References of "Breuskin, Ingrid"
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See detailFeasibility of oral feeding in patients with disorders of consciousness
Maudoux, Audrey ULg; BREUSKIN, Ingrid ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg et al

in Schnakers, Caroline; Laureys, Steven (Eds.) Coma and Disorders of Consciousness (2012)

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See detailFaisabilité d’une alimentation orale chez les patients avec troubles de la conscience
Maudoux, Audrey ULg; BREUSKIN, Ingrid ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg et al

in Schnakers, Caroline (Ed.) Coma et états de conscience altérée (2011)

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See detailGlial but not neuronal development in the cochleo-vestibular ganglion requires Sox10.
Breuskin, Ingrid ULg; Bodson, Morgan ULg; Thelen, Nicolas ULg et al

in Journal of Neurochemistry (2010), 114(6), 1827-39

The cochleo-vestibular ganglion contains neural crest-derived glial cells and sensory neurons that are derived from the neurogenic otic placode. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that ... [more ▼]

The cochleo-vestibular ganglion contains neural crest-derived glial cells and sensory neurons that are derived from the neurogenic otic placode. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate the tightly orchestrated development of this structure. Here, we report that Sox10, a high-mobility group DNA-binding domain transcription factor that is required for the proper development of neural crest cell derivatives, is specifically expressed in post-migratory neural crest cells in the cochleo-vestibular ganglion. Using Sox10-deficient mice, we demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for the survival, but not the generation, of the post-migratory neural crest cells within the inner ear. In the absence of these neural crest-derived cells, we have investigated the survival of the otocyst-derived auditory neurons. Surprisingly, auditory neuron differentiation, sensory target innervation and survival are conserved despite the absence of glial cells. Moreover, brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression is increased in the hair cells of Sox10-deficient mice, a compensatory mechanism that may prevent spiral ganglion neuronal cell death. Taken together, these data suggest that in the absence of neural crest-derived glial cells, an increase trophic support from hair cells promotes the survival of spiral ganglion neurons in Sox10 mutant mice. [less ▲]

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See detailHair cell progenitors: identification and regulatory genes
Bodson, Morgan ULg; Breuskin, Ingrid ULg; Lefèbvre, Philippe ULg et al

in Acta Oto-Laryngologica (2009), 10

Hair cell loss in higher vertebrates appears to be permanent. Progenitors that are quiescent in the organ of Corti are the best candidates for the restoration of the different cell types in the organ of ... [more ▼]

Hair cell loss in higher vertebrates appears to be permanent. Progenitors that are quiescent in the organ of Corti are the best candidates for the restoration of the different cell types in the organ of Corti. However, little is known about the presence of these progenitors and their capacity to differentiate into hair cells. This review will first highlight recent findings concerning the identification of progenitor cells that are able to proliferate and to differentiate into hair cells. Principal factors impinging on this process are then reviewed. Auditory hair cell progenitors have been identified and, under appropriate conditions, are capable of proliferating and differentiating into hair cells. Characterization of signals that maintain, expand and regulate these progenitors will be essential for the biomedical application of stem cell populations to restore hearing. [less ▲]

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See detailSox10 promotes the survival of cochlear progenitors during the establishment of the organ of Corti
Breuskin, Ingrid ULg; Bodson, Morgan ULg; Thelen, Nicolas ULg et al

in Developmental Biology (2009), 15(335), 327-339

Transcription factors of the SoxE family are critical players that underlie various embryological processes. However, little is known about their function during inner ear development. Here, we show that ... [more ▼]

Transcription factors of the SoxE family are critical players that underlie various embryological processes. However, little is known about their function during inner ear development. Here, we show that Sox10 is initially expressed throughout the otic vesicle epithelium and becomes later restricted to supporting cells as cell differentiation proceeds in the organ of Corti. Morphological analyses of Sox10 mutant mice reveal a significant shortening of the cochlear duct likely resulting from the progressive depletion of cochlear progenitors. While Sox10 appears dispensable for the differentiation and patterning of the inner ear prosensory progenitors, our data support a critical role for this transcription factor in the promotion of their survival. We provide genetic evidences that Sox10, in a concentration-dependant manner, could play a role in the regulation of Jagged1, a gene known to be important for inner ear prosensory development. Together, our results demonstrate that Sox10 regulates the biology of early cochlear progenitors during inner ear development, but, in contrast to neural crest-derived cells, this transcription factor is dispensable for their differentiation. Evidence also suggests that this effect occurs via the activation of the Jagged1 gene. [less ▲]

