assess the model responses for a series of well-marked drought or heat wave events in the simulated historical period, such as those that occurred in 1976, 2003 or 2010. This analysis will be performed in terms of several important environmental variables, like soil water and hydric stress, runoff, PFT abundance, net primary productivity and biomass, fire frequency, turnover of soil organic matter, etc. Whenever possible, the response of the model will be compared to available data for the most recent well-marked events. Examples of data to be used are eddy covariance, satellite data (including leaf area and fire occurrence) or tree rings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation de la vulnérabilité et du risque associés à la sécheresse des nappes phréatiques en Belgique : simulation de la recharge au niveau des zones agricoles avec le modèle B-CGMS
Jacquemin, Ingrid ULg; Verbeiren, Boud; Uljee, Inge et al

Conference (2015, July 02)

Groundwater drought remains poorly studied under temperate climate. The GroWaDRISK project aims at covering this gap by studying the influencing factors and the drought-related impacts on the environment ... [more ▼]

Groundwater drought remains poorly studied under temperate climate. The GroWaDRISK project aims at covering this gap by studying the influencing factors and the drought-related impacts on the environment, water supply and agriculture in the area of the Dijle and Demer catchment. In order to evaluate the current recharge (1980-2012), both models B-CGMS and WetSpass are used under various land uses and land covers. Only BCGMS will be presented in this paper. The model will be adapted in order to be applied on agricultural land: for arable land (winter wheat, maize,…), orchards, horticulture and floriculture areas and for meadows and grassland classes. The use of this model can be justified by the precision, from both spatial and temporal, which allow us to propose a more accurate recharge assessment in function of the main crops of the study area. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (2 ULg)
See detailQuantifying drought effects on groundwater recharge in a human-influenced catchment
Verbeiren, Boud; Huysmans, Marijke; Vanderhaegen, Sven et al

Conference (2015, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModelling carbon fluxes of forest and grassland ecosystems in Western Europe using the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model: evaluation against eddy covariance data.
Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; François, Louis ULg; Dury, Marie ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Eddy covariance measurements are an essential resource to understand how ecosystem carbon fluxes react in response to climate change, and to help to evaluate and validate the performance of land surface ... [more ▼]

Eddy covariance measurements are an essential resource to understand how ecosystem carbon fluxes react in response to climate change, and to help to evaluate and validate the performance of land surface and vegetation models at regional and global scale. In the framework of the MASC project (« Modelling and Assessing Surface Change impacts on Belgian and Western European climate »), vegetation dynamics and carbon fluxes of forest and grassland ecosystems simulated by the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model (Dury et al., iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, 4:82-99, 2011) are evaluated and validated by comparison of the model predictions with eddy covariance data. Here carbon fluxes (e.g. net ecosystem exchange (NEE), gross primary productivity (GPP), and ecosystem respiration (RECO)) and evapotranspiration (ET) simulated with the CARAIB model are compared with the fluxes measured at several eddy covariance flux tower sites in Belgium and Western Europe, chosen from the FLUXNET global network (http://fluxnet.ornl.gov/). CARAIB is forced either with surface atmospheric variables derived from the global CRU climatology, or with in situ meteorological data. Several tree (e.g. Pinus sylvestris, Fagus sylvatica, Picea abies) and grass species (e.g. Poaceae, Asteraceae) are simulated, depending on the species encountered on the studied sites. The aim of our work is to assess the model ability to reproduce the daily, seasonal and interannual variablility of carbon fluxes and the carbon dynamics of forest and grassland ecosystems in Belgium and Western Europe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (21 ULg)
Full Text
See detailunité: Eau-Environnement-Développement (ULg Campus Arlon): la télédétection au service de l'agriculture
Wellens, Joost ULg; Lang, Marie ULg; Benabdelouahab, Tarik et al

Diverse speeche and writing (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (18 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA crop model ensemble analysis of temperature and precipitation effects on wheat yield across a European transect using impact response surfaces"
Pirttioja, Nina; Carter, Timothy; Fronzek, Stefan et al

in Climate Research (2015), 65

This study aims to explore the utility of the impact response surface (IRS) approach for investigating model ensemble crop yield responses under a large range of changes in climate. IRSs of spring and ... [more ▼]

