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See detailProstatic androgen repressed message-1 (PARM-1) may play a role in prostatic cell immortalisation.
Cornet, Anne ULg; Hanon, Emmanuel; Reiter, Eric R et al

in Prostate (The) (2003), 56(3), 220-30

BACKGROUND: Prostatic androgen-repressed message-1 (PARM-1) has been cloned from the prostate. The transcript of the PARM-1 gene is overexpressed during regression of the prostate after androgen ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Prostatic androgen-repressed message-1 (PARM-1) has been cloned from the prostate. The transcript of the PARM-1 gene is overexpressed during regression of the prostate after androgen withdrawal. The regulation of PARM-1 by androgens is limited to this organ. We have studied the effects of PARM-1 overexpression in malignant prostate cells. METHODS: The PARM-1 cDNA was introduced into the rat cancer cell line MAT LyLu along with a doxycycline-dependent regulator. RESULTS: Maximal expression of PARM-1 (fivefold induction) was achieved by incubating the cells with 2 microM doxycycline for 48 hr. A study investigating the effect of PARM-1 overexpression on the transcription of 588 genes has shown that the TLP1 gene (encoding rat telomerase protein component 1) was the most up-regulated (fourfold). In addition, a dose-dependent increase in telomerase activity was observed in cells overexpressing PARM-1. In vivo, the androgen-deprived prostate showed an increased TLP1 level and increased telomerase activity. CONCLUSIONS: Increased telomerase activity is often associated with the immortalisation of cancer cell lines, particularly prostatic ones. This could mean that PARM-1 is involved, via increased telomerase activity, in a survival program enabling certain prostatic cells to resist apoptosis, thus conferring a selective advantage to pre-cancerous or cancerous cells. [less ▲]

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See detailPlacental GH, IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-1 and leptin during a glucose challenge test in pregnant women : relation with maternal body weight, glucose tolerance, and birth weight
Verhaeghe, J.; Pintiaux, Axelle ULg; Van Herck, E. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2002), 87(6), 2875-2882

The prediction of birth weight may be improved by the measurement of hormones or growth factors in the mother. We measured body weight (BW) and plasma levels of placental GH (PGH), IGF-I, IGF-binding ... [more ▼]

The prediction of birth weight may be improved by the measurement of hormones or growth factors in the mother. We measured body weight (BW) and plasma levels of placental GH (PGH), IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), and leptin at the time of the glucose challenge test (GCT) in 289 women, who were pregnant with a single fetus, between 24 and 29 wk gestational age (GA). Delivery occurred 12 +/- 2 (mean +/- SD) wk later. First, we examined which variables regulate these hormonal factors. Multiple regression showed that PGH concentrations were determined by GA at sampling and were negatively related to BW. IGF-I levels were mainly determined by PGH, and also by insulin, BW, and (negatively) age. IGFBP-1 concentrations were negatively determined by BW, insulin, and IGF-I. BW was also a powerful determinant of leptin levels, with insulin as a less robust determinant. Second, we examined the relation to glucose levels. PGH, IGF-I, and IGFBP-1 concentrations were not correlated with post-GCT glucose levels and were comparable in women with a normal or disturbed GCT (glucose >/=7.8 mmol/liter; n = 72). Finally, we examined the relation with birth weight and placental weight. Birth weight, corrected for GA and stratified into percentile groups, and the ponderal index at birth were strongly related to maternal BW, but not to maternal PGH, IGF-I, or IGFBP-1 levels. Neither was maternal leptin related to birth weight, but leptin concentrations were slightly higher in women who delivered obese babies. Placental weight was not related to any of the hormonal factors. This prospective study indicates that the variation in circulating PGH, IGF-I, IGFBP-1, and leptin between 24 and 29 wk of pregnancy is strongly dependent on maternal BW, but is unrelated to glucose tolerance. In addition, the measurement of PGH, IGF-I, IGFBP-1, or leptin at the time of the GCT is not useful clinically to predict birth weight. [less ▲]

