References of "Hody, Stéphanie"
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See detailThe small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs) response following eccentric exercise
Hody, Stéphanie ULg

Conference (2014, May 12)

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See detailThe small Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) response following eccentric exercise
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Simonet, Arnaud; Lacrosse, Zoé ULg et al

in Abstract Book GIGA Day 2014 (2014, January 27)

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See detailLaura. Enduring – or enjoying – endurance training.
Cloes, Marc ULg; Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Jidovtseff, Boris ULg et al

in Armour, Katheleen (Ed.) Pedagogical cases in physical education and youth sport (2014)

This chapter presents a pedagogical case presenting a 15-year-old girl who met some episodes of drop in blood pressure in the morning when beginning school. Her physical education (PE) teacher has to find ... [more ▼]

This chapter presents a pedagogical case presenting a 15-year-old girl who met some episodes of drop in blood pressure in the morning when beginning school. Her physical education (PE) teacher has to find a way to deal with such situation. Three scientists from physiology, fitness training and psychology analyze the scenario and underline the knowledge that should be used by the PE teacher in order to implement appropriate lessons. Sport pedagogists propose then a concrete contribution based on this interdisciplinary analysis. Such paper is a fantastic adventure for scholars who are invited to exchange their representations, knowledge et ideas in order to develop strong approaches. The refective process is an example for preservice education but also for all practioneers and PE teacher educators. [less ▲]

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See detailIsocinétisme et douleurs musculaires d’apparition retardée
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; ROGISTER, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Movement & Sport Sciences - Science & Motricité (2014)

The curative and preventive efficiency of the isokinetic exercise, especially of the eccentric contraction, has been well demonstrated. However, intense or unusual eccentric exercise is known to induce ... [more ▼]

The curative and preventive efficiency of the isokinetic exercise, especially of the eccentric contraction, has been well demonstrated. However, intense or unusual eccentric exercise is known to induce muscle damage associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and prolonged functional deficits. These negative consequences can frequently disturb the progress of re-education or training programmes. Since they can affect athletic performance and increase the risk of musculo-skeletal injuries, the structuro-functional alterations associated with DOMS may also be problematic in athletes. Therefore, to optimize the benefits of the eccentric work while avoiding muscle damage and occurrence of DOMS should represent a major objective for the practitioners. To date, the only systematic intervention that brings muscle protection against DOMS consists of performing repeated eccentric sessions at submaximal intensity. Besides its clinical use, isokinetic constitutes an interesting model to generate and investigate the DOMS phenomenon. The original association of eccentric injuring protocols with new emerging techniques of molecular biology appears to be a promising strategy to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying exercise-induced muscle damage. Such data would provide better guidelines for prevention or treatment practice. [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic study of lumbar spinal cord after quadricipital eccentric exercise
Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2013, September 12)

Eccentric muscle contractions are characterized by an increase of muscle tension as it lengthens (slowering movements). Unaccustomed or intense eccentric exercise causes “Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness” ... [more ▼]

Eccentric muscle contractions are characterized by an increase of muscle tension as it lengthens (slowering movements). Unaccustomed or intense eccentric exercise causes “Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness” (DOMS). DOMS include muscle pain that appears 24 to 72 hours after exercise, but also stiffness, edema and muscle proteins release in plasma as a hallmark of muscle fibers injuries. The only systematic intervention that brings a muscle protection against DOMS is to realize submaximal eccentric contractions with a progressively increased intensity. The mechanism of this protection, called the “Repeated Bout Effect” (RBE), is not understood. However, it is likely explained by cellular, mechanical and neural theories [Scand.J.Med.&Sci.Sports, 13, 88, 2003]. The objective of this study is to better understand which neural signal is released in the muscle synapse and which brings protection by RBE. Male adult mice (C57BL6) were randomly divided into downhill running (DHR), uphill running (UHR) and untrained control (CONT) groups (n=4/group). DHR group is characterized by eccentric contractions of the quadriceps while UHR is concerned by concentric contractions. Running groups performed a warm-up of ten minutes followed by an interval exercise on an inclined treadmill at a velocity of 20cm/s. The latter consisted of running 18 bouts of 5 minutes interspersed with a 2 minutes rest. Lumbar spinal cord was dissected 24h after the race. Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins were separately extracted and subjected to a 2D-DIGE analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. We do not observe any cytoplasmic protein modification while in the nuclear extract, seven spots were more abundant in eccentric group and four in concentric group in comparison with control group. The mass spectrometry of these proteins reveals that they are implicated in axoplasmic transport. At 24 hours, too few proteins modifications were detected in lumbar spinal cord, maybe as a consequence of a too short period between race and euthanasia. Implication of axoplasmic transport comforts our starting hypothesis that nervous system is able to protect muscle during the RBE by a synthesis and then a synaptic release of molecules modifying the muscle physiology. [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic study of lumbar spinal cord after quadricipital eccentric exercise
Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Hody, Stéphanie ULg et al

in 17th EURON PhD meeting (2013, September)

