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See detailThe CROSTVOC project – an integrated approach to study the effect of stress on BVOC exchange between agricultural crops and grassland ecosystems and the atmosphere
Amelynck, Crist; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Global changes in atmospheric composition and climate are expected to affect BVOC exchange between terrestrial vegetation and the atmosphere through changes in the drivers of constitutive BVOC emissions ... [more ▼]

Global changes in atmospheric composition and climate are expected to affect BVOC exchange between terrestrial vegetation and the atmosphere through changes in the drivers of constitutive BVOC emissions and by increases in frequency and intensity of biotic or abiotic stress episodes. Indeed, several studies indicate changes in the emission patterns of constitutive BVOCs and emission of stress-induced BVOCs following heat, drought and oxidative stress, amongst others. Relating changes in BVOC emissions to the occurrence of one or multiple stressors in natural environmental conditions is not straightforward and only few field studies have dealt with it, especially for agricultural crop and grassland ecosystems. The CROSTVOC project aims to contribute in filling this knowledge gap in three ways. Firstly, it aims at performing long-term BVOC emission field measurements from maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), two important crop species on the global scale, and from grassland. This should lead to a better characterization of (mainly oxygenated) BVOC emissions from these understudied ecosystems, allowing a better representation of those emissions in air quality and atmospheric chemistry and transport models. BVOC fluxes are obtained by the Disjunct Eddy Covariance by mass scanning (DEC-MS) technique, using a hs-PTR-MS instrument for BVOC analysis. Secondly, the eddy covariance BVOC flux measurements (especially at the grassland site) will be accompanied by ozone flux, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthesis and soil moisture measurements, amongst others, to allow linking alterations in BVOC emissions to stress episodes. Simultaneously, automated dynamic enclosures will be deployed in order to detect specific abiotic and biotic stress markers by PTR-MS and identify them unambiguously by GC-MS. Thirdly, the field measurements will be accompanied by laboratory BVOC flux measurements in an environmental chamber in order to better disentangle the responses of the BVOC emissions to driving factors that co-occur in field conditions and to determine the influence of single abiotic stressors on BVOC emissions. Next to a general presentation, some preliminary results of the project will be shown. [less ▲]

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See detailImproving energy partitioning and the nighttime energy balance by implementation of a multi-layer energy budget in ORCHIDEE-CAN
Chen, Yiying; Ryder, James; Naudts, Kim et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Canopy structure is one of the most important vegetation characteristics for land-atmosphere interactions as it determines the energy and scalar exchanges between land surface and overlay air mass. In ... [more ▼]

Canopy structure is one of the most important vegetation characteristics for land-atmosphere interactions as it determines the energy and scalar exchanges between land surface and overlay air mass. In this study we evaluated the performance of a newly developed multi-layer energy budget (Ryder et al., 2014) in a land surface model, ORCHIDEE-CAN (Naudts et al., 2014), which simulates canopy structure and can be coupled to an atmospheric model using an implicit procedure. Furthermore, a vertical discrete drag parametrization scheme was also incorporated into this model, in order to obtain a better description of the sub-canopy wind profile simulation. Site level datasets, including the top-of-the-canopy and sub-canopy observations made available from eight flux observation sites, were collected in order to conduct this evaluation. The geo-location of the collected observation sites crossed climate zones from temperate to boreal and the vegetation types included deciduous, evergreen broad leaved and evergreen needle leaved forest with maximum LAI ranging from 2.1 to 7.0. First, we used long-term top-of-the-canopy measurements to analyze the performance of the current one-layer energy budget in ORCHIDEE-CAN. Three major processes were identified for improvement through the implementation of a multi-layer energy budget: 1) night time radiation balance, 2) energy partitioning during winter and 3) prediction of the ground heat flux. Short-term sub-canopy observations were used to calibrate the parameters in sub-canopy radiation, turbulence and resistances modules with an automatic tuning process following the maximum gradient of the user-defined objective function. The multi-layer model is able to capture the dynamic of sub-canopy turbulence, temperature and energy fluxes with imposed LAI profile and optimized parameter set at a site level calibration. The simulation result shows the improvement both on the nighttime energy balance and energy partitioning during winter and presents a better Taylor skill score, compared to the result from single layer simulation. The importance of using the multi-layer energy budget in a land surface model for coupling to the atmospheric model will also be discussed in this presentation. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling carbon fluxes of forest and grassland ecosystems in Western Europe using the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model: evaluation against eddy covariance data.
Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; François, Louis ULg; Dury, Marie ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Eddy covariance measurements are an essential resource to understand how ecosystem carbon fluxes react in response to climate change, and to help to evaluate and validate the performance of land surface ... [more ▼]

