References of "Daenen, Frédéric"
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See detailDopa-responsive parkinsonism after acute subdural hematoma.
MAERTENS DE NOORDHOUT, Alain ULg; DAENEN, Frédéric ULg; Bex, Vincent

in European Journal of Neurology (2006), 13(7), 10-1

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See detailWhole-body positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose in patients with metastases of unknown primary tumours (CUP syndrome)
Alberini, J. L.; Belhocine, Tarik; Hustinx, Roland ULg et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (2003), 24(10), 1081-1086

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performances of whole body 2-[F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging for the detection of the primary tumour in patients ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performances of whole body 2-[F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging for the detection of the primary tumour in patients with metastases of unknown origin. Forty-one patients, without previous history of known cancer (18 women and 23 men; average age 64.1 years) with metastasis confirmed by histopathological analysis were included in a retrospective study. Results of PET were compared with those of techniques used in the current conventional diagnostic procedure. All known metastatic lesions were detected by PET. There were 26 true-positive and two false-negative results. Primary tumour remained undetermined in eight patients after conventional investigations and PET. PET was superior to conventional diagnostic procedure in 11 patients and led to modify treatment in 11 patients. Sensitivity of PET was superior than computed tomography in detecting abdominal primary tumours. FDG PET is useful in patients with unknown primary tumour because its sensitivity is good and it could modify the disease management. Otherwise, PET allows the evaluation of the extent of the disease and could be used to monitor treatment efficiency. Its contribution has to be evaluated particularly in patients with primary tumour with a specific treatment. ((C) 2003 Lippincott Williams Wilkins). [less ▲]

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See detailMaladie de Horton et atteintes arterielles extratemporales: utilite de la tomographie par emission de positons au 18FDG. A propos de trois observations et d'une revue de la litterature
Belhocine, Tarik; Kaye, Olivier; Delanaye, Pierre ULg et al

in Revue de Médecine Interne (2002), 23(7), 584-91

PURPOSE: We report three cases of Horton's disease, in which F18-Fluorine-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated a clinically unsuspected extra-cranial vessels ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: We report three cases of Horton's disease, in which F18-Fluorine-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated a clinically unsuspected extra-cranial vessels hypermetabolism. METHODS: Fully corrected whole-body PET was performed in three patients (two women, one man) for exploring a marked inflammatory syndrome. Scanning was acquired 60 min after i.v. injection of 222 MBq of 18FDG in average. RESULTS: In two patients with histologically proven Horton's disease, PET alone showed increased glucose metabolism involving the carotid and sub-clavian arteries as well as the ascending aorta, aortic arch, thoracic and abdominal aorta, and the iliac and femoral arteries. In the third patient, by detecting cervical, thoracic and abdominal vessel hypermetabolism, PET non-invasively contributed to the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. All patients had complete clinical and biological response to corticoids. PET controls performed 3- to 6-months post-treatment, confirmed the disappearance of the metabolic stigma. CONCLUSION: 18FDG PET may show an increased glucose metabolism in asymptomatic extracranial vessels locations of Horton's arterities. If these observations are confirmed on controlled trials, PET could be particularly useful for non-invasive diagnosing, staging and monitoring atypical clinical forms of Horton's disease. The metabolic imaging could also contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of GCA. [less ▲]

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See detailIs FDG bowel uptake modified by oral spasmolytic premedication ?
DE BARSY, C.; DAENEN, Frédéric ULg; BENARD, F. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2002), 43

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See detailGamma-probe-directed lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymphadenectomy in primary cutaneous melanoma.
Belhocine, T.; Pierard, Gérald ULg; Gielen, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Dermatology : International Journal for Clinical & Investigative Dermatology (2002), 204(4), 355-61

