References of "Cloes, Marc"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailHigh School Sport in Belgium (Wallonia)
Cloes, Marc ULg

Conference (2017, July 31)

In Belgium, since 1969, sport is a competence under the control of public authorities defined according to the linguistic regime. As in most Western European countries, sport has been compartmentalised by ... [more ▼]

In Belgium, since 1969, sport is a competence under the control of public authorities defined according to the linguistic regime. As in most Western European countries, sport has been compartmentalised by giving rise to three main types of practice: "professional", "traditional" and "alternative" sports (Diegel, 1995). Clubs linked to sports federations constitute the local setting up of the sports organization, which is largely a majority (Zintz, 2014). Other operators from the public domain and the private sphere coexist (Cloes, 2012). In the school environment, sport can be found in three contexts: within the compulsory curriculum (physical education), integrated to extracurricular activities (activities organized during recess or free periods), and peripheral activities (use of school sports facilities by organizers who are not belonging to the school actors). If inter-school competitions are organized by several school sports federations (depending to the educational network), they are far from reaching the interest and involvement reached by the competitions managed by the traditional sports federations. So there is hardly any systematic sports training in French-speaking Belgian schools. Some PE teachers propose voluntary training sessions but there are less and less connections between their actions and sport clubs. On the other hand, young sportsmen appointed by the Minister of Sports have a special status enabling them to benefit facilities to pursue their double career. They are sometimes gathered in special organizations - sport-studies or development centers - which have been the subject of several studies (Cloes et al., 2002, Lacrosse et al., 2014, Theunissen et al., 2016) but PE teachers are very few involved in these development opportunities. In many situations of partnership between the school and sports structures, their role is often limited to a simple accompanying action (sports days, projects "My club-My school." Cloes (2017) insisted however on the need to make them a priority in the coordination of the preparation of physically educated citizens. References Cloes, M. (2012). La Wallonie en mouvement : vers une culture sportive et de l’activité physique ? In, M. Germain et R. Robaye (Eds.), L'état de la Wallonie. Portrait d'un pays et de ses habitants – 2011. (pp. 70-80). Namur : Les éditions namuroises. Available on Internet : http://hdl.handle.net/2268/117294 Cloes, M. (2017). Preparing physically educated citizens in physical education. Expectations and practices. Retos, 31, 245-251. Available on Internet : http://recyt.fecyt.es/index.php/retos/article/view/53497/32304 Cloes, M., Schelings, V., Ledent, M, & Piéron, M. (2002). Sport-études : comparaison des caractéristiques motivationnelles et des relations sociales des élèves sportifs et de leurs condisciples. eJRIEPS (e Journal de la Recherche sur l'Intervention en Éducation Physique et Sport), 1, 57-72. Available on Internet: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/10187 Diegel, H. (1995). Sport in changing society – Sociological essays. Schorndorf: Verlag Karl Haufmann. Lacrosse, Z., Martin, V., & Cloes, M. (2014, July). Analyse qualitative du fonctionnement du centre de formation d’une fédération sportive. Paper presented at the 8ème biennale de l’ARIS ‘Temps, temporalités et intervention en EPS et en sport’, Genève, Suisse. Available on Internet: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/170020 Theunissen, C., Meys, G., & Cloes, M. (2016). Encadrement du staff autour du double projet des sportifs dans un centre de formation en handball. Revue de l’Éducation physique, 56, 1/2, 20. Disponible sur Internet: http://yessport.be/educationphysique/file/REVUE_1_ET_2_2016_-2eme_COLLOQUE_GUY_NAMUROIS.pdf ou http://orbi.ulg.ac.be/handle/2268/199016 Zintz, T. (2014). Module 3 - Le paysage sportif : du pratiquant aux fédérations. Thématique 1 - Cadre institutionnel et législatif. Cours généraux de la formation ‘Moniteur Sportif Initiateur’. Brussels, Belgium : Administration des sports, Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles. Internet : http://www.sport.cfwb.be/index.php?id=7370 [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of a giant exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity among nursing home residents: a preliminary study
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Gillet, Nicolas; Mouton, Flore et al

Conference (2017, July 08)

Purpose: This study examined the effects of a giant (4 meters by 3 meters) exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA) and on a broader array of physical and psychological ... [more ▼]