This study aims to explore the utility of the impact response surface (IRS) approach for investigating model ensemble crop yield responses under a large range of changes in climate. IRSs of spring and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) yields were constructed from a 26-member ensemble of process-based crop simulation models for sites in Finland, Germany and Spain across a latitudinal transect in Europe. The sensitivity of modelled yield to systematic increments of changes in temperature (-2 to +9°C) and precipitation (-50 to +50%) was tested by modifying values of 1981–2010 baseline daily weather, with CO2 concentration fixed at 360 ppm. The IRS approach offers an effective method of portraying model behaviour under changing climate as well as advantages for analysing, comparing and presenting results from multi-model ensemble simulations. Though individual model behaviour may depart markedly from the average, ensemble median responses across sites and crop varieties indicate that yields decline with higher temperatures and decreased precipitation and increase with higher precipitation. Across the uncertainty ranges defined for the IRSs, yields are more sensitive to temperature than precipitation changes at the Finnish site while sensitivities are mixed at the German and Spanish sites. Precipitation effects diminish under higher temperature changes. While the bivariate and multi-model characteristics of the analysis impose some limits to interpretation, the IRS approach nonetheless provides additional insights into sensitivities to inter-model and inter-annual variability. Taken together, these sensitivities may help to pinpoint processes such as heat stress, vernalisation or drought effects requiring refinement in future model development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (9 ULg)
See detailDifferentiating between influencing factors land use and climate to assess drought effects on groundwater recharge in a temperate context
Verbeiren, Boud; Huysmans, Marijke; Vanderhaegen, Sven et al

Conference (2014, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan a global dynamic vegetation model be used for both grassland and crop modeling at the local scale?
Minet, Julien ULg; Tychon, Bernard ULg; Jacquemin, Ingrid ULg et al

Poster (2014, February)

We report on the use of a dynamic vegetation model, CARAIB, within two modeling exercises in the framework of MACSUR. CARAIB is a physically-based, mechanistic model that calculates the carbon ... [more ▼]

We report on the use of a dynamic vegetation model, CARAIB, within two modeling exercises in the framework of MACSUR. CARAIB is a physically-based, mechanistic model that calculates the carbon assimilation of the vegetation as a function of the soil and climatic conditions. Within MACSUR, it was used in the model intercomparison exercises for grassland and crop modeling, in the LiveM 2.4 and CropM WP4 tasks, respectively. For grassland modeling, blind model runs at 11 locations were performed for various time ranges (few years). For crop modeling, a sensitivity analysis for building impact response surfaces (IRS) was performed, based on a bench of model runs at different levels of perturbation in the temperature and precipitation input data over 30 years. For grassland modeling, specific management functions accounting for the cutting or grazing of the grass were added to the model, in the framework of the MACSUR intercomparison. Initially developed for modeling the carbon dynamics of the natural vegetation, CARAIB was already adapted for crop modeling but further modifications regarding the management, i.e., yearly-dependent sowing dates, were introduced. For grassland modeling, simulation results will be further intercompared with other modeling groups, but preliminary results showed that the model could cope with the introduction of the grass cutting module. For crop modeling, building the IRS over 30 years permitted to assess the sensitivity of the model to temperature and precipitation changes. So far, the participation of CARAIB in the intercomparison exercises within MACSUR resulted in further improvements of the model by introducing new functionalities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImplementing agricultural land-use in the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model
François, Louis ULg; Jacquemin, Ingrid ULg; Fontaine, Corentin et al

Conference (2014)

CARAIB (Dury et al., iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, 4:82-99, 2011) is a state-of-the-art dynamic vegetation model with various modules dealing with (i) soil hydrology, (ii) photosynthesis/stomatal ... [more ▼]

CARAIB (Dury et al., iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, 4:82-99, 2011) is a state-of-the-art dynamic vegetation model with various modules dealing with (i) soil hydrology, (ii) photosynthesis/stomatal regulation, (iii) carbon allocation and biomass growth, (iv) litter/soil carbon dynamics, (v) vegetation cover dynamics, (vi) seed dispersal, and (vii) vegetation fires. Climate and atmospheric CO2 are the primary inputs. The model calculates all major water and CO2/carbon fluxes and pools. It can be run with plant functional types or species (up to 100 different species) at various spatial scales, from the municipality to country or continental levels. Within the VOTES project (Fontaine et al., Journal of Land Use Science, 2013, DOI:10.1080/1747423X.2013.786150), the model has been improved to include crops and meadows, and some modules have been written to translate model outputs into quantitative indicators of ecosystem services (e.g., evaluate crop yield from net primary productivity or calculate soil erosion from runoff, slope, grown species and various soil attributes). The model was run over an area covering four municipalities in central Belgium, where land-use is dominated by crops, meadows, housing and some forests and was introduced in the model at the land parcel level. Simulations were also performed for the future. In these simulations, CARAIB was combined with the Aporia Agent-Based Model, to project land-use changes up to 2050. This approach is currently extended within the MASC project (funded by Belgian Science Policy, BELSPO) to the whole Belgian territory (at 1 km2) and to Western Europe (at 20 km x 20 km). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTowards Participatory Integrated Valuation and Modelling of Ecosystem Services under Land-use Change
Fontaine, C.; Dendoncker, N.; De Vreese, R. et al