BACKGROUND: Radiotracer and blue-dye lymphatic mapping is a recommended combined method to guide sentinel lymphadenectomy and full regional lymph node dissection in selected patients with cutaneous ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Radiotracer and blue-dye lymphatic mapping is a recommended combined method to guide sentinel lymphadenectomy and full regional lymph node dissection in selected patients with cutaneous melanoma. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and the prognostic value of gamma-probe-directed lymphatic mapping in cutaneous melanomas. METHODS: Sixty-five stage I and II melanoma patients underwent gamma-probe-directed lymphatic mapping. Sentinel lymph nodes were studied by both conventional and immunohistochemical stainings. The median follow-up was 11 months. RESULTS: Sensitivities of preoperative and intraoperative sentinel lymph node detection were 100 and 98%, respectively. Only 1 failure of detection and 1 missed same-basin metastasis were experienced in the axillary and cervical areas, respectively. Eleven patients (16.9%) had sentinel node metastases leading to adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSION: Gamma-probe-directed lymphatic mapping is useful for staging melanoma. However, in the expectation of a more specific identification of the sentinel lymph node, the standard protocol remains recommended for exploring the axillary and cervical areas. The histological examination supported in some cases by immunohistochemistry remains mandatory in all cases. [less ▲]

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See detailApplications en oncologie thoracique de la TEP--18FDG
Bury, Thierry ULg; Daenen, Frédéric ULg; Duysinx, Bernard ULg et al

in Revue des Maladies Respiratoires (2001), 18(6, Pt 1), 623-30

PositIon emission tomography using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) is an imaging technique based on metabolic criteria rather than morphological criteria. We discuss the contribution of this technique in ... [more ▼]

PositIon emission tomography using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) is an imaging technique based on metabolic criteria rather than morphological criteria. We discuss the contribution of this technique in the field of pulmonary oncology and we summarize our work which has demonstrated the performance capacity of PET: to discriminate the malignant nature of a solitary pulmonary nodule; to improve sensitivity over CT for mediastinal assessment in non-small cell lung cancer; to seRach for distant metastasis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer; to complement CT imaging to better dissociate tumor residue or recurrence from post-therapeutic sequelae in non-small cell lung cancer. Finally, we present different expected progress for the future. [less ▲]

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See detailUsefulness of sentinel node biopsy and FDG PET imaging in loco-regional lymph node staging of malignant melanoma.
BELHOCINE, T.; HUSTINX, Roland ULg; GIELEN, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2001), 42

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See detailUsefulness of FDG-PET imaging in the management of cervical carcinoma.
BELHOCINE, T.; HUSTINX, Roland ULg; KRIDELKA, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2001), 42

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See detailApport de la tomographie par émission de positons pour la détection des tumeurs primitives lors de la découverte de métastases
Albérini, Jean-Louis; Belhocine, Tarik; Daenen, Frédéric ULg et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2001), 88(5), 518-519

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See detailTypical Appearance of Mesothelioma on an F-18 Fdg Positron Emission Tomograph
Belhocine, T. Z.; Daenen, Frédéric ULg; Duysinx, Bernard ULg et al

in Clinical Nuclear Medicine (2000), 25(8), 636

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See detailTomographie a emission de positons au 18FDG et adenocarcinome pancreatique
Daenen, Frédéric ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Belhocine, Tarik et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2000), 55(2), 89-94

FDG-PET imaging non invasively studies the glucose metabolism which is usually increased in malignant lesions. We evaluated the clinical performance of PET for detecting pancreatic cancer and its ... [more ▼]

FDG-PET imaging non invasively studies the glucose metabolism which is usually increased in malignant lesions. We evaluated the clinical performance of PET for detecting pancreatic cancer and its recurrence. In our series of 24 studies, PET appears to complement other imaging modalities. As compared to CT, in particular, it demonstrated fewer false positive results in the pancreas and it was also more sensitive. Moreover, whole-body FDG-PET allows for the entire staging of the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailPET for carcinomas of the genitourinary system
Belhocine, Tarik; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Devillers, Céline ULg et al

in Khakhali, I.; Laublant, J.; Goldsmith, S. J. (Eds.) NUCLEAR ONCOLOGY : DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY (2000)

This book is intended to provide the state-of-the-art in the present knowledge of the fast growing field of nuclear oncology. The enormous sum of data it gathers is presented by the leading authors in ... [more ▼]