Purpose: This study examined the effects of a giant (4 meters by 3 meters) exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA) and on a broader array of physical and psychological outcomes among nursing home residents. Materials and methods: A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was carried out in two comparable nursing homes. Ten participants (aged 82.5 ± 6.3 and comprising 6 women) meeting the inclusion criteria took part to the one-month intervention in one nursing home, whereas eleven participants (aged 89.9 ± 3.1 with 8 women) were assigned to the control group in the other nursing home. The giant exercising board game required participants to perform strength, flexibility, balance and endurance activities. The assistance provided by an exercising specialist decreased gradually during the intervention in an autonomy-oriented approach, based on the self-determination theory (SDT). The following were assessed at baseline, after the intervention and after a follow-up period of three months: PA (steps/day and energy expenditure/day with ActiGraph, GT3X+), cognitive status (MMSE), quality of life (EQ-5D), motivation for PA (BREQ-2), gait and balance (Tinetti and SPPB), functional mobility (Timed Up and Go) and the muscular isometric strength of the lower limb muscles. Results and conclusions: In the intervention group, PA increased from 2921 steps/day at baseline to 3358 steps/day after the intervention (+14.9%, p = 0.04) and 4083 steps/day (+39.8%, p = 0.03) after three months. Energy expenditure/day also increased after the intervention (+110 kcal/day, +6.3%, p = 0.01) and after three months (+219 kcal/day, +12.3%, p = 0.02). Quality of life (p < 0.05), balance and gait (p < 0.05), and strength of the ankle (p < 0.05) were also improved after three months. Such improvements were not observed in the control group. The preliminary results are promising but further investigation is required to confirm and evaluate the longterm effectiveness of PA interventions in nursing homes [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHealth and physical education from a European perspective
Cloes, Marc ULg

Conference (2017, July 07)

At the end of the 20th century, several authors pointed out that physical education (PE) was crossing a crisis. The emphasis on the fight against a growing sedentariness of the society became ... [more ▼]

At the end of the 20th century, several authors pointed out that physical education (PE) was crossing a crisis. The emphasis on the fight against a growing sedentariness of the society became progressively one of the priorities of the national education leaders all around the world. In many countries, PE teachers had to implement new approaches in order to teach to the youth how to adopt a healthy lifestyle. Pre- and in-service PE teachers’ training started to propose programmes integrating health education in PE lessons while the reputation of the physical literacy concept spread quickly. Recently, Chin and Edginton (2014) invited scholars from 40 nationalities to describe the contemporary policies and practices of health and PE applied in their countries. Among those contributions, 23 concerned European countries. In this presentation, we will propose an overview of the trends that can be identified in this sample of European nations. Preliminary analysis underlines that combination of PE and health education is distributed along a continuum. At one extremity, PE’s input on health is not clearly expressed even if PE is expected to improve pupils and students’ health through selected activities like endurance training. At the opposite extremity, countries emphasize the role of the PE teacher as a health educator and not only through a limited focus on PA promotion and on the preparation of physically educated citizens. The second part of the paper will illustrate some actions that are undertaken in order to motivate the PE teachers to implement 'health enhanced physical activity' projects in their lessons. Such approaches respect principles associated with the concept of quality physical education (QPE). These PE classes should allow students to have positive individual and collective learning experiences where they develop knowledge, skills and dispositions that allow them to be autonomous and responsible decision makers relative to engagement in PA and sport in their lives (AIESEP, 2014). PE teachers need a new framework (Haerens et al., 2011) in order to leave their ingrained professional practices.. That starts by changing their representations on physical activity. Action-research, development of communities of practice, pedagogical cases and demonstration of the students’ interest for teaching approaches focusing on lifestyle aspects represent promising strategies to succeed in the process of changing the priorities. AIESEP (2014). 2014 AIESEP Position Statement on Physical Education Teacher Education. Available on Internet: http://aiesep.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/2014-AIESEP-Position-Statement-on-Physical-Education-Teacher-Education.pdf Chin, M.-K. & Edginton, C.R. (2014). Physical Education and Health Global Perspectives and Best Practice. Urbana, IL: Sagamore. Haerens, L., Kirk, D., Cardon, G., & De Bourdeaudhuij, I. (2011). Toward the Development of a Pedagogical Model for Health-Based Physical Education, Quest, 63:3, 321-338. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGood practices in adapted physical activity for cancer patients and survivors: opinion of the Raviva program participants
Rompen, Jérôme ULg; Scharff, Jules; Cloes, Marc ULg

Conference (2017, July)

Introduction The Belgian Foundation against Cancer proposes an adapted physical activity (APA) program for cancer patients and survivors, called Raviva (http://www.cancer.be/raviva-bouger-pour-se-sentir ... [more ▼]