in Journal of Land Use Science (2014), 9

The lack of consideration for Ecosystem Services (ES) values in current decision-making is recognised as one of the main reasons leading to an intense competition and arguably unsustainable use of well ... [more ▼]

The lack of consideration for Ecosystem Services (ES) values in current decision-making is recognised as one of the main reasons leading to an intense competition and arguably unsustainable use of well-located available land. In this paper, we present a framework for the Valuation Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Services (VOTES), aiming at structuring a methodology that is applicable for valuing ES in a given area through a set of indicators that are both meaningful for local actors and scientifically constructed. Examples from a case study area in central Belgium are used to illustrate the methodology: a stepwise procedure starting with the valuation of ES at present. The valuation of the social, biophysical and economic dimensions of ES are based on current land-use patterns. Subsequently, scenarios of land-use change are used to explore potential losses (and/or gains) of ES in the future of the study area. With the VOTES framework, we aim at [1] incorporating stakeholders inputs to widen the valuation process and increase trust in policy-oriented approach; [2] integrating valuation of ES with a sustainable development stance accounting for land-use change; and [3] developing suggestions to policy-makers for integrating ES monitoring in policy developments. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 133 (46 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA System-based Paradigm of Drought Analysis for Operational Management
Tsakiris, Georges; Nalbantis, Ioannis; Vangelis, Harris et al

in Water Resources Management (2013), 27

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDrought-related vulnerability and risk assessment of groundwater resources under temperate conditions
Verbeiren, Boud; Huysmans, Marijke; Tychon, Bernard ULg et al

Conference (2013, September)

Drought hazards are usually associated with (semi-)arid regions. Due to the assumed insignificance of drought hazards under temperate conditions this field remains poorly studied. This study aims at ... [more ▼]

Drought hazards are usually associated with (semi-)arid regions. Due to the assumed insignificance of drought hazards under temperate conditions this field remains poorly studied. This study aims at filling this gap by: (1) Increasing understanding of influencing factors determining drought in a temperate context; (2) Developing a methodology and quantitative tools aimed at planning and decision support with respect to groundwater management. In the first place drought is a phenomenon caused by deficient precipitation for a large area and significant duration and as such it is mainly a meteorological-related hazard. In case the temporary water deficiency affects groundwater bodies, the term groundwater drought is used. Groundwater droughts develop slowly but can have considerable socio-economic and environmental consequences. Groundwater drought is a complex phenomenon. Three main variables are important: groundwater recharge, groundwater level and groundwater discharge. Groundwater recharge is important as it is the source (inflow) of all groundwater. The groundwater table gives an indication of the storage, while groundwater discharge represents the outflow from the groundwater system. Next to natural meteorological variations also human induced factors play a role. In the Belgian context the main influencing factors determining the inflow and potentially resulting in a recharge deficit and an overall deterioration of groundwater resources are climate and land use/land cover. Groundwater demand for human activities has a direct effect on groundwater storage (level). The combined effect of these factors makes that some groundwater bodies are under pressure. In these groundwater bodies the outflow exceeds the inflow generating a reduction in storage and hence an unsustainable situation. A thorough knowledge of all three influencing factors and their interaction or combined effect is essential for a reliable estimate of the groundwater budget and a sustainable management. Hence, there is a need for an improved understanding of groundwater drought and the human-induced factors influencing the groundwater balance. This should form the basis for an integrated approach which allows tackling these negative effects and safeguarding sustainability of groundwater resources. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCARAIB USER'S GUIDE
Minet, Julien ULg; Jacquemin, Ingrid ULg; François, Louis ULg

Learning material (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 163 (31 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTowards a comprehensive framework for the assessment of groundwater drought in temperate regions
Tsakiris, Georges; Nalbantis, Ioannis; Vangelis, Harris et al

Conference (2013, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)