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See detailThe susceptibility of the knee extensors to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage is not affected by leg dominance but by exercise order .
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Clinical Physiology & Functional Imaging (2013), 33(5), 373-380

The aims of this study were first to compare the response of dominant and non-dominant legs to eccentric exercise and second, to examine whether there is an effect of exercise order on the magnitude of ... [more ▼]

The aims of this study were first to compare the response of dominant and non-dominant legs to eccentric exercise and second, to examine whether there is an effect of exercise order on the magnitude of symptoms associated with intense eccentric protocols. Eighteen young men performed 3 sets of 30 maximal eccentric isokinetic (60°.sec-1) contractions of the knee extensors (range of motion, ROM: 0°-100°, 0=full extension) using either dominant or nondominant leg. They repeated a similar eccentric bout using the contralateral leg six weeks later. The sequence of leg’s use was allocated to create equally balanced groups. Four indirect markers of muscle damage including subjective pain intensity, maximal isometric strength, muscle stiffness and plasma CK activity were measured before and 24 hours after exercise. All markers changed significantly following the eccentric bout performed either by dominant or non-dominant legs but no significant difference was observed between legs. Interestingly, the comparison between the first and second eccentric bouts revealed that muscle soreness (-42%, p<0.001), CK activity (-62%, p<0.05) and strength loss (-54%, p<0.01) were significantly lower after the second bout. This study suggests that leg dominance does not influence the magnitude of exercise-induced muscle damage and supports for the first time the existence of a contralateral protection against exercise-induced muscle damage in the lower limbs. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of eccentrically and concentrically biased training on mouse muscle phenotype
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise (2013), 45(8), 1460-1468

Introduction: The molecular adaptations specifically induced by different muscle contraction types have only been partially elucidated. We previously demonstrated that eccentric contractions in human ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The molecular adaptations specifically induced by different muscle contraction types have only been partially elucidated. We previously demonstrated that eccentric contractions in human quadriceps elicited proteome modifications that suggest a muscle fiber typology adaptation. We address this question in a more systematic way by examining here the effects of different running modes on the mouse muscle proteome and the muscle fiber typology. Methods: Male adult mice (C57BL6) were randomly divided into downhill running (DHR, quadricipital eccentrically biased contractions), uphill running (UHR, quadricipital concentrically biased contractions) and untrained control (CONT) groups. Running groups performed five training sessions on an inclined treadmill for 75 to 135 min/day and the quadriceps muscles were dissected 96hours after the last session. Muscle protein extracts of DHR and UHR groups (n=4/group) were subjected to a 2D-DIGE analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. The assessment of fiber type, size and number was performed on the rectus femoris of the three groups (n=6/group) using myosin heavy chain (MHC) immunohistochemistry. Results: In the proteomic analysis, eight spots identified as the fast MHC isoforms exhibited a lower abundance in DHR compared to UHR (p<0.05, t-test). In contrast, ATP synthase subunit α and tubulin β were more expressed in DHR (p<0.05). A significant higher proportion of type I and IIa fibers was found for DHR compared to UHR or CONT groups (p<0.05, one-way ANOVA). Conclusions: Our data suggest that the eccentrically biased contractions in mice induced specific adaptations in protein expression and muscle fiber composition which may reflect a more oxidative muscle phenotype. The differences in stress placed on the muscle between both trainings may be responsible for some unique adaptations resulting from the eccentrically biased training. [less ▲]

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See detailMuscle fatigue experienced during maximal eccentric exercise is predictive of the plasma creatine kinase (CK) response
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports (2013), 23(4), 501-7

Unaccustomed eccentric exercise may cause skeletal muscle damage with an increase in plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. Although the wide variability among individuals in CK response to standardized ... [more ▼]

Unaccustomed eccentric exercise may cause skeletal muscle damage with an increase in plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. Although the wide variability among individuals in CK response to standardized lengthening contractions has been well described, the reasons underlying this phenomenon have not yet been understood. Therefore, this study investigated a possible correlation of the changes in muscle damage indirect markers after an eccentric exercise with the decline in muscle performance during the exercise. Twenty-seven healthy untrained male subjects performed three sets of 30 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the knee extensors. The muscular work was recorded using an isokinetic dynamometer to assess muscle fatigue by means of various fatigue indices. Plasma CK activity, muscle soreness, and stiffness were measured before (pre) and one day after (post) exercise. The eccentric exercise bout induced significant changes of the three muscle damage indirect markers. Large intersubject variability was observed for all criteria measured. More interestingly, the log (CKpost/CKpre) and muscle stiffness appeared to be closely correlated with the relative work decrease (r = 0.84, r2 = 0.70 and r = 0.75, r2 = 0.56, respectively). This is the first study to propose that the muscle fatigue profile during maximal eccentric protocol could predict the magnitude of the symptoms associated with muscle damage in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of eccentric versus concentric training on mouse muscle phenotype
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Abstract Book of 10th Meeting of Belgian Society for Neuroscience (2013, May)