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See detailEarly identification of inner pillar cells during rat cochlear development.
Thelen, Nicolas ULg; Breuskin, Ingrid ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

in Cell & Tissue Research (2009), 337(1), 1-14

Although the structure of the auditory organ in mature mammals, the organ of Corti, is clearly established, its development is far from being elucidated. Here, we examine its spatio-temporal development ... [more ▼]

Although the structure of the auditory organ in mature mammals, the organ of Corti, is clearly established, its development is far from being elucidated. Here, we examine its spatio-temporal development in rats from embryonic day 16 (E16) to E19 by using cytochemical and immunocytochemical methods at the light- and electron-microscope levels. We demonstrate that the organ of Corti develops from a non-proliferating cell zone that is located in the junctional region between two edges of the dorsal epithelium of the cochlear duct. We also reveal that the first cells to develop in this zone are the inner pillar cells, a particular type of non-sensory supporting cell, which arise in the base of the cochlear duct at the boundary between the two ridges at E16. Cell differentiation in this prosensory region continues according to a base-to-apex gradient; the inner hair cells appear in the greater epithelial ridge at E17 and the outer hair cells in the lesser epithelial ridge at E18. At E19, the various cell types of the organ of Corti are in place. Finally, we show that unlike the development of all the supporting cell types of the organ of Corti, the development of inner pillar cells within the prosensory domain seems not to involve Notch1 activation. These results highlight the central role that the inner pillar cells probably play in the development of the organ of Corti. [less ▲]

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See detailStrategies to Regenerate Hair Cells: Identification of Progenitors and Critical Genes
Breuskin, Ingrid ULg; Bodson, Morgan ULg; Thelen, Nicolas ULg et al

in Hearing Research (2008), 236(1-2), 1-10

Deafness commonly results from a lesion of the sensory cells and/or of the neurons of the auditory part of the inner ear. There are currently no treatments designed to halt or reverse the progression of ... [more ▼]

Deafness commonly results from a lesion of the sensory cells and/or of the neurons of the auditory part of the inner ear. There are currently no treatments designed to halt or reverse the progression of hearing loss. A key goal in developing therapy for sensorineural deafness is the identification of strategies to replace lost hair cells. In amphibians and birds, a spontaneous post-injury regeneration of all inner ear sensory hair cells occurs. In contrast, in the mammalian cochlea, hair cells are only produced during embryogenesis. Many studies have been carried out in order to demonstrate the persistence of endogenous progenitors. The present review is first focused on the occurrence of spontaneous supernumerary hair cells and on nestin positive precursors found in the organ of Corti. A second approach to regenerating hair cells would be to find genes essential for their differentiation. This review will also focus on critical genes for embryonic hair cell formation such as the cell cycle related proteins, the Atoh1 gene and the Notch signaling pathway. Understanding mechanisms that underlie hair cell production is an essential prerequisite to defining therapeutic strategies to regenerate hair cells in the mature inner ear. [less ▲]

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See detailNew insights into peripherin expression in cochlear neurons
Lallemend, François; Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg; Hadjab, S. et al

in Neuroscience (2007), 150(1), 212-222

Peripherin is an intermediate filament protein that is expressed in peripheral and enteric neurons. In the cochlear nervous system, peripherin expression has been extensively used as a differentiation ... [more ▼]

Peripherin is an intermediate filament protein that is expressed in peripheral and enteric neurons. In the cochlear nervous system, peripherin expression has been extensively used as a differentiation marker by preferentially labeling the type II neuronal population at adulthood, but yet without knowing its function. Since the expression of peripherin has been associated in time with the process of axonal extension and during regeneration of nerve fibers in other systems, it was of interest to determine whether peripherin expression in cochlear neurons was a static phenotypic trait or rather prone to modifications following nerve injury. In the present study, we first compared the expression pattern of peripherin and beta III-tubulin from late embryonic stages to the adult in rat cochlea. The staining for both proteins was seen before birth within all cochlear neurons. By birth, and for 2 or 3 days, peripherin expression was gradually restricted to the type II neuronal population and their projections. In contrast, from postnatal day (P) 10 onwards, while the expression of beta III-tubulin was still found in projections of all cochlear neurons, only the type I population had beta III-tubulin immunoreactivity in their cell bodies. We next investigated the expression of peripherin in axotomized cochlear neurons using an organotypic explant model. Peripherin expression was surprisingly re-expressed in a vast majority of neurons after axotomy. In parallel, the expression and localization of beta III-tubulin and peripherin in dissociated cultures of cochlear neurons were studied. Both proteins were distributed along the entire neuronal length but exhibited complementary distribution, especially within the projections. Moreover, peripherin immunoreactivity was still abundant in the growth cone, whereas that of beta III-tubulin was decreasing at this compartment. Our findings are consistent with a model in which peripherin plays an important structural role in cochlear neurons and their projections during both development and regenerative processes and which is compatible with the assumption that frequently developmentally regulated factors are reactivated during neuronal regeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailStriatal PSA-NCAM(+) precursor cells from the newborn rat express functional glycine receptors
Nguyen, Laurent ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Breuskin, Ingrid ULg et al

in Neuroreport (2004), 15(4), 583-587

Immunocytochemical analysis showed that ionotropic glycine receptors are expressed in neurogenic progenitors purified from the newborn rat striatum and expressing the polysialylated form of the neural ... [more ▼]