Eddy covariance measurements are an essential resource to understand how ecosystem carbon fluxes react in response to climate change, and to help to evaluate and validate the performance of land surface and vegetation models at regional and global scale. In the framework of the MASC project (« Modelling and Assessing Surface Change impacts on Belgian and Western European climate »), vegetation dynamics and carbon fluxes of forest and grassland ecosystems simulated by the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model (Dury et al., iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, 4:82-99, 2011) are evaluated and validated by comparison of the model predictions with eddy covariance data. Here carbon fluxes (e.g. net ecosystem exchange (NEE), gross primary productivity (GPP), and ecosystem respiration (RECO)) and evapotranspiration (ET) simulated with the CARAIB model are compared with the fluxes measured at several eddy covariance flux tower sites in Belgium and Western Europe, chosen from the FLUXNET global network (http://fluxnet.ornl.gov/). CARAIB is forced either with surface atmospheric variables derived from the global CRU climatology, or with in situ meteorological data. Several tree (e.g. Pinus sylvestris, Fagus sylvatica, Picea abies) and grass species (e.g. Poaceae, Asteraceae) are simulated, depending on the species encountered on the studied sites. The aim of our work is to assess the model ability to reproduce the daily, seasonal and interannual variablility of carbon fluxes and the carbon dynamics of forest and grassland ecosystems in Belgium and Western Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailBiogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emissions from agricultural crop species: is guttation a possible source for methanol emissions following light/dark transition?
Mozaffar, Ahsan ULg; Amelynck, Crist; Bachy, Aurélie ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17(EGU2015-2110-1),

In the framework of the CROSTVOC (CROp STress VOC) project, the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) between two important agricultural crop species, maize and winter wheat, and the ... [more ▼]

In the framework of the CROSTVOC (CROp STress VOC) project, the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) between two important agricultural crop species, maize and winter wheat, and the atmosphere has recently been measured during an entire growing season by using the eddy covariance technique. Because of the co-variation of BVOC emission drivers in field conditions, laboratory studies were initiated in an environmental chamber in order to disentangle the responses of the emissions to variations of the individual environmental parameters (such as PPFD and temperature) and to diverse abiotic stress factors. Young plants were enclosed in transparent all-Teflon dynamic enclosures (cuvettes) through which BVOC-free and RH-controlled air was sent. BVOC enriched air was subsequently sampled from the plant cuvettes and an empty cuvette (background) and analyzed for BVOCs in a high sensitivity Proton-Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (hs-PTR-MS) and for CO2 in a LI-7000 non-dispersive IR gas analyzer. Emissions were monitored at constant temperature (25 °C) and at a stepwise varying PPFD pattern (0-650 µmol m-2 s-1). For maize plants, sudden light/dark transitions at the end of the photoperiod were accompanied by prompt and considerable increases in methanol (m/z 33) and water vapor (m/z 39) emissions. Moreover, guttation droplets appeared on the sides and the tips of the leaves within a few minutes after light/dark transition. Therefore the assumption has been raised that methanol is also coming out with guttation fluid from the leaves. Consequently, guttation fluid was collected from young maize and wheat plants, injected in an empty enclosure and sampled by PTR-MS. Methanol and a large number of other compounds were observed from guttation fluid. Recent studies have shown that guttation from agricultural crops frequently occurs in field conditions. Further research is required to find out the source strength of methanol emissions by this guttation phenomenon in real environmental conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailHow snow affects air-sea ice CO2 fluxes ?
Delille, Bruno ULg; Kotovitch, Marie ULg; Van Der Linden, Fanny ULg et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailNitrous oxide flux measurement with a closed chamber system : data treatment
Regaert, Donat ULg; Moureaux, Christine ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 30)

Nitrous oxide flux estimation from concentration measurements with a closed chamber system. Statistical data treatment to sort between relevant/irrelevant fluxes.