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See detailPlacental growth hormone (GH), GH-binding protein, and insulin-like growth factor axis in normal, growth-retarded, and diabetic pregnancies: Correlations with fetal growth
McIntyre, H. D.; Serek, R.; Crane, D. I. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2000), 85(3), 1143-1150

We previously described significant changes in GH-binding protein (GHBP) in pathological human pregnancy. There was a substantial elevation of GHBP in cases of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and a ... [more ▼]

We previously described significant changes in GH-binding protein (GHBP) in pathological human pregnancy. There was a substantial elevation of GHBP in cases of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and a reduction in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. GHBP has the potential to modulate the proportion of free placental GH (PGH) and hence the impact on the maternal GH/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis, fetal growth, and maternal glycemic status. The present study was undertaken to investigate the relationship among glycemia, GHBP, and PGH during pregnancy and to assess the impact of GHBP on the concentration of free PGH. We have extended the analysis of specimens to include measurements of GHBP, PGH, IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), IGFSP-2, and IGFBP-3 and have related these to maternal characteristics, fetal growth, and glycemia. The simultaneous measurement of GHBP and PGH has for the first time allowed calculation of the free component of PGH and correlation of the free component to indexes of fetal growth and other endocrine markers. PGH, free PGH, IGF-I, and IGF-II were substantially decreased in IUGR at 28-30 weeks gestation (K28) and 36-38 weeks gestation (K36). The mean concentration (+/-SEM) of total PGH increased significantly from K28 to K36 (30.0 +/- 2.2 to 50.7 +/- 6.2 ng/mL; n = 40), as did the concentration of free PGH (23.4 +/- 2.3 to 43.7 +/- 6.0 ng/mL; n = 38). The mean percentage of free PGH was significantly less in IUGR than in normal subjects (67% vs. 79%; P < 0.01). Macrosomia was associated with an increase in these parameters that did not reach statistical significance. Multiple regression analysis revealed that PGH/IGF-I and IGFBP-5 account for 40% of the variance in birth weight. IGFBP-3 showed a significant correlation with IGF-I, IGF-II, and free and total PGK at K28 and K36. Noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients had a lower mean percentage of free PGH (65%; P < 0.01), and insulin-dependent diabetics had a higher mean percentage of free PGH (87%; P < 0.01) than normal subjects. Mean postprandial glucose at K28 correlated positively with PGH and free PGH (consistent with the hyperglycemic action of GH). GHBP correlated negatively with both postprandial and fasting glucose. Although GHBP correlated negatively with PGH (r = -0.52; P <.001), free PGH and total PGH correlated very closely (r = 0.98). The results are consistent with an inhibitory function for GHBP in vivo and support a critical role for placental GH and IGF-I in driving normal fetal growth. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel messenger ribonucleic acid homologous to human MAGE-D is strongly expressed in rat Sertoli cells and weakly in Leydig cells and is regulated by follitropin, lutropin, and prolactin.
Hennuy, Benoît ULg; Reiter, E.; Cornet, Anne ULg et al

in Endocrinology (2000), 141(10), 3821-31

We have cloned a novel complementary DNA whose expression was decreased in rat Sertoli cell cultures after treatment with FSH. This complementary DNA encodes a protein of 570 amino acids and shares 92 ... [more ▼]

We have cloned a novel complementary DNA whose expression was decreased in rat Sertoli cell cultures after treatment with FSH. This complementary DNA encodes a protein of 570 amino acids and shares 92% homology with the human MAGE-D protein. In contrast to other MAGE genes (A, B, or C), we have shown that MAGE-D expression was ubiquitous in healthy rat tissues. In the seminiferous tubules, the MAGE-D was expressed in Sertoli cells but not in germ cells as demonstrated by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, whereas for the other MAGE genes, expression has been shown to be restricted to germ cells. Interestingly, MAGE-D was also detected for the first time in the female gonad by Northern blotting. In MLTC-1 cells (mouse Leydig tumor cell line-1), LH and PRL stimulated MAGE-D expression. Using hypophysectomized rats, it was confirmed that FSH decreased MAGE-D expression, whereas LH and PRL increased MAGE-D messenger RNA level in the whole testis most probably through a direct action on Leydig cells. As MAGE-D is present in both the seminiferous compartment and interstitium and hormonally regulated in each, it is possible that it has specific functions in each compartment during the development and the maintenance of the testis. [less ▲]