Introduction The Belgian Foundation against Cancer proposes an adapted physical activity (APA) program for cancer patients and survivors, called Raviva (http://www.cancer.be/raviva-bouger-pour-se-sentir-mieux).The activities are supervised by instructors with inconstant trainings and experiences. Contrary to other countries, Belgian APA instructors do not necessarily need to follow specific education programs such those proposed by the ACSM (Schmitz et al., 2010) or other organizations that propose exercise guidelines for cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to identify good practices in APA for cancer patients and survivors concerning activity characteristics and instructors behaviors, from the point of view of the Raviva program participants. Methods Firstly, an online questionnaire was submitted to Raviva participants; 72 of them filled it in. Secondly, 3 video-stimulated recall interviews were conducted after 3 different Raviva sessions (fitness, yoga and aqua-aerobics), each time with another participant. Results and discussion The sessions characteristics that participants like the most are related to the choice and quality of the proposed exercises (22% of responses) and to the perceived benefits of the activities (20%). The most appreciated qualities for an instructor are related to his/her human qualities (43%) and his/her expertise (32%). What participants like least about the sessions is a poor organization (27%) and what they like least about the instructors is linked to bad choices of exercises (18%). The video-stimulated recall interviews confirmed these data and provided more precision. Finally, we noticed that differences in responses were observed depending on the type of activity participants took part in. These findings could help instructors adapt their practices to their participants’ needs in order to promote adherence to physical activity among this population. References Schmitz, K. H., Courneya, K. S., Matthews, C., Demark-Wahnefried, W., Galvão, D. a, Pinto, B. M., … Schwartz, A. L. (2010). American College of Sports Medicine roundtable on exercise guidelines for cancer survivors. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 42(7), 1409‑26. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181e0c112 [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInvolvement of PE teachers in motor testing. A pilot study with the MOBAK-1
Cloes, Marc ULg; Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Jidovtseff, Boris ULg et al

Conference (2017, January 28)

Fundamental motor patterns are prerequisites to specific motor/sports skills and a determinant of the involvement in physical activity. Several tools have been developed in order to measure motor ... [more ▼]

Fundamental motor patterns are prerequisites to specific motor/sports skills and a determinant of the involvement in physical activity. Several tools have been developed in order to measure motor development in children. Each test battery presents its own characteristics. MOBAK-1 focuses on two categories of basic motor competencies in order to record the effects of physical education (PE) at the elementary school level. That tool proposed 8 tests. For each of them, pupils receive point scores (0–2 points) according to the quality of their performance. MOBAK-1 is supposed to be used by PE teachers but there is still a lack of data about this, justifying the present study. We trained 7 PE teachers (4 males) and analysed the way they implemented the tests in their classes (1st and 2d grades – 6-8 year-old pupils). The training comprised a description of the tests with video examples of the expected movements and common errors, and an analysis of the reliability of the teachers evaluating pupils’ performances showed on video (at least 10 trials). A participating observation and a short interview were planned to analyse the evaluation process of each PE teacher. Catching and Rolling reached the reliability requirements within the first 10 trials while 15 to 16 videos were necessary for the six other tests. Two teachers seemed to have more difficulties that could be related to their lack of experience (P1) or a potential lower interest (P7). Before implementing the test with their classes, all teachers read again the guidelines. The majority was really satisfied by the information provided by the researchers (3.86/4) and confident about how to manage the evaluation (3.57/4). Five teachers worked alone and 4 were able to evaluate one class/lesson. All teachers developed specific strategies in order to save time. Several practical recommendations have been proposed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMotor assessment of children at school: Pupils’ opinion about MOBAK-1
Cloes, Marc ULg; Vandermeeren, Benjamin

Conference (2017, January 28)

School is a privileged place for evaluating children’s physical and motor competencies. Tests are often used for educational and/or research purposes. Adults collect the data but do not verify how ... [more ▼]