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See detailPrévention des courbatures musculaires en pratique sportive
Hody, Stéphanie ULg

Conference (2013, March 07)

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See detailPrévention des courbatures musculaires en pratique sportive
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Delvaux, François; Rodriguez de la Cruz, Carlos ULg et al

in Prévention des lésions musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

L’exercice excentrique, lorsqu’il est réalisé de manière intense et/ou inhabituelle, est réputé être à l’origine de diverses sensations de courbatures d’apparition retardée. Ces douleurs musculaires ... [more ▼]

L’exercice excentrique, lorsqu’il est réalisé de manière intense et/ou inhabituelle, est réputé être à l’origine de diverses sensations de courbatures d’apparition retardée. Ces douleurs musculaires, appelées DOMS pour Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness, s’accompagnent de déficits structuro-fonctionnels pouvant persister pendant plusieurs jours. Bien qu’il disparaisse spontanément après quelques jours de récupération, le phénomène des DOMS reste problématique chez le sportif en raison des conséquences néfastes associées : perturbation de l’entraînement sportif, diminution de la performance athlétique et majoration du risque de lésions véritables en cas de poursuite d’activités sportives. Il apparaît donc essentiel, pour un sportif soumis à un entraînement excentrique, d’échapper aux DOMS. La mise au point d’approches susceptibles de réduire les conséquences néfastes des DOMS a constitué un objectif prioritaire de nombreuses études. Ainsi, les premiers essais ont été basés sur des stratégies nutritionnelles ou pharmacologiques ainsi que sur des procédés cliniques. Bien que certains procédés tels que le massage ou les apports nutritionnels puissent influencer de manière positive l’un ou l’autre symptôme, ceux-ci ne semblent pas capables d’agir sur le phénomène des DOMS dans sa globalité. Actuellement, la seule démarche préventive réellement efficace reste la réalisation d’un entraînement excentrique à intensité sous-maximale progressivement intensifiées. [less ▲]

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See detailLe travail excentrique : aspects musculaires et tendineux
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg et al

in Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

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See detailApplication pratique du concept de charge de travail au sein d'un club de football professionnel
Rodriguez de la Cruz, Carlos ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Vervier, J. et al

in Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

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See detailProteomic comparison of high and low responders to eccentric exercise
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Meeusen, R.; Duchateau, J.; Roelands, B. (Eds.) et al Book of Abstracts of the 17th annual Congress of the ECSS (2012, July)

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See detailMuscle fatigue experienced during maximal eccentric exercise is predictive of the plasma creatine kinase (CK) response
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Meeusen, R.; Duchateau, J.; Roelands, B. (Eds.) et al Book of Abstracts of the 17th annual Congress of the ECSS (2012, July)

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See detailEtude des mécanismes cellulaires et moléculaires à l'origine du phénomène des DOMS (Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness) consécutif à l'exercice excentrique.
Hody, Stéphanie ULg

Doctoral thesis (2012)

Tous, nous avons déjà ressenti diverses sensations de courbatures après avoir réalisé un exercice musculaire intense et/ou inhabituel. Ces douleurs musculaires d’apparition retardée et d’intensité ... [more ▼]