This book is intended to provide the state-of-the-art in the present knowledge of the fast growing field of nuclear oncology. The enormous sum of data it gathers is presented by the leading authors in their respective fields. Recent breakthrough as well as validated techniques are explained in details. Among the most stimulating issues, it becomes clear that the long awaited era of radioimmunotherapy is finally coming to reality and is close to enter into routine clinical use. Several chapters are devoted to this future important aspect of our practice. They should allow the reader to become quickly and completely informed about the main results of the recent trials and also to comprehend the expected evolutions in this field. Positron emission tomography (PET) also occupies a large place. Numerous illustrations help the reader to appreciate the wide capabilities of this technique. The more usual radiopharmaceuticals labeled by single photons emitters are not forgotten and all the aspects of the daily practice of nuclear oncology are covered, from thyroid and bone imaging to sentinel lymph node detection. The first part of the book covers transversally the field of nuclear oncology. A radiopharmaceuticals chapter provides an in-depth review of the properties and chemistry of the single-photon and positron emitters radionuclides. The various mechanisms of localization are also described at the membrane level as well as for metabolic substrates. The properties of the agents aiming at hormone receptors and tumor antigens are excellently described, as well as the recently introduced gene expression imaging. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is divided in two parts. The breast cancer chapter retraces the history and background of sestamibi in the detection of MDR. It also describes the methodology and clinical results of the most important scintigraphic studies that have demonstrated the possibility to detect the early development of resistance to chemotherapy. An interesting series of other agents with a high potential in this indication, particularly positron emitters, is discussed. The role of technetium and positron agents for MDR detection in other tumor localisations, especially in the lung, is also well covered. An instrumentation chapter goes through the fundamentals of planar and SPECT imaging, and also presents the new reconstruction and correction algorithms. A large section is occupied by positron imaging. The pros and cons of dedicated detector and camera coincidence are very well detailed. This part should definitely help to decide those who are trying to make a choice between these two options. The general principles of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies imaging and therapy are covered in two very interesting chapters. Then radiotherapy of painful bone metastases compares the capabilities of the various agents available. A large chapter deals with pediatric nuclear oncology, in particular neuroblastoma, bone and central nervous system tumors. Finally, the often forgotten role of nuclear medicine in the detection, and possibly in the prevention, of the cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity resulting from cancer therapy are addressed at the end of that first part. The second part of the book goes by organ and begins by addressing brain tumors. A vast chapter is devoted to PET imaging. Besides the tracers and instrumentation issues, patient management occupies a central place, in particular with discussion on the role of nuclear medicine in tissue characterization, treatment planning and assessment of treatment response. Cerebrospinal fluid and shunt imaging are described, with particular attention paid to ventriculoperitoneal shunts. After PET imaging of head and neck carcinoma, a chapter extensively reviews thyroid carcinoma. Iodine therapy and long-term monitoring are covered with great details and useful practical recommendations are provided. Emerging radioimmunotherapy is discussed apart. Parathyroid scintigraphy also occupies a large and well documented chapter. PET imaging of lung carcinoma is particularly well illustrated by several cases. The potential of peptide scintigraphy is presented. Breast cancer occupies five chapters, namely, scintimammography, PET imaging, lymphatic mapping, monoclonal antibody imaging and radionuclide therapy. This provides an extensive review of the present and potential possibilities of nuclear medicine in one of the most frequent tumors. Then the role of PET imaging and the capabilities of radioimmunotherapy for maligancies of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts are presented, in particular in two chapters entirely dedicated to prostate carcinoma and in two others to ovarian carcinoma. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogues and their value in the diagnosis and treatment of the neuroendocrine tumors are reviewed. Hepatic neoplasia are addressed through the utilization of technetium-labeled galactosyl neoglycoalbumin and hepatic artery infusion. For lymphomas, besides gallium and PET imaging, a very complete chapter is devoted to monoclonal antibody therapy. The extremely promising results obtained with several radiolabeled-anti-CD monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas are reviewed in depth. Additional chapters cover adrenal tumors, melanoma, musculoskeletal tumors, in particular imaging of bone metastases. This comprehensive, didactic, up-to-date, well illustrated review of nuclear oncology should help nuclear medicine physicians as well as oncologists to optimize their practice. This