School is a privileged place for evaluating children’s physical and motor competencies. Tests are often used for educational and/or research purposes. Adults collect the data but do not verify how children experience these evaluations that can be perceived as difficult moments. Even if they are supposed to motivate pupils, they can decrease the self-perception and limit the participation. Several test batteries have been developed in order to measure motor development of young children (M-ABC, KTK, TGMD …). They are based on the assessment of performances. On the other hand, MOBAK-1 has been developed in order to verify if some motor competencies are mastered or not. To our knowledge, no study tried to determine how the pupils passing these tests feel about their experience. This study focused on that original topic. Seven primary school PE teachers administrated the MOBAK-1 tests to their classes (149 1st and 2d grades – 6-8 year-old). After the tests, pupils fulfilled an adapted questionnaire based on pictograms designed to facilitate pupils’ understanding. The most important finding is that 80.5% of the pupils answered that they loved doing the tests. Only 3 pupils expressed a negative opinion. As pointed out by the correlation between the real achievement mean scores and the perceived competence mean score for each test (r= 0.90), pupil’s self-assessment seemed appropriate. The correlation between the perceived competence and appraisal of the tests is lower (r=0.59). The gamelike status of some tests would be more determinant for their appraisal by the pupils than their level of achievement: balancing is definitely the most appreciated test (35.6% of the pupils selected it). In the same way, even if the achievement level is not high, throwing is relatively well appreciated. Trying to touch a target with a ball is funny. On the other hand, jumping and bouncing were ‘less’ appreciated. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailElaboration of a water familiarization testing battery adapted for young children
Vandermeulen, Mary ULg; Schiettecatte, Delphine; Delvaux, Anne ULg et al

Poster (2017, January 27)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasuring children motor skills with MOBACK-1: descriptive data and critical analysis
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Vandeloise, Vérane; Cloes, Marc ULg et al

in Sääkslahti, Arja (Ed.) The book of abstracts (2017, January)

Introduction The development of motor skills competencies is critical during childhood should be considered as the central learning outcome in physical education. Assessing motor competencies of the ... [more ▼]

Introduction The development of motor skills competencies is critical during childhood should be considered as the central learning outcome in physical education. Assessing motor competencies of the children make sense for teachers, trainers and researchers. The MOBAK-1 testing battery has been recently developed with the aim of assessing a wide panel of motor skills in relationship with locomotion and object-control abilities (1). This battery is complete and easy to use but present a scoring system that is only based on the success or the failure of the task. The aim of the study was to collect descriptive data from Belgian children with MOBAK-1, and to do a critical analysis of the scoring system through the analysis of the failure reasons in the tests. Methods The MOBAK-1 testing battery (1) was addressed to 166 primary school pupils (7.2±0.6 YO) coming from the French speaking part of Belgium. For each test, children received a score from 0 to 2, according to the number of success and fails in the task. Additionally, the evaluator took notes of the failure reasons when it occurs. Results Results from our subjects were in accordance with a previous study (1) for all tests except rolling and jumping tasks. The analysis of the failure reasons revealed that some criteria were too severe as some children failed while they were almost able to do the test correctly. This appeared especially in the rolling and jumping tests where the score did not really reflect the level of the children. Conclusion MOBACK-1 testing battery was successful to assess children motor skills for 6 out of 8 tests. Critical analysis of children failures in the tests revealed that some criteria seemed to be severe. Scoring system should be improved in order to inform about the children level in each test. References 1. Herrmann, C., Gerlach, E., & Seelig, H. (2015). Development and validation of a test instrument for the assessment of basic motor competencies in primary school. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 19(2), 80-90. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnalysis of Kids’ Athletics implementation in Wallonia
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Wuillaume, Sandrine; Cloes, Marc ULg

in Sakslahti, Arja (Ed.) Book of abstracts (2017, January)

Introduction Since decades in Wallonia (French speaking part of Belgium), athletics competitions for children are miniaturized versions of adults’ competitions. Despite the fact that it has been pointed ... [more ▼]

Introduction Since decades in Wallonia (French speaking part of Belgium), athletics competitions for children are miniaturized versions of adults’ competitions. Despite the fact that it has been pointed out that such kind of approach, based on performance, is not appropriated for motor learning and could result in an increased rate of dropout (1), no change has occurred since years. The International Association of Athletic Federation has developed and promoted a more appropriate model of competition for children under 10 years old: ‘Kids’Athletics’ (KA)(2). While this model is well known, it has not been selected by the Wallonian federation as the gold standard yet . This study aimed to analyze the perceived interest of a group of experts about KA, and to identify the strategies that could be considered for KA implementation in Wallonia. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 athletics or marketing experts (demographic presentation; knowledge about KA and personal experience with KA ; opinion about KA model in comparison with the traditional one, and ; strategies that could be helpful to implement KA in Wallonia). Results Findings showed that 12 experts knew the KA concept while 9 have experimented it in their own club. None mentioned an official competition between clubs. A list of KA’s advantages and disadvantages has been identified (organization, children needs, and development). All experts considered that KA was more adapted to children than traditional competition. Based on subjects’ proposals, a progressive strategy for KA implementation is suggested. It includes the support of the federation and recommends to start with the more convinced clubs. Conclusion This study confirms that KA should be implemented in Wallonia. In order to optimize the chances of success, it would be appropriate to multiply actions, taking into account the potential barriers identified by the experts. Keywords : Children, track and field, competition, Kids Athletics, Wallonia. References Gozzoli C., Locatelli, E., Massin, D., & Wangemann, B.. (2002). IAAF Kids’ Athletics : A team event for children. Monaco: IAAF Shields, D. L. & Bredemeier, B. L. (2009). True competition: A guide to pursuing excellence in sport and society. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPreparing physically educated citizens in physical education. Expectations and practices
Cloes, Marc ULg