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See detailPlacental growth hormone and IGF-I in a pregnant woman with Pit-1 deficiency
Verhaeghe, J.; Bougoussa, M.; Van Herck, E. et al

in Clinical Endocrinology (2000), 53(5), 645-647

The respective contributions of pituitary and placental GH to circulating IGF-I in pregnant women have not been well established. We measured the serum concentrations of placental growth hormone (PGH) and ... [more ▼]

The respective contributions of pituitary and placental GH to circulating IGF-I in pregnant women have not been well established. We measured the serum concentrations of placental growth hormone (PGH) and IGF-I in a woman with pit-1 deficiency before, during and after pregnancy, resulting in the birth of a healthy child (not pit-1 deficient). Both PGH and IGF-I concentrations were below the assay detection limit before and after pregnancy. During pregnancy, PGH and IGF-I levels increased steadily; the concentrations of PGH and IGF-I in late pregnancy were comparable with levels previously measured in normal pregnancies. PGH and IGF-I concentrations were strongly correlated throughout pregnancy (r = 0.90; P = 0.002). PGH was undetectable in cord serum, whilst the IGF-I concentration was within the normal range. The findings of this case study corroborate the notion that PGH is the prime regulator of maternal serum IGF-I during pregnancy. [less ▲]

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See detailLymphoid cell apoptosis induced by trophoblastic cells: a model of active foeto-placental tolerance
Coumans, Bernard ULg; Thellin, Olivier ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg et al

in Journal of Immunological Methods (1999), 224(1-2), 185-196

To test the hypothesis that CD95-L (Fas-L) present on trophoblastic cells plays a part in establishing foeto-placental tolerance by inducing apoptosis of immune defence cells, we cocultured trophoblasts ... [more ▼]

To test the hypothesis that CD95-L (Fas-L) present on trophoblastic cells plays a part in establishing foeto-placental tolerance by inducing apoptosis of immune defence cells, we cocultured trophoblasts with lymphoid cells and scored the frequency of cell death in these cultures. We prepared human trophoblastic cells from term placentas removed by C-section and placed them in culture for 48 h before introducing the lymphoid cells. We added Jurkat cells, a CD3 + lymphoid cell line, or purified T cells from human blood to the cultured trophoblasts and monitored apoptosis by electron microscopy and flow cytometry after TUNEL or annexin V labelling. The frequency of cell death in the CD3 + cell population was higher when the lymphoid cells were cocultured with trophoblastic cells than when they were cultured alone. This frequency increased with time but was reduced when anti-CD95-L antibodies were added to the culture medium. Cell death was less frequent in the lymphoid cell population when trophoblasts were replaced with human fibroblasts not expressing CD95-L. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel gene overexpressed in the prostate of castrated rats: hormonal regulation, relationship to apoptosis and to acquired prostatic cell androgen independence.
Bruyninx, M.; Hennuy, Benoît ULg; Cornet, Anne ULg et al

in Endocrinology (1999), 140(10), 4789-99

We have identified a novel complementary DNA (cDNA) corresponding to a gene overexpressed in the rat ventral prostate after castration. This cDNA displays 89.4% identity with 453 bp of a mouse EST and 81 ... [more ▼]