book is intended to provide the state-of-the-art in the present knowledge of the fast growing field of nuclear oncology. The enormous sum of data it gathers is presented by the leading authors in their respective fields. Recent breakthrough as well as validated techniques are explained in details. Among the most stimulating issues, it becomes clear that the long awaited era of radioimmunotherapy is finally coming to reality and is close to enter into routine clinical use. Several chapters are devoted to this future important aspect of our practice. They should allow the reader to become quickly and completely informed about the main results of the recent trials and also to comprehend the expected evolutions in this field. Positron emission tomography (PET) also occupies a large place. Numerous illustrations help the reader to appreciate the wide capabilities of this technique. The more usual radiopharmaceuticals labeled by single photons emitters are not forgotten and all the aspects of the daily practice of nuclear oncology are covered, from thyroid and bone imaging to sentinel lymph node detection. The first part of the book covers transversally the field of nuclear oncology. A radiopharmaceuticals chapter provides an in-depth review of the properties and chemistry of the single-photon and positron emitters radionuclides. The various mechanisms of localization are also described at the membrane level as well as for metabolic substrates. The properties of the agents aiming at hormone receptors and tumor antigens are excellently described, as well as the recently introduced gene expression imaging. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is divided in two parts. The breast cancer chapter retraces the history and background of sestamibi in the detection of MDR. It also describes the methodology and clinical results of the most important scintigraphic studies that have demonstrated the possibility to detect the early development of resistance to chemotherapy. An interesting series of other agents with a high potential in this indication, particularly positron emitters, is discussed. The role of technetium and positron agents for MDR detection in other tumor localisations, especially in the lung, is also well covered. An instrumentation chapter goes through the fundamentals of planar and SPECT imaging, and also presents the new reconstruction and correction algorithms. A large section is occupied by positron imaging. The pros and cons of dedicated detector and camera coincidence are very well detailed. This part should definitely help to decide those who are trying to make a choice between these two options. The general principles of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies imaging and therapy are covered in two very interesting chapters. Then radiotherapy of painful bone metastases compares the capabilities of the various agents available. A large chapter deals with pediatric nuclear oncology, in particular neuroblastoma, bone and central nervous system tumors. Finally, the often forgotten role of nuclear medicine in the detection, and possibly in the prevention, of the cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity resulting from cancer therapy are addressed at the end of that first part. The second part of the book goes by organ and begins by addressing brain tumors. A vast chapter is devoted to PET imaging. Besides the tracers and instrumentation issues, patient management occupies a central place, in particular with discussion on the role of nuclear medicine in tissue characterization, treatment planning and assessment of treatment response. Cerebrospinal fluid and shunt imaging are described, with particular attention paid to ventriculoperitoneal shunts. After PET imaging of head and neck carcinoma, a chapter extensively reviews thyroid carcinoma. Iodine therapy and long-term monitoring are covered with great details and useful practical recommendations are provided. Emerging radioimmunotherapy is discussed apart. Parathyroid scintigraphy also occupies a large and well documented chapter. PET imaging of lung carcinoma is particularly well illustrated by several cases. The potential of peptide scintigraphy is presented. Breast cancer occupies five chapters, namely, scintimammography, PET imaging, lymphatic mapping, monoclonal antibody imaging and radionuclide therapy. This provides an extensive review of the present and potential possibilities of nuclear medicine in one of the most frequent tumors. Then the role of PET imaging and the capabilities of radioimmunotherapy for maligancies of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts are presented, in particular in two chapters entirely dedicated to prostate carcinoma and in two others to ovarian carcinoma. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogues and their value in the diagnosis and treatment of the neuroendocrine tumors are reviewed. Hepatic neoplasia are addressed through the utilization of technetium-labeled galactosyl neoglycoalbumin and hepatic artery infusion. For lymphomas, besides gallium and PET imaging, a very complete chapter is devoted to monoclonal antibody therapy. The extremely promising results obtained with several radiolabeled-anti-CD monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas are reviewed in depth. Additional chapters cover adrenal tumors, melanoma, musculoskeletal tumors, in particular imaging of bone metastases. This comprehensive, didactic, up-to-date, well illustrated review of nuclear oncology should help nuclear medicine physicians as well as oncologists to optimize their practice. [less ▲]