in Retos (2017), 31

Since physical education (PE) became a compulsory school subject, its objectives have often been related to the expectations of society. Since the turn of the new millennium, this has resulted in PE being ... [more ▼]

Since physical education (PE) became a compulsory school subject, its objectives have often been related to the expectations of society. Since the turn of the new millennium, this has resulted in PE being increasingly linked to the promotion of physically active lifestyles. In this paper, we try to determine whether practitioners have the capacity to reach recent objectives for the subject or should reconsider their work on this issue. Moreover, we propose to extend the current focus on physical literacy to encompass the concept of societal transfer, underlining the need for an authentic pedagogy of PE. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of a giant exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity among nursing home residents: a preliminary study
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Gillet, Nicolas; Mouton, Flore et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(S1), 318

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of a giant exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity among nursing home residents: a preliminary study
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Gillet, Nicolas; Mouton, Flore et al

in Clinical Interventions in Aging (2017), 12

Purpose: This study examined the effects of a giant (4×3 m) exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA) and a broader array of physical and psychological outcomes among nursing ... [more ▼]

Purpose: This study examined the effects of a giant (4×3 m) exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA) and a broader array of physical and psychological outcomes among nursing home residents. Materials and methods: A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was carried out in two comparable nursing homes. Ten participants (aged 82.5±6.3 and comprising 6 women) meeting the inclusion criteria took part in the 1-month intervention in one nursing home, whereas 11 participants (aged 89.9±3.1 with 8 women) were assigned to the control group in the other nursing home. The giant exercising board game required participants to perform strength, flexibility, balance and endurance activities. The assistance provided by an exercising specialist decreased gradually during the intervention in an autonomy-oriented approach based on the self-determination theory. The following were assessed at baseline, after the intervention and after a follow-up period of 3 months: PA (steps/day and energy expenditure/day with ActiGraph), cognitive status (mini mental state examination), quality of life (EuroQol 5-dimensions), motivation for PA (Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2), gait and balance (Tinetti and Short Physical Performance Battery), functional mobility (timed up and go), and the muscular isometric strength of the lower limb muscles. Results and conclusion: In the intervention group, PA increased from 2,921 steps/day at baseline to 3,358 steps/day after the intervention (+14.9%, P=0.04) and 4,083 steps/day (+39.8%, P=0.03) after 3 months. Energy expenditure/day also increased after the intervention (+110 kcal/day, +6.3%, P=0.01) and after 3 months (+219 kcal/day, +12.3%, P=0.02). Quality of life (P,0.05), balance and gait (P,0.05), and strength of the ankle (P,0.05) were also improved after 3 months. Such improvements were not observed in the control group. The preliminary results are promising but further investigation is required to confirm and evaluate the long-term effectiveness of PA interventions in nursing homes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResults From Belgium’s 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth
Wijtzes, Anne I; Verloigne, Maïté; Mouton, Alexandre ULg et al

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health (2016), 13((Suppl 2)), 95-103

This 2016 Belgium Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth is the first systematic evaluation of physical activity (PA) behaviors, related health behaviors, health outcomes, and influences ... [more ▼]

This 2016 Belgium Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth is the first systematic evaluation of physical activity (PA) behaviors, related health behaviors, health outcomes, and influences thereon, using the Active Healthy Kids Canada grading framework. A research working group consisting of PA experts from both Flanders and Wallonia collaborated to determine the indicators to be graded, data sources to be used, and factors to be taken into account during the grading process. Grades were finalized after consensus was reached among the research working group and 2 stakeholder groups consisting of academic and policy experts in the fields of PA, sedentary behavior, and dietary behavior. Eleven indicators were selected and assigned the following grades: Overall PA (F+), Organized Sport Participation (C-), Active Play (C+), Active Transportation (C-), Sedentary Behaviors (D-), School (B-), Government Strategies and Investment (C+), and Weight Status (D). Incomplete grades were assigned to Family and Peers, Community and the Built Environment, and Dietary Behaviors due to a lack of nationally representative data. In conclusion, despite moderately positive social and environmental influences, PA levels of Belgian children and youth are low while levels of sedentary behaviors are high. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (11 ULg)
Full Text
See detailBouger à tout âge? Oui, mais …
Cloes, Marc ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLes seniors et la promotion d'activités physiques
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Cloes, Marc ULg

in Ferréol, Gilles (Ed.) Egalité, mixité, intégration par le sport - Equity, diversity, integration through sport (2016)