We have identified a novel complementary DNA (cDNA) corresponding to a gene overexpressed in the rat ventral prostate after castration. This cDNA displays 89.4% identity with 453 bp of a mouse EST and 81.5% identity with 157 bp of a human EST and was named PARM-1 for prostatic androgen-repressed message-1. The complete cDNA is 1187 bp long and codes for a protein of 298 amino acids that contains four potential glycosylation sites and three half cystinyl residues. The PARM-1 gene was found to be expressed at quite low levels in most rat tissues including those of the urogenital tract. The kinetic of induction of PARM-1 gene in the prostate was highly correlated to the development of apoptosis in the whole organ. Supplementation of castrated animals with androgens reversed both the process of apoptosis and the overexpression of PARM-1 gene. Supplementation with estrogens did not result in an increase in the PARM-1 messenger RNA levels when compared with the castration alone. However, the treatment resulted in a more rapid return to intact levels in the castrated plus estrogen group. When apoptosis of testis and prostate was induced in vivo by hypophysectomy, it was found that PARM-1 was only overexpressed in the prostate. Therefore, PARM-1 seems to be regulated by androgens only in the prostate. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistological techniques, we have shown that PARM-1 gene product is found exclusively in the epithelial cells of involuting prostate. Analysis by flow cytometry of MAT LyLu epithelial cells transiently expressing PARM-1 protein did not allow us to demonstrate a direct effect of PARM-1 gene overexpression on the programmed death of the transfected cells. Treatment of MAT LyLu cells by transforming growth factor-beta induced apoptosis but had no effect on PARM-1 production. However PARM-1 protein has been detected by Western blotting in various cell lines such as MAT LyLu, MAT Lu, and PIF, which are androgen independent. This would suggest that PARM-1 gene product would be a marker for acquired androgen-independence of these tumor cells. [less ▲]

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See detailHousekeeping Genes as Internal Standards: Use and Limits
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg et al

in Journal of Biotechnology (1999), 75(2-3), 291-5

Quantitative studies are commonly realised in the biomedical research to compare RNA expression in different experimental or clinical conditions. These quantifications are performed through their ... [more ▼]

Quantitative studies are commonly realised in the biomedical research to compare RNA expression in different experimental or clinical conditions. These quantifications are performed through their comparison to the expression of the housekeeping gene transcripts like glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), albumin, actins, tubulins, cyclophilin, hypoxantine phsophoribosyltransferase (HRPT), L32. 28S, and 18S rRNAs are also used as internal standards. In this paper, it is recalled that the commonly used internal standards can quantitatively vary in response to various factors. Possible variations are illustrated using three experimental examples. Preferred types of internal standards are then proposed for each of these samples and thereafter the general procedure concerning the choice of an internal standard and the way to manage its uses are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailGènes impliqués dans l'apoptose prostatique provoquée par un déficit androgénique
Bruyninx, Marc; Cornet, Anne ULg; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in Medecine Sciences : M/S (1998), 14(5), 572-579

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See detailExpression of Growth Hormone Receptors by Lymphocyte Subpopulations in the Human Tonsil
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg et al

in Developmental Immunology (1998), 6(3-4), 295-304

The ability of human tonsillar lymphoid cells to express growth hormone receptor (hGH-N-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. FITC-coupled recombinant human growth hormone (hGH-N) was used to reveal the ... [more ▼]

The ability of human tonsillar lymphoid cells to express growth hormone receptor (hGH-N-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. FITC-coupled recombinant human growth hormone (hGH-N) was used to reveal the receptors, in combination with phenotype markers. Unlike T cells, tonsillar B cells constitutively express the hGH-N receptor. Quiescent cells separated from activated cells by Percoll-gradient centrifugation bear fewer receptors than activated ones. Activated T cells express hGH-N-R, but the typical germinal centre CD4+ CD57+ T cells do not. These latter thus appear not to be fully activated. Inside the lymph follicles, the germinal centre CD38+ B-cell population and the mantle-zone CD39+ B-cell population display similar levels of hGH-N-R expression, but receptor density is lower on dividing dark-zone CD38+ CD10+ B cells. Different lymphoid-cell populations thus differ markedly in their ability to express the growth hormone receptor, in relation notably to their activation status. This highlights the link between the neuroendocrine system and the active immune defense. [less ▲]