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See detailAre agricultural ecosystems important BVOC « exchangers »? Evidences from 2 measurement years on croplands at Lonzée (Belgium)
Bachy, Aurélie ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, Niels et al

Poster (2014, July 01)

For the last decades, agricultural ecosystems have been a key biome for diverse socio-economical, environmental and climatic issues. And one of these climatic issues is just BVOC (Biogenic Volatile ... [more ▼]

For the last decades, agricultural ecosystems have been a key biome for diverse socio-economical, environmental and climatic issues. And one of these climatic issues is just BVOC (Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds) emission from terrestrial ecosystems. Indeed, those compounds which are mostly emitted by plants play a great role in the atmospheric chemistry, thereby influencing the Earth surface radiative budget and the tropospheric air quality. However, so far, very few is known about BVOC exchange by crops, implying that huge uncertainties remain about qualifying, quantifying and determining sources/sinks and driving mechanisms of BVOC exchanges between croplands ecosystems and the atmosphere. We present here the first long term BVOC fluxes measurement study conducted on maize (2012) and winter wheat (2013), respectively the second and first most important worldwide crops (FAOSTAT). BVOC exchange was measured using the disjunct by mass scanning eddy covariance technique (+ PTR-MS, Ionicon) at the Lonzée Terrestrial Observatory (ICOS site) in Belgium. Main results are: (i) crops emit mainly methanol; (ii) BVOC fluxes from studied crops is lower than in literature, suggesting that agricultural ecosystems are poor BVOC exchangers; (iii) soil is a significant BVOC source. [less ▲]

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See detailYear Round survey of Ocean-Sea Ice-Air Exchanges – the YROSIAE survey
Delille, Bruno ULg; Haskell, T.; Champenois, Willy ULg et al

Conference (2014, March)

YROSIAE survey aimed to carry out a year-round survey of land-fast sea ice focusing on the study of sea ice physics and biogeochemistry in order to a) better understand and budget exchanges of energy and ... [more ▼]

YROSIAE survey aimed to carry out a year-round survey of land-fast sea ice focusing on the study of sea ice physics and biogeochemistry in order to a) better understand and budget exchanges of energy and matter across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere interfaces during sea ice growth and decay and b) quantify their potential impact on fluxes of climate gases (CO2, DMS, CH4, N2O) to the atmosphere and on carbon and macro- nutrients and micro-nutrients export to the ocean. Ice cores, sea water, brines and exported material were collected at regular intervals about 1 km off cape Evans from November 2011 to December 2011 and from September 2012 to December 2012 in trace-metal clean conditions. Samples are processed to characterize both the vertical distribution and temporal changes of climate gases (CO2, DMS, CH4, N2O), CO2-related parameters (dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity and CaCO3 amount), physical parameters (salinity, temperature, texture, 18O), biogeochemical parameters (macro-nutrients, particulate and dissolved organic carbon, δ13C, δ30Si and δ15N, micro-nutrients - including iron) and biological parameters ( chlorophyll a, primary production within sea ice derived from O2:Ar and O2:N ratios, autotrophic species determination, bacterial cell counts a.s.o.). In addition, we deployed a micro-meterological tower and automatic chambers to measure air-ice CO2 fluxes. Continuous measurements of ice temperature and ice accretion or melting, both at the ice-ocean and the ice-atmosphere interfaces were provided by an “Ice-T” ice mass balance buoy. Sediment traps collected particles below the ice between 10 and 70 m, while dust collectors provided a record of a full suite of trace metal and dust at different levels above the ground. We will present the aims, overall approach and sampling strategy of the YROSIAE survey. In addition we will also discuss CO2 dynamics within the ice and present temporal air-ice CO2 fluxes over the year. We will provide a first budget of air-ice CO2 fluxes during ice growth for Antarctica sea ice and discuss the impact of the snow cover on air-ice CO2 fluxes. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of abiotic stresses on volatile organic compound production of field crops and grasslands
Digrado, Anthony ULg; Mozaffar, Ahsan ULg; Bachy, Aurélie ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

Abiotic and biotic stresses are known to alter biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission from plants. With the climate and global change, BVOC emissions are likely to increase. This increase on ... [more ▼]