Malgré les nombreux bénéfices occasionnés par une pratique régulière d’activité physique (AP), la sédentarité touche une proportion grandissante de la population, et en particulier le public senior. Ainsi ... [more ▼]

Malgré les nombreux bénéfices occasionnés par une pratique régulière d’activité physique (AP), la sédentarité touche une proportion grandissante de la population, et en particulier le public senior. Ainsi, l’obésité, le diabète, l’ostéoporose, les maladies cardiovasculaires ou encore certains cancers sont tous amplifiés par l’inactivité physique. Par ailleurs, l’AP favorise l’intégration sociale des seniors et agit comme un agent protecteur vis-à-vis des maladies mentales. Dans une société occidentale vieillissante qui verra un doublement du nombre d’individus de 60 ans ou plus d’ici 2050, la promotion de l’AP pourrait contribuer à éviter un accroissement incontrôlé des dépenses en matière de santé publique. En effet, au-delà de l’espérance de vie en tant que telle, la pratique d’AP contribuerait à augmenter l’espérance de vie en bonne santé, sans incapacité. En agissant sur les déterminants modifiables de la pratique d’AP, qu’ils soient de nature comportementale ou environnementale, il est possible d’engendrer des changements significatifs. Cette présentation s’inscrit dans ce contexte général. Dans un premier temps, les principaux constats en matière de pratique d’AP chez les seniors ainsi que les déterminants, bénéfices et recommandations spécifiques à cette population seront exposés. Ensuite, la thématique de la promotion de l’AP spécifique au public senior sera abordée. Un exemple de démarche de promotion de l’AP originale, combinant un outil en ligne (www.bougerplus.be) ainsi qu’un cours collectif, sera illustrée au moyen d’un extrait vidéo et agrémentée de quelques résultats de recherche. Un autre exemple de démarche originale, concernant plus particulièrement le public institutionnalisé en maison de retraite, montrera comment il est possible de continuer à faire bouger des résidents très âgés au moyen d’un jeu de société à taille humaine orientée vers la pratique d’AP. Enfin, nous clôturerons l’exposé en présentant une perspective intergénérationnelle de la promotion de l’AP, regroupant seniors et enfants, en présentant quelques extraits vidéos liés à des projets de recherche qui ont été développés récemment. En effet, au-delà des bénéficies de santé engendrés par l’AP, les activités intergénérationnelles tendant à favoriser l’intégration en diminuant les stéréotypes (âgisme) perçus entre les générations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL'activité physique, cette inconnue
Cloes, Marc ULg

in Ferréol, Gilles (Ed.) Egalité, mixité, intégration par le sport - Equity, diversity, integration through sport (2016)

L’activité physique et la sédentarité constituent deux notions qui font partie de notre vie quotidienne en tant que pôles opposés d’un style de vie sain. Comme cela est souligné dans plusieurs méta ... [more ▼]