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See detailSurgical management of amiodarone-associated thyrotoxicosis: too risky or too effective?
Hamoir, Etienne ULg; Meurisse, Michel ULg; Defechereux, Thierry ULg et al

in World Journal of Surgery (1998), 22(6), 537-42542-3

Amiodarone-associated thyrotoxicosis, often clinically mild and resolutive after amiodarone discontinuation or under medical therapy, is sometimes drug unresponsive and not uncommonly follows a dramatic ... [more ▼]

Amiodarone-associated thyrotoxicosis, often clinically mild and resolutive after amiodarone discontinuation or under medical therapy, is sometimes drug unresponsive and not uncommonly follows a dramatic, even fatal course. Therefore, we considered a surgical solution in 15 severely amiodarone-associated thyrotoxic patients. Twelve men and three women (mean age 68 years, range 50-84 years) underwent radical thyroidectomy for clinical and biologically proved amiodarone-associated thyrotoxicosis. In six surgery was the first-line therapeutic option. In the other nine thyroidectomy seemed unavoidable considering the unresponsiveness to medical therapy and rapid deterioration of the patients' clinical condition, with life-threatening cardiac failure in three. In every patient surgery was conducted without immediate or delayed complications. Total thyroidectomy proved uniformly, definitively, and rapidly effective in controlling thyrotoxicosis in all patients, with a spectacular reversal of cardiac failure in the three most critical cases. Surgery was beneficial to our 15 patients and undoubtedly life-saving in the three most worrying cases. These results suggest that thyroidectomy should be more liberally regarded as an interesting alternative to conventional, but unpredictably effective, medical therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailDemonstration of the expression of CD95 ligand transcript and protein in human placenta
Zorzi, Willy ULg; Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg et al

in Placenta (1998), 19(4), 269-277

Tolerance of the fetal allograft enables the human conceptus to implant itself into the maternal uterus and survive and grow there. This tolerance phenomenon remains largely obscure, notably because it ... [more ▼]

Tolerance of the fetal allograft enables the human conceptus to implant itself into the maternal uterus and survive and grow there. This tolerance phenomenon remains largely obscure, notably because it appears to be controlled by multiple mechanisms. CD95 ligand (CD95-L), which can trigger death of CD95-positive cells by apoptosis, may participate in inducing anti-fetus-sensitized CD95-positive T lymphocytes to enter apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry (first trimester and term placentae), FAGS assays (term placenta) and RT-PCR assays (term placenta), the presence of CD95-L protein and mRNA has been shown in crude placental tissue preparations and isolated placental cells. Among the latter, CD95-L expression was detected in trophoblastic cells, fetal blood cells (mRNA only) and also the Hofbauer macrophages. No CD95-L was detected in fibroblasts or fetal endothelial cells. Thus trophoblastic cells, Hofbauer macrophages, and perhaps also fetal blood cells could form a sequential barrier blocking maternal activated defence cells bearing CD95 molecules. (C) 1998 W. B. Saunders Company Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailBoth Pituitary and Placental Growth Hormone Transcripts Are Expressed in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (Pbmc)
Melen-Lamalle, Laurence ULg; Hennen, Georges ULg; Dullaart, R. P. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Immunology (1997), 110(2), 336-40

The hGH-V gene codes for a variant of human pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) named placental growth hormone (hPGH). hPGH shares 93% amino acid identity with hGH-N. Until now the hGH-V gene was considered ... [more ▼]

The hGH-V gene codes for a variant of human pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) named placental growth hormone (hPGH). hPGH shares 93% amino acid identity with hGH-N. Until now the hGH-V gene was considered to be exclusively expressed in human placenta, where it replaces maternal circulating hGH-N at the end of pregnancy. In this study we investigated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis hGH-N, and hGH-V, gene expression in PBMC in men, women and pregnant women. We have demonstrated that hGH-N and hGH-V transcripts are simultaneously produced by PBMC in both men and women as well as pregnant women. The PBMC of a PIT-1-negative woman expressed only the hGH-V transcript, but not the hGH-N one as expected. In conclusion, hGH-V mRNA is expressed by cells other than the syncytiotrophoblast, is not regulated by PIT-1, and may be involved in immune regulation, as is pituitary GH. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of somatostatin receptor SST4 in human placenta and absence of octreotide effect on human placental growth hormone concentration during pregnancy.
Caron, Philippe; Buscail, Louis; Beckers, Albert ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1997), 82(11), 3771-3776