Abiotic and biotic stresses are known to alter biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission from plants. With the climate and global change, BVOC emissions are likely to increase. This increase on BVOC emissions could be driven by many environmental parameters like temperature, ozone and light availability for photosynthesis although it is still difficult to predict the impact of some environmental parameters, environmental controls on BVOC emission being species and BVOC-dependent. These BVOC are involved in a wide range of interactions of plants with their environment and these interactions could be affected by the global change. Moreover, BVOC also play a key role in the atmospheric chemistry and may contribute to ozone formation and an increase in methane lifetime, strengthening the global change. Yet, due to technical limitation, there are few studies examining the impact of multiple co-occurring stresses on BVOC emission at the ecosystem level although stress combination is probably more ecologically realistic in field. In the CROSTVOC (for CROp STress VOC) project, the impact of abiotic stresses (e.g. heat, drought, ozone and grazing) on BVOC emission will be investigated for field crops (maize and wheat) and grassland both at the ecosystem and plant scale. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of grazing on carbon dioxide exchanges in an intensively managed Belgian grassland
Jerome, Elisabeth ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg et al

in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment (2014), 194

Given that the soil carbon (C) sequestration potential by grasslands can be used to partly mitigate the total greenhouse gas emissions of livestock production systems, a better understanding of the ... [more ▼]

Given that the soil carbon (C) sequestration potential by grasslands can be used to partly mitigate the total greenhouse gas emissions of livestock production systems, a better understanding of the effects of management practices, and especially grazing, on grassland carbon dioxide (CO2) exchanges has become a major concern. This study aimed at quantifying grazing impact on CO2 fluxes measured by eddy covariance by using innovative data analyses and experiments. For that, we distinguished direct and indirect grazing impact. Indirect impact results from biomass consumption, excretion deposits and soil compaction by cattle that modify CO2 exchanges. Direct impact results from livestock CO2 emissions through respiration that add to total ecosystem respiration. For the indirect impact, the variation during periods with fixed stocking rate of gross primary productivity at light saturation (GPPmax) and normalized dark respiration (Rd,10) was analyzed. On average, GPPmax decreased during grazing periods and increased during non-grazing periods which could be explained by aboveground biomass reduction and re-growth, respectively. In addition, GPPmax variations were negatively correlated to grazing intensity (defined as the product of the stocking rate and the grazing duration). On the contrary, no significant evolution of Rd,10 was found during both grazing and non-grazing periods, probably due to a combination of opposing effects of grazing on the total ecosystem respiration components. The direct impact was emphasized through four specific designed confinement experiments. Each experiment extended over three successive days. On the first and third day, there was no cattle on the plot, while, on the second day, cattle were confined in the main wind direction area of the eddy covariance set-up to increase the stocking rate (≈26livestockunitsha-1). The average livestock CO2 emissions during confinement, FCO2,livestock, were deduced from the differences between half-hourly measurements taken at 24h interval with or without cattle and under similar environmental conditions. They were estimated to be 2.59±0.58kgClivestockunit-1d-1 on average. This result was corroborated by independent estimates based on the C ingested by cattle during confinement. Using an annual average stocking of 2livestockunitsha-1, we found that livestock CO2 emissions represent only 8% of this grassland annual total ecosystem respiration. To our knowledge, this study is the first to quantify both direct and indirect livestock contribution to CO2 fluxes exchanged at the ecosystem scale using the eddy covariance technique. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailLong term observations of carbon dioxide exchange over cultivated savanna under a Sudanian climate in Benin (West Africa)
Ago, Expédit Evariste; Agbossou, Euloge Kossi; Galle, Sylvie et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2014), 197

Turbulent CO2 exchanges between a cultivated Sudanian savanna and the atmosphere were measured during 29 months (August 2007–December 2009) by an eddy-covariance system in North-Western Benin, West Africa ... [more ▼]

Turbulent CO2 exchanges between a cultivated Sudanian savanna and the atmosphere were measured during 29 months (August 2007–December 2009) by an eddy-covariance system in North-Western Benin, West Africa. The site (Lat 9.74◦ N, Long 1.60◦ E, Alt: 449 m) is the one of three sites fitted out by the international AMMA-CATCH program. The flux station footprint area is mainly composed of herbs and crops with some sparse trees and shrubs. Fluxes data were completed by an inventory of dominating species around the tower and the meteorological measurements. Flux response to climatic and edaphic factors was studied. Water was found the main controlling factor of ecosystem dynamics: much larger uptake was found in wet than dry season. During wet season, a very clear answer of net CO2 fluxes to photosynthetic photon fluxes density (PPFD) was observed. A low limitation in response to saturation deficit and soil water variability was however observed. The total ecosystem respiration (TER) was found highly dependent on soil moisture below 0.1 m3m−3, but saturates above this threshold. The average annual carbon sequestration was 232 ± 27 gC m−2 with its inter-annual variability mainly controlled by TER. Finally, the ecosystem appeared more efficient during morning and wet season than during afternoon and dry period. [less ▲]