L’activité physique et la sédentarité constituent deux notions qui font partie de notre vie quotidienne en tant que pôles opposés d’un style de vie sain. Comme cela est souligné dans plusieurs méta-analyses récentes, des niveaux de preuve élevés mettent clairement en évidence un lien favorable entre l’activité physique et la santé en général, un impact positif sur la prévention de plusieurs maladies non transmissibles et/ou un effet bénéfique dans leur traitement. Parallèlement, l’existence d’un lien négatif entre la sédentarité et ces mêmes variables a été démontrée plus récemment. Ceci explique vraisemblablement pourquoi l’UNESCO a récemment rappelé ‘le droit fondamental d’accéder à l’éducation physique, à l’activité physique et au sport sans discrimination fondée sur l’appartenance ethnique, le genre, l’orientation sexuelle, la langue, la religion, l’opinion politique ou toute autre opinion, l’origine nationale ou sociale, la fortune ou tout autre statut’ (Charte internationale de 2015). Qu’ils fassent partie de la population globale ou appartiennent à des professions sensées maîtriser les notions fondamentales relatives à l’activité physique et à la sédentarité, il apparait toutefois que les individus ne construisent pas toujours des représentations adéquates à propos de ces habitudes de vie. Constituant le point de départ de tout projet visant à modifier le comportement des citoyens, les représentations des gens à l’égard de l’activité physique devraient donc faire l’objet d’une attention particulière au sein de la société. En effet, la promotion d’un style de vie actif et la limitation de la sédentarité exigent une intervention multisectorielle, impliquant des professionnels des domaines de la santé et de l’éducation, des sports et des médias, des pouvoirs publics et du secteur privé, des services sociaux mais aussi les parents. Une question fondamentale consiste à vérifier si les toutes les personnes clés disposent des connaissances et compétences requises, si elles peuvent et souhaitent jouer ce rôle. Le fil conducteur de la conférence repose sur l’analyse des représentations du public à l’égard de l’activité physique. L’exposé, qui se veut interactif, s’articulera autour de trois thèmes principaux : (1) La définition de l’activité physique ; (2) Ses effets, et ; (3) Les recommandations. Les informations qui seront partagées viseront à apporter des ressources à exploiter dans la pratique. Par ailleurs, en proposant une approche ludique, l’intervention permettra aux participants d’aborder activement les notions fondamentales et de stimuler leur réflexion. Les situations originales mises en place permettront de révéler l’existence de mauvaises représentations et/ou de lacunes au niveau des connaissances qui devraient normalement être acquises à l’issue de la scolarité obligatoire. De nombreuses interactions avec le public et anecdotes seront proposés afin d’illustrer ce que chacun pourrait mettre en œuvre pour faciliter une réelle prise de conscience. A l’issue de l’exposé, une période d’échanges permettra à chacun de poser ses questions et de lancer une discussion au cours de laquelle conseils, trucs et astuces pourront être partagés. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHow to implement the recommendations for Quality Physical Education?
Cloes, Marc ULg; Ralaivao, Michel; Ranaivoson, Patrice et al

Conference (2016, September 03)

According to the growing of the sedentariness over the world and to its negative resulting consequences for the society, it is now mandatory to act. Following the socioecological model, the solution of ... [more ▼]

According to the growing of the sedentariness over the world and to its negative resulting consequences for the society, it is now mandatory to act. Following the socioecological model, the solution of this challenge can be found in a multi-sectoral approach involving all pillars of the society. School represents the corner stone of any project aiming to influence the future. It has been pointed out as a determining element in the impact of projects aiming to promote physical activity in children as well as in adolescents, particularly when combined with other actors such as the community. During school time, several opportunities are available in order to increase the time spent in physically active behavior. A quality physical education (QPE) plays a central role in such action of the school. In 2015, UNESCO proposed guidelines aiming to promote QPE all around the world. In fact, it appears that, in many countries, stakeholders as well as physical educators do not have the resources needed to change the current policies and practices. Moreover, literature does not provide theoretical/practical support that would be necessary to implement new teaching strategies. This symposium will focus on an action research aiming to go from theory to practice on a national level. The study is built on the collaboration between the International Committee of Sport Pedagogy and the ‘Académie Nationale des Sports’ (ANS) of Madagascar. It is designed to reform and modernize physical education and sports organization in this country. The cooperation focused on the improvement of the quality of physical education, school sports, and leisure/competitive sports practice. It is based on a bottom-up process. The major aim of this process is to identify the priorities of the country in order to improve the quality of physical education in schools, sports clubs and communities emphasizing diversity, accessibility, inclusion and equity. Qualitative approaches have been implemented in order to take into account the needs of the people and the available resources. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAssessing Basic Motor Competencies in Primary School – an International Comparative Study in Europe
Scheuer, Claude; Cloes, Marc ULg; Colella, Dario et al

Conference (2016, September 03)

A central aim of primary physical education (PE) is the promotion of physical competencies as a necessary condition of developing a physically active lifestyle and to be able to participate in the Olympic ... [more ▼]