Tous, nous avons déjà ressenti diverses sensations de courbatures après avoir réalisé un exercice musculaire intense et/ou inhabituel. Ces douleurs musculaires d’apparition retardée et d’intensité variable sont désignées scientifiquement par l’acronyme « DOMS » pour « Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness ». Le rôle particulier du mode de contraction excentrique dans la survenue des DOMS est largement accepté. Rappelons que l’exercice excentrique est caractérisé par l’association paradoxale des phénomènes opposés d’allongement musculo-tendineux et de développement tensionnel. Dès lors, les contraintes mécaniques accompagnant les contractions excentriques peuvent entraîner diverses altérations de l’ultrastructure musculaire qui se manifestent par une série de symptômes cliniques rendant les DOMS invalidants sur le plan fonctionnel. Or, le caractère discriminant de l’évaluation excentrique et l’efficacité rééducative de l’exercice excentrique dans plusieurs types de pathologies de l’appareil locomoteur ont formellement été démontrées. Dans ces conditions et bien qu’elles disparaissent spontanément après quelques jours de récupération, les DOMS retardent fréquemment la mise en route de programmes de réadaptation ou d’entraînement sportif. Actuellement, à l’analyse de la littérature, on ne peut que constater l’absence de solution thérapeutique susceptible d’atténuer significativement l’intensité des DOMS et de leurs conséquences fonctionnelles associées. Paradoxalement, l’exercice excentrique lui-même, lorsqu’il est proposé en conditions sous-maximales progressivement intensifiées, semble constituer la seule prévention réellement efficace, capable de prévenir l’apparition des DOMS. Malgré la littérature abondante consacrée à la description du phénomène des DOMS, aucune théorie unifiée n’est actuellement disponible pour expliquer la survenue différée des sensations douloureuses et les signes associés. L’efficacité d’un entraînement spécifique dans la prévention des DOMS a été confirmée par de nombreux travaux mais la nature de cet effet protecteur reste sujette à conjectures. Ce travail vise à une meilleure connaissance des mécanismes cellulaires et moléculaires impliqués dans le phénomène des DOMS survenant après la réalisation d’un exercice excentrique. Au cours de ce travail, nous avons donc tenté de contribuer à répondre aux questions suivantes : (1) Quels sont les corrélats biochimiques correspondants à l’apparition des DOMS suite à l’exécution d’exercices excentriques ? (2) Quels sont les mécanismes responsables de la variabilité interindividuelle des réponses à l’exercice excentrique ? (3) Quelles sont les adaptations induites par l’entraînement excentrique permettant de prévenir l’apparition des DOMS ? L’originalité de notre travail réside dans la mise au point d’un protocole expérimental chez l’humain associant la provocation de DOMS au moyen d’un dynamomètre isocinétique, le prélèvement de tissus musculaires humains par biopsie à l’aiguille et l’analyse protéomique comparative de ceux-ci par la méthode du 2D-DIGE. Nos travaux suggèrent qu’une plus grande sensibilité aux microlésions induites par l’exercice excentrique s’expliquerait par une prédominance de fibres rapides de type glycolytique et qu’un entraînement excentrique visant à prévenir les DOMS induirait une transition des fibres rapides de type glycolytique vers des fibres plus oxydatives. Le modèle humain, utilisé dans ce travail, nous a également permis de définir des indices de fatigue permettant de prédire l’ampleur de la réponse de la CK et de suggérer l’existence d’un effet protecteur controlatéral. Toutefois, les limites de l’expérimentation humaine ne nous permettent pas d’envisager une « manipulation » du système expérimental. Si on veut dépasser le stade expérimental d’observation encore possible chez l’humain et aborder le stade de stimulation et/ou d’invalidation par exemple, le recours à un modèle animal s’impose de lui-même. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman muscle proteome modifications after acute or repeated eccentric exercises
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg; Sergeant, K. et al

in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise (2011), 43(12), 2281-2296

INTRODUCTION:: DOMS (Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness), a condition triggered by eccentric exercise, affects muscle cells at a biochemical level in a poorly understood fashion. The objective of the present ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION:: DOMS (Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness), a condition triggered by eccentric exercise, affects muscle cells at a biochemical level in a poorly understood fashion. The objective of the present study was to examine human muscle proteome modifications induced by strenuous eccentric exercises following a specific training aimed to prevent DOMS. METHODS:: Biopsy of the rectus femoris were taken from healthy human volunteers in three successive conditions: (1) at rest, (2) 24 hours after an injuring exercise protocol consisting of 3 series of 30 maximal contractions of the quadriceps on an isokinetic dynamometer, (3) 24 hours after a similar exercise bout preceded either by 5 eccentric training sessions, or no training. RESULTS:: Muscle damage was assessed before and 1 day after each maximal eccentric test by comparing three indirect markers: plasma activity of creatine kinase (CK), muscle stiffness and subjective pain intensity. Compared to the first eccentric test, those markers were reduced after the second test and further reduced if this second test followed the eccentric training, thus confirming the protective effect of such training. Muscle protein extracts were subjected to a 2D-DIGE proteomic analysis coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS protein identification. Surprisingly, we observed that myosin heavy chains decreased after the first eccentric test, and were reduced further with other contractile proteins after the second test. Furthermore, the expression of several glycolytic enzymes decreased only after the second test that was preceded by a specific training. CONCLUSION:: These findings suggest that the eccentric training resulted in a switch to oxidative metabolism, which may be associated with protection from DOMS. [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic comparison of High and Low responders to eccentric exercise
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Abstract book du Colloque de la Société Belge des Neurosciences (2009, May)

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