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See detailMEASUREMENT OF CATTLE METHANE EMISSIONS USING THE EDDY-COVARIANCE TECHNIQUE
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2014)

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions [1]. Recent technological advances in spectroscopy now permit methane flux ... [more ▼]

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions [1]. Recent technological advances in spectroscopy now permit methane flux measurement using eddy covariance. Methane fluxes exchanged by a pasture were measured continuously since June 2012 at the Dorinne Terrestrial Observatory in Belgium. During grazing periods, fluxes are dominated by enteric fermentation. Methane emissions were found strongly related to cattle stocking rate. When fluxes are integrated over large periods and assuming a random position of cows on the pasture, emission per LSU (Livestock Unit) was found to be 53±3 kg CH4 year-1 LSU-1. Recently, cattle position on the grassland was monitored continuously using GPS devices and combined with a footprint analysis [2] to derive more precisely the CH4 emission per LSU. A first experiment with a stocking rate close to 0.7 LSU ha-1 validated the approach and ended in a mean emission per head of 51±10 kg CH4 year-1 head-1. This approach also allows estimating emissions per head at the hourly scale and therefore opens the possibility of studying the circadian emission cycle and to link emissions to feeding behavior of the animal and feed quality. [less ▲]

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See detailYearly Follow-up of Methane Turbulent Exchange Over an Intensively Grazed Pasture in Belgium
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2014), 79(1), 91-96

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See detailEtablissement du bilan de carbone d’une exploitation agricole wallonne pratiquant le système allaitant : effets du climat et de la gestion du pâturage. Rapport de synthèse. Janvier 2012 – Décembre 2013.
Jerome, Elisabeth ULg; Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg et al

Report (2013)

Dans l’optique d’une atténuation des émissions de Gaz à Effet de Serre (GES) des systèmes d’élevage, les écosystèmes prairiaux peuvent jouer un rôle important vu leur potentiel de séquestration de carbone ... [more ▼]

Dans l’optique d’une atténuation des émissions de Gaz à Effet de Serre (GES) des systèmes d’élevage, les écosystèmes prairiaux peuvent jouer un rôle important vu leur potentiel de séquestration de carbone (C) dans les sols. Une évaluation pertinente de la contribution des systèmes d’élevage herbivores aux émissions de GES nécessite de raisonner en termes de bilan, en considérant à la fois les sources de GES et leur compensation via la séquestration de carbone par les prairies. Le projet « Etablissement du bilan de carbone d’une exploitation agricole wallonne pratiquant le système allaitant : effets du climat et de la gestion du pâturage » a pour objectif d’établir un inventaire de la contribution nette des systèmes d’élevage en Wallonie aux flux de GES (CO2, N2O, CH4). A long terme, nous étudierons les possibilités de réduction de ces émissions nettes par des adaptations des modes de conduite des systèmes d’élevage en adéquation avec leurs objectifs économiques et sociaux. L’exploitation étudiée est une exploitation agricole du type « naisseur-éleveur ». L’élevage se compose de vaches allaitantes et des veaux non sevrés de l’année de race « Blanc Bleu Belge culard ». Le système d’alimentation se base essentiellement sur la prairie permanente durant la période estivale et les produits conservés de la prairie durant la période hivernale. Ce rapport constitue l’état d’avancement du projet au terme de la deuxième biennale. [less ▲]

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See detailPhotosynthesis-dependent isoprene emission from leaf to planet in a global carbon-chemistry-climate model
Unger, N.; Harper, K.; Zheng, Y. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2013), 13

We describe the implementation of a biochemical model of isoprene emission that depends on the electron requirement for isoprene synthesis into the Farquhar–Ball–Berry leaf model of photosynthesis and ... [more ▼]