In pregnancy, the human placenta GH acts as a growth-promoting hormone and appears to be the main stimulator of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) secretion. In a woman with a TSH-secreting macroadenoma ... [more ▼]

In pregnancy, the human placenta GH acts as a growth-promoting hormone and appears to be the main stimulator of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) secretion. In a woman with a TSH-secreting macroadenoma, successful treatment with the somatostatin analog octreotide was conducted during the first month and the second half of pregnancy without side-effects on placental and fetal development. As observed in normal pregnancy, both serum placental GH and IGF-I levels increased throughout pregnancy and dropped sharply after delivery. In placental membranes from both treated and healthy untreated patients, we demonstrated the presence of high affinity binding sites for somatostatin-14 (Kd, 4.6 and 5.3 nmol/L; binding capacity, 1.53 and 1.35 pmol/mg protein, respectively). These receptors displayed low affinity for octreotide (IC50, 1.2-2 mumol/L), suggesting the presence of SST1 and/or SST4 receptors. We found that messenger ribonucleic acids of these two subtypes were expressed in both human placental tissue and purified human cytotrophoblast cells. Finally, the SST1-selective analog, des-AA1,2,5[D-Trp8,IAmp9]S-14 had low affinity for placental somatostatin receptors. These results argue in favor of the presence of the SST4 subtype in human placenta. At the doses administered, octreotide did not bind to placental somatostatin receptors. Our results may explain the absence of changes in both human placental GH and IGF-I concentrations that we observed during octreotide treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailLuteinizing hormone increases the abundance of various transcripts, independently of the androgens, in the rat prostate.
Reiter, E.; Poncin, Joseph ULg; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (1997), 233(1), 108-12

Differential display analysis was carried out to find, in the rat prostate, genes that could be regulated by Luteinizing Hormone (LH), independently of the androgens. Hypophysectomized and castrated adult ... [more ▼]

Differential display analysis was carried out to find, in the rat prostate, genes that could be regulated by Luteinizing Hormone (LH), independently of the androgens. Hypophysectomized and castrated adult rats were treated with either LH, testosterone or saline. Regulated discrete bands have been eluted and reamplified. After Northern blotting, the levels of mRNA corresponding to 8 PCR fragments were significantly increased by LH treatment. None of these inserts were found to be induced by testosterone. One insert was subcloned, sequenced and identified as the ribosomial protein S 23. A competitive RT-PCR assay was carried out on the full length S 23 cDNA and confirmed that its mRNA levels were stimulated by LH but not by testosterone. These results strongly suggest that the LH membrane receptor, previously shown to be expressed in the rat prostate, has a physiological significance in this organ. Moreover, it appears that the effect of LH on the rat prostate are independent of the androgens. [less ▲]

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See detailAbsence d'effet de l'octréotide sur les concentrations plasmatiques de l'hormone de croissance placentaire
Caron, P.; Igout, A.; Hennen, Georges ULg et al

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (1996), 57(4), 335

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See detailPlacental growth hormone secretion is not influenced in vivo by octreotide therapy
Caron, P.; Igout, A.; Hennen, Georges ULg et al

in 10th international Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1996)

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See detailGrowth hormone secretion during pregnancy in an acromegalic woman
Petrossians, Patrick ULg; Chanson, P.; Schaison, G. et al

in 10th international Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1996)

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See detailL'hyperthyrocalcitoninémie associée aux thyroïdites chroniques autoimmunes. A-t-elle une signification?
Meurisse, M.; Beckers, Albert ULg; Louis, O. et al

in IVe congrès de l'association francophone de chirurgie endocrinienne - Abstract book (1995, June 15)

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