References of "Happi Emaga, Thomas"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRipening influences banana and plantain peels composition and energy content
Happi Emaga, Thomas ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Angeesens, Richard et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2011), 43

Musa sp. peels are widely used by smallholders as complementary feeds for cattle in the tropics. A study of the influence of the variety and the maturation stage of the fruit on fermentability and ... [more ▼]

Musa sp. peels are widely used by smallholders as complementary feeds for cattle in the tropics. A study of the influence of the variety and the maturation stage of the fruit on fermentability and metabolisable energy (ME) content of the peels was performed using banana (Yangambi Km5) and plantain (Big Ebanga) peels at three stages of maturation in an in vitro model of the rumen. Peel samples were analysed for starch, free sugars and fibre composition. Samples were incubated in the presence of rumen fluid. Kinetics of gas production were modelled, ME content was calculated using prediction equation and short-chain fatty acids production and molar ratio were measured after 72 h of fermentation. Final gas production was higher in plantain (269–339 ml g−1) compared to banana (237–328 ml g−1) and plantain exhibited higher ME contents (8.9–9.7 MJ/kg of dry matter, DM) compared to banana (7.7–8.8 MJ/kg of DM). Butyrate molar ratio decreased with maturity of the peels. The main influence of the variety and the stage of maturation on all fermentation parameters as well as ME contents of the peels was correlated to changes in the carbohydrate fraction of the peels, including starch and fibre. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 128 (29 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterization of pectins extracted from banana peels (Musa AAA) under different conditions using an experimental design
Happi Emaga, Thomas ULg; Ronkart, Sébastien ULg; Robert, Christelle et al

in Food Chemistry (2008), 108(2), 463-471

Detailed reference viewed: 305 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDietary fibre components and pectin chemical features of peels during ripening in banana and plantain varieties.
Happi Emaga, Thomas ULg; Robert, Christelle; Ronkart, Sébastien ULg et al

in Bioresource Technology (2008), 99(10), 4346-4354

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of the stage of maturation and varieties on the chemical composition of banana and plantain peels
Happi Emaga, Thomas ULg; Andrianaivo, Rado; Wathelet, Bernard ULg et al

in Food Chemistry (2007), 103(2), 590-600

A study of the chemical composition of six varieties of fruit peels of the banana and plantain: dessert banana (Musa AAA), plantain (Musa AAB) cooking banana (Musa ABB) and hybrid (Musa AAAB) at three ... [more ▼]

A study of the chemical composition of six varieties of fruit peels of the banana and plantain: dessert banana (Musa AAA), plantain (Musa AAB) cooking banana (Musa ABB) and hybrid (Musa AAAB) at three stages of ripeness, was carried out in order to explore their potential applications. The varieties did not affect chemical constituents in a consistent manner. Peel of the six varieties was rich in total dietary fibre (TDF) (40-50%). The protein content in peel of the banana and plantain was 8-11%. Leucine, valine, phenylalanine and threonine were essential amino acids in significant quantities: Lysine was the limiting amino acid. The content of lipid varied from 2.2% to 10.9% and was rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid. Potassium was the most significant mineral element. Peel of plantain was richer in starch than were the banana peels. Maturation of fruits involved increase in soluble sugar content and, at the same time, decrease in starch. The degradation of the starch under the action of the endogenous enzymes, may explain the increase in the soluble sugar content. Further investigations on the composition and the physiological functions (using animal-feeding experiments) of these dietary fibres must be considered. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 190 (14 ULg)