We describe the implementation of a biochemical model of isoprene emission that depends on the electron requirement for isoprene synthesis into the Farquhar–Ball–Berry leaf model of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance that is embedded within a global chemistry-climate simulation framework. The isoprene production is calculated as a function of electron transport-limited photosynthesis, intercellular and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, and canopy temperature. The vegetation biophysics module computes the photosynthetic uptake of carbon dioxide coupled with the transpiration of water vapor and the isoprene emission rate at the 30 min physical integration time step of the global chemistry-climate model. In the model, the rate of carbon assimilation provides the dominant control on isoprene emission variability over canopy temperature. A control simulation representative of the present-day climatic state that uses 8 plant functional types (PFTs), prescribed phenology and generic PFT-specific isoprene emission potentials (fraction of electrons available for isoprene synthesis) reproduces 50% of the variability across different ecosystems and seasons in a global database of 28 measured campaign-average fluxes. Compared to time-varying isoprene flux measurements at 9 select sites, the model authentically captures the observed variability in the 30 min average diurnal cycle (R2 = 64–96 %) and simulates the flux magnitude to within a factor of 2. The control run yields a global isoprene source strength of 451 TgC yr−1 that increases by 30% in the artificial absence of plant water stress and by 55% for potential natural vegetation. [less ▲]

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See detailÉlaboration du référentiel de compétences du master bioingénieur en Sciences et Technologies de l'Environnement
Colaux-Castillo-Bocanegra, Catherine ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg; Debouche, Charles ULg et al

in Poulin, Richard (Ed.) Séminaire CITEF 2013 La liaison formation-emploi : l'approche compétences et la formation tout au long de la vie (2013, October 18)

Le département des Sciences et Technologies de l’Environnement (STE) de Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech faculté de l’Université de Liège a profité d’un changement d’intitulé de son diplôme de bioingénieur pour ... [more ▼]

Le département des Sciences et Technologies de l’Environnement (STE) de Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech faculté de l’Université de Liège a profité d’un changement d’intitulé de son diplôme de bioingénieur pour réviser son programme des études. Pour ce faire, il a adopté l’approche compétence. Afin de préparer au mieux ses futurs diplômés aux attentes du monde professionnel actuel et à venir, des anciens diplômés et des employeurs potentiels ont participé à la validation du référentiel de compétences associé à cette formation. Cette publication reprend les étapes clés de la création du référentiel de compétences et son exploitation dans la conception d’un programme des études cohérent. [less ▲]

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See detailCattle methane fluxes measurement over an intensively grazed grassland using eddy covariance
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg et al

Poster (2013, September)

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions (European Commission, 2009). Recent technological advances in spectroscopy now ... [more ▼]

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions (European Commission, 2009). Recent technological advances in spectroscopy now permit methane flux measurement using eddy covariance. This method has numerous strengths. It can measure fluxes in situ, continuously and across broad areas. This provides information about meadow and cattle emission behaviour throughout the year and across a broad range of climatic conditions. We will present here a one year monitoring of methane exchange between an intensively grazed meadow and the atmosphere obtained using the eddy-covariance method. Methane fluxes exchanged by a grazed meadow were measured continuously since June 2012 at the Dorinne Terrestrial Observatory (50˚ 18’ 44” N; 4˚ 58’ 07” E; 248 m asl.) in Belgium. The site is an intensively pastured meadow of 4.2 ha managed according to the regional common practices where up to 30 Belgian Blue cows are grazing simultaneously. Flux measurements were made with the eddy covariance technique, using a fast CH4 analyzer (Picarro G2311-f) and a sonic anemometer (Campbell Csat3). Carbon dioxide fluxes and various micro-meteorological and soil variables, biomass growth and stocking rate evolution were also measured at the site. Turbulent fluxes were calculated according to standard eddy covariance computation schemes and were filtered for non-stationarity and for low friction velocity (u*) events. During grazing periods, fluxes are dominated by the enteric fermentation source and average 111 nmol m-2 s-1. They are highly variable, probably due to cow movements in and out the measurement footprint and cow digestion rhythm. Despite this spread, a daily emission rhythm is observed with higher emissions during the afternoon. When fluxes are integrated over large periods, methane emissions were found strongly related to cattle stocking rate with a slope of 7.34±0.78 mol CH4 day-1 LSU-1. Further developments are ongoing in order to improve cattle geo-localization through infra-red cameras and individual home-made GPS devices. The two systems will be compared in terms of cost, efficiency and ease of use. During cow-free periods, the methane flux averages 10.5 nmol m-2 s-1 and is highly variable with some production peaks above 100 nmol m-2 s-1. No relation was found between methane fluxes and soil temperature while a weak negative relation was found between methane fluxes and soil humidity. No soil methane absorption has been observed. European Commission. Fifth National Communication from the European Community Under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Technical Report - 2009 – 038 (2009). [less ▲]

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See detailVertical canopy gradient in photosynthesis and monoterpenoid emissions: An insight into the chemistry and physiology behind
Simpraga, M.; Verbeeck, H.; Bloemen, J. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2013), 80

