References of "Jacobs, Nathalie"
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See detailStudy of virus-like particles of human papillomavirus in capillary electrophoresis
Bettonville, Virginie ULg; Nicol, Jérôme; Furst, Tania et al

Poster (2017)

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See detailStudy of intact virus-like particles of human papillomavirus by capillary electrophoresis
Bettonville, Virginie ULg; Nicol, Jérôme ULg; Thelen, Nicolas ULg et al

in Electrophoresis (2016), 37

Virus-like particles of human papillomavirus (HPV-VLP), resulting from the self-assembly of the capsid proteins (L1 or L1 and L2), have been widely used to study HPV as they are similar to the native ... [more ▼]

Virus-like particles of human papillomavirus (HPV-VLP), resulting from the self-assembly of the capsid proteins (L1 or L1 and L2), have been widely used to study HPV as they are similar to the native virion. Moreover, two prophylactic vaccines, Gardasil® and Cervarix®, are based on HPV-VLP L1. Analytical techniques currently used to characterize HPV-VLP, such as SDS-PAGE, Western blot, ELISA, are time-consuming and semi-quantitative. In this study, capillary electrophoresis (CE) was evaluated for the analysis of intact HPV16-VLP. The usefulness of capillary inner wall coating as well as various BGEs, pH and detergent additives were investigated. Reproducible HPV-VLP analysis in CE was achieved using poly(ethylene oxide) coated capillary and a BGE containing high salt concentration and low SDS concentration. The developed method enables HPV-VLP detection in less than 10 min (migration times RSD : 1.6 %). The identity of HPV-VLP peak was confirmed by comparison with a sample obtained from a wild-type baculovirus and with VLP-based vaccine, Gardasil®, after adjuvant dissolution. Finally, we applied the developed methodology to VLP-based vaccines, demonstrating that CE could be successfully used for vaccine quality control. [less ▲]

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See detailNatural killer and dendritic cells collaborate in the immune response induced by the vaccine against uterine cervical cancer.
Langers, Inge ULg; Renoux, Virginie; Reschner, Anca et al

in European journal of immunology (2014), 44

Virus-like particles (VLPs) of human papillomavirus (HPV) are used as a vaccine against HPV-induced cancer, and recently we have shown that these VLPs are able to activate natural killer (NK) cells. Since ... [more ▼]

Virus-like particles (VLPs) of human papillomavirus (HPV) are used as a vaccine against HPV-induced cancer, and recently we have shown that these VLPs are able to activate natural killer (NK) cells. Since NK cells collaborate with dendritic cells (DCs) to induce an immune response against viral infections and tumors, we studied the impact of this crosstalk in the context of HPV vaccination. NK cells in the presence of HPV-VLPs enhanced DC maturation as shown by an upregulation of CD86 and HLA-DR and an increased production of IL-12p70, but not of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. This activation was bi-directional. Indeed, in the presence of HPV-VLPs, DCs further activated NK cells by inducing the upregulation of cell surface activation markers (CD69 and HLA-DR). The function of NK cells was also improved as shown by an increase in IFN-gamma secretion and cytotoxic activity against an HPV+ cell line. This crosstalk between NK cells and DCs needed CD40 interaction and IL-12p70 secretion, whereas NKG2D was not implicated. Our results provide insight into how VLPs interact with innate immune cells and how NK cells and DCs play a role in the immune response induced by this vaccine agent. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailOrigin and immunoescape of uterine cervical cancer
Van hede, Dorien ULg; Langers, Inge ULg; DELVENNE, Philippe ULg et al

in Presse Médicale (2014)

Human papillomavirus associated uterine cervical cancer is an important public health problem since it is classified as the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide with more than 500 000 recorded ... [more ▼]

Human papillomavirus associated uterine cervical cancer is an important public health problem since it is classified as the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide with more than 500 000 recorded cases. This review is focused on where and why HPV infection induces cervical cancers and how this virus avoids the host immune response. Immunological therapeutic approaches are also addressed. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman papillomavirus entry into NK cells requires CD16 expression and triggers cytotoxic activity and cytokine secretion
Renoux, Virginie; Bisig, Bettina; Langers, Inge ULg et al

Poster (2013, May)

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections account for more than 50% of infection-linked cancers in women worldwide. The immune system controls, at least partially, viral infection and around 90% of HPV ... [more ▼]

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections account for more than 50% of infection-linked cancers in women worldwide. The immune system controls, at least partially, viral infection and around 90% of HPV-infected women clear the virus within two years. However, it remains unclear which immune cells are implicated in this process and no study has evaluated the direct interaction between HPVs and NK cells, a key player in host resistance to viruses and tumors. We demonstrated an NK-cell infiltration in HPV- associated preneoplastic cervical lesions. Since HPVs cannot grow in vitro, virus-like particles (VLPs) were used as a model for studying the NK-cell response against the virus. Interestingly, NK cells displayed higher cytotoxic activity and cytokine production (TNF-a and IFN-g) in the presence of HPV-VLPs. Using flow cytometry and microscopy, we observed that NK-cell stimulation was linked to rapid VLP entry into these cells by macropinocytosis. Using CD16+ and CD16- NK-cell lines and a CD16-blocking antibody, we demonstrated that CD16 is necessary for HPV–VLP internalization, as well as for degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, we show for the first time that NK cells interact with HPVs and can participate in the immune response against HPV-induced lesions. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of Gamma Delta T cells in HPV-induced Cancer Progression
Van hede, Dorien ULg; Bastin, Renaud; Francis, Floriane et al

Poster (2013, January 28)

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