Immunocytochemical analysis showed that ionotropic glycine receptors are expressed in neurogenic progenitors purified from the newborn rat striatum and expressing the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule, both in vitro and in situ. To ascertain whether glycine receptors were functional in vitro, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that glycine triggers inward strychnine-sensitive currents in the majority of these cells. Moreover, we found that glycine receptors expressed by these neurogenic progenitors display intermediate electrophysiological characteristics between those of glycine receptors expressed by neural stem cells and by mature interneurons from the rat striatum. Altogether, the present data show that functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors are expressed in neurogenic progenitors purified from the newborn rat striatum. [less ▲]

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See detailAutocrine/paracrine activation of the GABA(A) receptor inhibits the proliferation of neurogenic polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule-positive (PSA-NCAM+) precursor cells from postnatal striatum.
Nguyen, Laurent ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Breuskin, Ingrid ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2003), 23(8), 3278-94

GABA and its type A receptor (GABA(A)R) are present in the immature CNS and may function as growth-regulatory signals during the development of embryonic neural precursor cells. In the present study, on ... [more ▼]

GABA and its type A receptor (GABA(A)R) are present in the immature CNS and may function as growth-regulatory signals during the development of embryonic neural precursor cells. In the present study, on the basis of their isopycnic properties in a buoyant density gradient, we developed an isolation procedure that allowed us to purify proliferative neural precursor cells from early postnatal rat striatum, which expressed the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). These postnatal striatal PSA-NCAM+ cells were shown to proliferate in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and formed spheres that preferentially generated neurons in vitro. We demonstrated that PSA-NCAM+ neuronal precursors from postnatal striatum expressed GABA(A)R subunits in vitro and in situ. GABA elicited chloride currents in PSA-NCAM+ cells by activation of functional GABA(A)R that displayed a typical pharmacological profile. GABA(A)R activation in PSA-NCAM+ cells triggered a complex intracellular signaling combining a tonic inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and an increase of intracellular calcium concentration by opening of voltage-gated calcium channels. We observed that the activation of GABA(A)R in PSA-NCAM+ neuronal precursors from postnatal striatum inhibited cell cycle progression both in neurospheres and in organotypic slices. Furthermore, postnatal PSA-NCAM+ striatal cells synthesized and released GABA, thus creating an autocrine/paracrine mechanism that controls their proliferation. We showed that EGF modulated this autocrine/paracrine loop by decreasing GABA production in PSA-NCAM+ cells. This demonstration of GABA synthesis and GABA(A)R function in striatal PSA-NCAM+ cells may shed new light on the understanding of key extrinsic cues that regulate the developmental potential of postnatal neuronal precursors in the CNS. [less ▲]

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See detailSupernumerary outer hair cells arise external to the last row of sensory cells in the organ of corti.
Lefèbvre, Philippe ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Thiry, Marc ULg et al

in Acta Oto-Laryngologica (2001), 121(2), 164-8

During the development of the mammalian inner ear, the number of hair cells produced is highly regulated and remains constant throughout life. The mechanism underlying this regulation is beginning to be ... [more ▼]

During the development of the mammalian inner ear, the number of hair cells produced is highly regulated and remains constant throughout life. The mechanism underlying this regulation is beginning to be understood although many aspects still remain obscure. When late embryonic or early postnatal rat organs of Corti were cultured, the production of supernumerary hair cells was observed. This overproduction of sensory cells could be modulated by the addition of several growth factors. In this study, we examined explants of rat organs of Corti that produced supernumerary hair cells. In the supernumerary hair cell region, up to two rows of inner hair cells and five rows of outer hair cells were observed. Morphological evaluation of these specimens revealed that less mature hair cells were located in the most external rows of these sensory cells. When a supernumerary hair cell was produced, a supporting cell (i.e. Deiters' cell) was also produced, strongly suggesting that the conversion of a Deiters' cell into a hair cell was not the mechanism that produced these extra hair cells. Based on these results, we propose that prosensory cells located at the external edge of the organ of Corti retain a capacity to form hair cells and that it is these prosensory cells that differentiate into supernumerary hair cells and Deiters' cells. [less ▲]

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