It is well known that vertical canopy gradients and varying sky conditions influence photosynthesis (Pn), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf thickness (LT) and leaf pigments (lutein, â-carotene and ... [more ▼]

It is well known that vertical canopy gradients and varying sky conditions influence photosynthesis (Pn), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf thickness (LT) and leaf pigments (lutein, â-carotene and chlorophyll). In contrast, little is known about these effects on monoterpenoid (MT) emissions. Our study examines simultaneously measured Pn, MT emissions and the MT/Pn ratio along the canopy of an adult European beech tree (Fagus sylvatica L.) in natural forest conditions. Dynamic branch enclosure systems were used at four heights in the canopy (7, 14, 21 and 25 m) in order to establish relationships and better understand the interaction between Pn and MT emissions under both sunny and cloudy sky conditions. Clear differences in Pn, MT emissions and the MT/Pn ratio were detected within the canopy. The highest Pn rates were observed in the sun leaves at 25 m due to the higher intercepted light levels, whereas MT emissions (and the MT/Pn ratio) were unexpectedly highest in the semi-shaded leaves at 21 m. The higher Pn rates and, apparently contradictory, lower MT emissions in the sun leaves may be explained by the hypothesis of Owen and Peñuelas (2005), stating synthesis of more photo-protective carotenoids may decrease the emissions of volatile isoprenoids (including MTs) because they both share the same biochemical precursors. In addition, leaf traits like SLA, LT and leaf pigments clearly differed with height in the canopy, suggesting that the leaf’s physiological status cannot be neglected in future research on biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) when aiming at developing new and/or improved emission algorithms. [less ▲]

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See detailLong term measurements of VOC exchanges above a maize field at Lonzée (Belgium)
Bachy, Aurélie ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; SALERNO, Giovanni ULg et al

Poster (2013, June 10)

For the last decades, VOC had arisen scientifict interest due to their important role in the atmospheric chemistry and their final impact on air pollution and climate change. Terrestrial ecosystems being ... [more ▼]

For the last decades, VOC had arisen scientifict interest due to their important role in the atmospheric chemistry and their final impact on air pollution and climate change. Terrestrial ecosystems being the main VOC source, evaluation of current and future biogenic VOC emissions through VOC exchange modeling is thus necessary to better estimate future climate and assess future air pollution risks. BVOC exchanges depend on edaphic variables and are plant species specific. Therefore, their modeling and global budget evaluation requires a comprehensive understanding of production and exchange dynamics under a wide panel of climatic conditions and ecosystems, which necesserily implies BVOC exchange measurements under varied conditions. In that perspective, forest and non pastured grasslands have been largely studied for the last decade, but knowledge about BVOC fluxes from croplands remains still scarce. As a consequence, crop species-specific standard emissions that feed bottom-up BVOC emission models are still often assigned to a default value that is in addition kept constant for the entire growth season, although recent research has shown that plant phenology, acclimation and stress can drastically influence BVOC emissions. To help filling this knowledge gap, we run a project that aims to study VOC fluxes from two major croplands, maize (2nd most important culture worldwide) and winter wheat (1st most important culture worldwide), and a pastured grassland. We present here a specific study focussing on the VOC exchanges between a maize field and the atmosphere. VOC fluxes were measured at ecosystem-scale during the whole 2012 growing season using the eddy covariance by mass-scaning technique with a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer. Together with VOC fluxes, we also recorded a wide set of ancillary data including CO2 fluxes, meteorological variables and biomass evolution. As far as we know, we are the first study dealing with BVOC measurements on maize at ecosystem scale and spanning all the phenological stages of the crop. Although first results show half-hourly bidirectionnal exchanges among all the preselected compounds, in average methanol is the greatest emitted VOC, followed by green leaf volatiles. Acetic acid and acetaldehyde are the greatest taken up VOC. Small isoprene and monoterpene fluxes are also observed. A diurnal pattern is found for all those VOC, with greater emission/uptake during the day, suggesting a flux dependence on environmental parameters. Influence of environmental controls, biomass evolution (including growth primary production) and phenology on fluxes is currently under investigation. Our research allows to quantify BVOC exchanges by a maize field throughout a whole growing season. Hence, obtained results will refine the understanding of the BVOC exchanges mechanisms by including both environmental and phenological parameters. Such results are expected to be very useful for BVOC modeling, especially for oxygenated compounds such as methanol. [less ▲]

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