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See detailIntérêt de la tomographie a émission de positons dans l'évaluation des tumeurs digestives
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Paulus, Patrick; Daenen, Frédéric ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1999), 54(12), 925-30

Imaging and endoscopic techniques have taken an increasing part in the management of gastroenterological disorders. Among these techniques, FDG-PET imaging has emerged as a powerful tool in the management ... [more ▼]

Imaging and endoscopic techniques have taken an increasing part in the management of gastroenterological disorders. Among these techniques, FDG-PET imaging has emerged as a powerful tool in the management of several cancer diseases, including tumors of the digestive tract. In particular, the role of PET for diagnosing and staging recurrent colorectal cancers, and for differentiating mass forming pancreatitis from carcinoma is now well established. In this review, we will briefly discuss the place of PET imaging in the work-up of the tumors of the digestive tract. [less ▲]

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See detailInteret clinique de la tomographie a emission de positons dans la detection et le bilan d'extension des recidives des cancers colorectaux
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Paulus, P.; Daenen, Frédéric ULg et al

in Gastroentérologie Clinique et Biologique (1999), 23(3), 323-9

BACKGROUND: Positron emission tomography (PET) has been shown useful for the staging of patients with various carcinomas. METHODS: We have applied this technique to 54 cases of colorectal carcinoma and ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Positron emission tomography (PET) has been shown useful for the staging of patients with various carcinomas. METHODS: We have applied this technique to 54 cases of colorectal carcinoma and compared it to conventional imaging techniques. RESULTS: PET had moderately higher sensitivity and specificity than conventional techniques to detect individual lesion sites (75% vs 70.8% and 63% vs 21% respectively). It detected the same number of patients with recurrences (35/39) but overestimated disease less frequently (5 cases vs 12). PET favorably influenced therapeutic management in 17 patients, indicating different or additional surgery in 9 while avoiding surgery with curative intent or unnecessary surgery in 8. In 5 cases, erroneous information provided by PET could be corrected by conventional imaging techniques. CONCLUSION: We conclude that PET appears to provide complementary information useful for staging patients with colorectal carcinomas. It can significantly modify patients management. These data should be confirmed by a prospective study. [less ▲]

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See detailIntérêt de la tomographie à émission de positons dans l'évaluation des tumeurs gastro-intestinales
Rigo, Pierre ULg; Albérini, Jean-Louis; Hustinx, Roland ULg et al

in Acta Endoscopica (1999), 29(2), 129-138

La TEP au 18FDG présente de nombreuses indications dans l'évaluation des tumeurs digestives. Son rôle principal concerne le bilan d'extension des récidives tumorales démontrées ou suspectées mais des ... [more ▼]

La TEP au 18FDG présente de nombreuses indications dans l'évaluation des tumeurs digestives. Son rôle principal concerne le bilan d'extension des récidives tumorales démontrées ou suspectées mais des indications plus ponctuelles concernent évalement le diagnostic différentiel des masses pancréatiques et le bilan du cancer de l'oesophage. Le principal avantage de la TEP résulte de la nature métabolique du signal indépendant et complémentaire des modifications anatomiques visibles en imagerie classique. Un autre avantage est lié à l'examen du corps entier aujourd'hui pratiqué systématiquement. La TEP trouve dès lors sa place en première ligne dans ses différentes indications. [less ▲]

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See detailValue of FDG-PET in detecting residual or recurrent nonsmall cell lung cancer
Bury, Thierry ULg; Corhay, Jean-Louis ULg; Duysinx, Bernard ULg et al

in European Respiratory Journal (1999), 14(6), 1376-1380

In order to evaluate the usefulness of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the assessment of therapeutic effects, a study was performed before and after therapy in 126 ... [more ▼]

