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See detailIs there value in maintaining small populations ? Example of the Dual-Purpose Belgian Blue breed.
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Bastin, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2011, July 13)

Current status of thinking on genomic selection in dairy cattle is mostly major breed centric (e.g., Holstein) and only for traditional traits (e.g., milk yields). Once you depart from this, it becomes ... [more ▼]

Current status of thinking on genomic selection in dairy cattle is mostly major breed centric (e.g., Holstein) and only for traditional traits (e.g., milk yields). Once you depart from this, it becomes obvious that different, often related, issues appear (e.g., lack of large training populations, need for expensive recording of new phenotypes). Also, there is an urgent need to rethink issues that are important for sustainability of dairy production (e.g., added value foods, animal robustness). In this context, small populations (breeds/lines) could represent a potential source of extra information to justify their maintenance. As marker densities increase, efficient dissection of different selection histories of divergent breeds or lines, potentially identifying pockets of unexploited variability will increase. A current example from the Belgian (Walloon) perspective is the Dual Purpose (DP) line of the Belgian Blue Breed (BBB), with presently around 4500 breeding females, for historical reason of which only 1500 have good pedigrees, and which is present in Belgium and northern France. Recent research, done on this line, showed its tendency to produce less saturated milk fat and to have better fertility. Results indicated that it could stay competitive in specific markets, especially because of largely increased meat value. Currently, the myostatin mutation is largely used for breeding purposes. To assess the genetic diversity of the breed, recently, over 200 genotypes (SNP50K) for nearly all breeding bulls of the last 20 years became available. HD genotypes should be available in the near future, also allowing to access selection history of this breed as being in between the 2 extreme breeds: Beef BBB (with which it shares a recent history) and Holstein-Friesian (which is related through its geographic proximity over centuries). Finally, genomic selection for DP-BBB will need to consider a single step type approach without the need of reference population and potentially relying heavily on SNP3K of cows, also with the objective to recreate relationships between animals of interest. [less ▲]

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See detailIs there value in maintaining small populations ? Example of the Dual-Purpose Belgian Blue breed.
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Bastin, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2011), 94(E-suppl.1), 664

Current status of thinking on genomic selection in dairy cattle is mostly major breed centric (e.g., Holstein) and only for traditional traits (e.g., milk yields). Once you depart from this, it becomes ... [more ▼]

Current status of thinking on genomic selection in dairy cattle is mostly major breed centric (e.g., Holstein) and only for traditional traits (e.g., milk yields). Once you depart from this, it becomes obvious that different, often related, issues appear (e.g., lack of large training populations, need for expensive recording of new phenotypes). Also, there is an urgent need to rethink issues that are important for sustainability of dairy production (e.g., added value foods, animal robustness). In this context, small populations (breeds/lines) could represent a potential source of extra information to justify their maintenance. As marker densities increase, efficient dissection of different selection histories of divergent breeds or lines, potentially identifying pockets of unexploited variability will increase. A current example from the Belgian (Walloon) perspective is the Dual Purpose (DP) line of the Belgian Blue Breed (BBB), with presently around 4500 breeding females, for historical reason of which only 1500 have good pedigrees, and which is present in Belgium and northern France. Recent research, done on this line, showed its tendency to produce less saturated milk fat and to have better fertility. Results indicated that it could stay competitive in specific markets, especially because of largely increased meat value. Currently, the myostatin mutation is largely used for breeding purposes. To assess the genetic diversity of the breed, recently, over 200 genotypes (SNP50K) for nearly all breeding bulls of the last 20 years became available. HD genotypes should be available in the near future, also allowing to access selection history of this breed as being in between the 2 extreme breeds: Beef BBB (with which it shares a recent history) and Holstein-Friesian (which is related through its geographic proximity over centuries). Finally, genomic selection for DP-BBB will need to consider a single step type approach without the need of reference population and potentially relying heavily on SNP3K of cows, also with the objective to recreate relationships between animals of interest. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimating myostatin gene effect on milk performance traits using estimated gene content for a large number of non-genotyped cows
Buske, Bernd ULg; Szydlowski, Maciej; Verkenne, Catherine et al

in Animal (2011), 5(1), 43-47

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See detailDifferent estimation of heritabilities in dependence of major gene effects
Buske, Bernd ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Archiv Tierzucht / Archives Animal Breeding (2010), 53(6), 732-734

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See detailA robust method for simultaneous estimation of single gene and polygenic effects in dairy cows using externally estimated breeding values as prior information
Buske, Bernd ULg; Szydlowski, Maciej; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Journal of Animal Breeding & Genetics (2010), 127(4), 272-279

The aim of this study was to develop a robust method to estimate single gene and random polygenic animal effects simultaneously in a small field dataset with limited pedigree information. The new method ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to develop a robust method to estimate single gene and random polygenic animal effects simultaneously in a small field dataset with limited pedigree information. The new method was based on a Bayesian approach using additional prior information on the distribution of externally estimated breeding values. The field dataset consisted of 40 269 test-day records for milk performance traits for 1455 genotyped dairy cows for the 11 bp-deletion in the coding sequence of the myostatin gene. For all traits, estimated additive effects of the favoured wild-type allele (‘+’ allele) were smaller when applying the new method in comparison with the application of a conventional mixed inheritance test-day model. Dominance effects of the myostatin gene showed the same behaviour but were generally lower than additive effects. Robustness of methods was tested using a data-splitting technique, based on the correlation of estimated breeding values from two samples, with one-half of the data eliminated randomly from the first sample and the remaining data eliminated from the second sample. Results for 100 replicates showed that the correlation between split datasets when prior information included was higher than the conventional method. The new method led to more robust estimations for genetic effects and therefore has potential for use when only a small number of genotyped animals with field data and limited pedigree information are available. [less ▲]

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See detailGenomische Selektion: ein Meilenstein auch in der Schweinezucht?
Buske, Bernd ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

Article for general public (2009)

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See detailQTL and candidate genes for fecundity in sows
Buske, Bernd ULg; Sternstein, Ina; Brockmann, Gudrun

in Animal Reproduction Science (2006), 95(3), 167-183

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See detailAnalysis of association of GPX5, FUT1 and ESR2 genotypes with litter size in a commercial pig cross population
Buske, Bernd ULg; Sternstein, Ina; Reissmann, Monika et al

in Archiv für Tierzucht = Archives Animal Breeding (2006), 49(3), 259-268

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See detailDetection of novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CYP21 gene and association analysis of two SNPs for CYP21 and ESR2 with litter size in a commercial sow population
Buske, Bernd ULg; Sternstein, Ina; Reissmann, Monika et al

in Journal of Animal Breeding & Genetics (2006), 123(5), 343-348

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See detailAnalysis of candiate genes for prolificacy in two commercial sow populations
Buske, Bernd ULg; Sternstein, Ina; Brockmann, Gudrun

Poster (2006)

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See detailAnalysis of properdin (BF) genotypes associated with litter size in a commercial pig cross population
Buske, Bernd ULg; Brunsch, Christa; Zeller, Karin et al

in Journal of Animal Breeding & Genetics (2005), 122(4), 259-263

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See detailUntersuchung von Kandidatengenen auf Wurfgrösse beim Schwein: Literaturübersicht und eigene Ergebnisse
Buske, Bernd ULg; Reinecke, Peter; Brockmann, Gudrun

(2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (8 ULg)