A central aim of primary physical education (PE) is the promotion of physical competencies as a necessary condition of developing a physically active lifestyle and to be able to participate in the Olympic community. We defined basic motor competencies as physical performance dispositions, which evolved from task-specific requirements in the culture of sports and exercise. They are supposed to be learnable, based on previous experiences and can be improved through practice. Potential evaluations of effects in PE need to consider situation-specific and context-dependent characteristics of PE as well as prior experiences of pupils. Therefore, a design for test items, which are closely related to PE and vary in difficulty depending on the age of the pupils, is necessary. For this purpose, we developed the MOBAK-1 test instrument for the assessment of basic motor competencies in first graders. It allows teachers to identify groups in need of special support, and initiate these support measures to reduce inequalities. The first study took place in Zurich (Switzerland) and focused on construct validity (e.g., the factorial validity of the instrument). Between spring 2015 and spring 2016, the MOBAK-1 test instrument was and will be implemented in further countries in Europe. At this time, we have four samples of four different countries: (1) Switzerland (Zurich) (N = 317; girls = 55%; age: M = 7.04 years [SD = .37]; BMI = 16.08 [SD = 2.25]) assessed by University of Basel (Dr. Christian Herrmann); (2) Germany (Frankfurt) (N = 1061; girls = 45%; age: M = 6.80 years [SD = .89]; BMI = 16.30 [SD = 2.37]) assed by University of Frankfurt (Prof. Dr. Christopher Heim); (3) Lithuania (Kaunas) (N = 120; girls = 48%; age: M = 7.76 years [SD = .33]; BMI = 16.14 [SD = 2.30]) assessed by Lithuanian Sports University (Assoc. Prof. Dr. Arunas Emeljanovas); (4) Italy (Foggia) (N = 85; girls = 45%; age: M = 7.24 years [SD = .30]; BMI = 17.53 [SD = 3.04]) assessed by University of Foggia (Prof. Dr. Dario Colella). Further samples are currently on the way to be completed in four other countries: (1) Luxembourg (N = 280) assessed by University of Luxembourg (Claude Scheuer); (2) Slovakia (Trnava) (N = 240) assessed by University of Trnava (Dr. Dana Masarykova); (3) Czech Republic (Brno) (N = 600) assessed by University of Brno (Dr. Petr Vlcek); (4) Belgium (Liège) (N = 450) assessed by University of Liège (Prof. Dr. Marc Cloes and Dr. Boris Jidovtseff). In the initial validation study in Switzerland, two factors consisting of four items each were found. The related EFA (Study 1: CFI=.98; RMSEA=.024) and CFA (Study 2: CFI =.95; RMSEA=.044) revealed good model fit indices. The first factor “Locomotion” represents body movements (e.g., balancing), the second factor “Object-control” represents ball control (e.g., catching). Conclusions: The developed MOBAK test instrument meets psychometric validity demands based on the Swiss data. The presentation will show the results of the validation studies in further European countries and the results of the comparative study. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailNational PESS report : Belgium
Cloes, Marc ULg; Mouton, Alexandre ULg

Conference (2016, June 29)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPhysical education and leisure: What’s the link?
Cloes, Marc ULg

Conference (2016, June 27)

All around the world, practitioners and researchers point out that people are becoming less and less physically active and adopt more and more sedentary behaviours. Such changes in the Human lifestyle ... [more ▼]

All around the world, practitioners and researchers point out that people are becoming less and less physically active and adopt more and more sedentary behaviours. Such changes in the Human lifestyle could have dramatic consequences as pointed out by the ‘Designed to move’ movement (Morris, 2013). To fight against that irresistible evolution, the need of a multisectorial approach is illustrated by the complexity of the socio-ecological model (Sallis et al., 2006). It underlines the large array of variables that play in the physical activity that someone is able to integrate into his/her life. Nevertheless, school has been identified as one major pillar of the promotion of an active lifestyle (van Sluijs et al., 2007). According to the knowledge and specific competences that they acquire during their studies, physical education (PE) teachers are considered as the potential cornerstones of such action (Tappe & Burgeson, 2004). While it was traditionally focused on the development of the youth’s physical, motor, and social competences of the students, since two decades, PE is increasingly more associated to the preparation of physically educated citizens. It means that what the students learn during their PE lessons should be useful outside the school and for a lifelong term. This concept is become a determining pedagogical principle: the physical literacy (Whitehead, 2013). In parallel, PE teachers are now requested to play a role on the health of their students despite if few evidence confirm that they can be successful in influencing the future behaviours of the children/adolescents to who they teach (Green, 2014). New pedagogical approaches are proposed nowadays in order to increase the effectiveness of the PE teachers’ intervention. This is linked to another pedagogical principle: accountability. Leisure activities enter progressively in the PE curriculum. Students benefit of more experiences that they could operate in their community. This requires more partnerships between school and leisure actors in order to implement original projects. Students must learn to become autonomous and smart decision makers able to identify the way to integrate PA in their leisure. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (5 ULg)