In order to evaluate the usefulness of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the assessment of therapeutic effects, a study was performed before and after therapy in 126 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) codified stage I to stage IIIB. Treatment with an early curative result was given in 58 patients, whereas in 68 cases it was limited to palliation. During the treatment follow-up period (8-40 months), each patient was evaluated every 3 months by clinical examination and ≤6 months by imaging techniques (PET and computed tomography (CT)). A diagnosis of persistent or recurrent tumour was established by means of pathological analysis in 31 patients and by clinical evolution and subsequent imaging progression in 29 other patients. PET showed increased FDG uptake in all cases (n=60) of persistent or recurrent tumour, whereas CT was nonspecific in 17 cases. Conversely, there were five false positive cases via PET imaging and three via CT. In detecting residual or recurrent NSCLC, PET had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92%, whereas CT had a sensitivity and specificity of 71% and 95% respectively. In conclusion, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography correctly identified response to therapy in 96% (121 of 126) of patients. Positron emission tomography appears to be more accurate (p=0.05) than conventional imaging in distinguishing persistent or recurrent tumour from fibrotic scar in patients undergoing treatment for non-small cell lung cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailFluorine-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography for the detection of bone metastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancer
Bury, Thierry ULg; BARRETO, A.; Daenen, Frédéric ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine (1998), 9

Despite advances in morphological imaging, some patients with lung cancer are found to have non resectable disease at surgery or die of recurrence within a year of surgery. At present, metastatic bone ... [more ▼]

Despite advances in morphological imaging, some patients with lung cancer are found to have non resectable disease at surgery or die of recurrence within a year of surgery. At present, metastatic bone involvement is usually assessed using bone scintigraphy, which has a high sensitivity but a poor specificity. We have attempted to evaluate the utility of the fluorine-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) for the detection of bone metastasis. One hundred and ten consecutive patients with histological diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent both FDG PET and bone scintigraphy were selected for this review. In this group, there were 43 patients with metastatic disease (stage IV). Among these. 21 (19% of total group) had one or several bone metastases confirmed by biopsy (n = 8) or radiographic techniques (n = 13). Radionuclide bone scanning correctly identified 54 out of 89 cases without osseous involvement and 19 out of 21 osseous involvements. On the other hand, FDG PET correctly identified the absence of osseous involvement in 87 out of 89 patients and the presence of bone metastasis in 19 out of 21 patients. Thus using PET there were two false-negative and two false-positive cases. PET and bone scanning had, respectively, an accuracy of 96% and 66% in the evaluation of osseous involvement in patients with NSCLC. In conclusion, our data suggest that whole-body FDG PET may be useful in detecting bone metastases in patients with known NSCLC. [less ▲]

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See detailUsefulness of 18fdg Positron Emission Tomography in Detection and Follow-up of Digestive Cancers
Paulus, P.; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Daenen, Frédéric ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (1997), 60(4, Oct-Dec), 278-80

PET is a diagnostic method that creates high resolution, 3 dimensional tomographic images of the distribution of positron emitting radionuclides in the human body. Recent technological developments allow ... [more ▼]

PET is a diagnostic method that creates high resolution, 3 dimensional tomographic images of the distribution of positron emitting radionuclides in the human body. Recent technological developments allow the use of whole-body PET devices in clinical oncology. 18FDG is a glucose analog transported and competitively used with glucose reflecting the increased glucose metabolism into malignant cells. Differential diagnosis between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer is already a well-documented indication. For initial staging of gastro-esophageal and colorectal tumours, results are preliminary but the clinical impact seems to be rather limited. At present, the major indication of FDG-PET is the detection and staging of colorectal cancer recurrences. FDG-PET allows the differentiation between scared tissue and tumour when structural imaging is often confusing. In the same time, the whole-body imaging capability provides unique information that can modify loco-regional and liver staging. Overall, FDG-PET affects the clinical management of 30 to 40% of these patients. Quantitative assessment of therapeutic response to chemotherapy regimen appears to be one of the most promising applications of FDG-PET. Since the most effective therapy of colorectal cancer are often surgical, the role of chemotherapy in colorectal cancer remains limited to adjuvant therapy and in advanced disease. However, FDG-PET could be of great value in assessing the response of oesophageal carcinomas to chemo-radio therapy, before surgery. In our experience, FDG-PET appears to be the first line diagnostic method in the detection and staging of colorectal recurrence and differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumour versus chronic pancreatitis. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of recurrent colorectal carcinoma with whole-body FDG-PET
DAENEN, Frédéric ULg; HUSTINX, Roland ULg; PAULUS, P. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (1996, May), 37

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See detailPET imaging of liver metastases: a retrospective study.
HUSTINX, Roland ULg; PAULUS, P.; DAENEN, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (1996, May), 37

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