References of "Belboom, Sandra"
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See detailDoes biobased polymer achieve better environmental impacts than fossil polymer? Comparison of fossil HDPE and biobased HDPE produced from sugar beet and wheat
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Biomass & Bioenergy (2016), 85

Polymers are one of the most used materials and the majority of their production is based on fossil fuels. Due to the decrease of oil resources and concerns about climate change, alternatives are needed ... [more ▼]

Polymers are one of the most used materials and the majority of their production is based on fossil fuels. Due to the decrease of oil resources and concerns about climate change, alternatives are needed, the transformation of biobased ethanol into biobased polymer being one of them. This paper undertakes an environmental evaluation of the production of biobased polymer produced from two different feedstock cultivated in Belgium: sugar beet and wheat. Both crops cultivation are studied as well as their transformation into biobased ethanol, first, and then to biobased ethylene, focusing on high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as final product. These scenarios are analyzed and compared with the production of conventional polymer using the life-cycle assessment (LCA) methodology with reference to relevant environmental impact categories. This study shows a reduction of impact of around 60% for both climate change and fossil fuel depletion categories when using biobased HDPE instead of its fossil counterpart. For all other impact categories, fossil HDPE achieves better results than the biobased product. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental impacts of phosphoric acid production using di-hemihydrate process: a Belgian case study
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Szöcs, Carl; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Journal of Cleaner Production (2015), 108

This paper undertakes an environmental evaluation of phosphoric acid production, using industrial data from Prayon SA in Belgium. Phosphoric acid is produced using the wet di-hemihydrate process also ... [more ▼]

This paper undertakes an environmental evaluation of phosphoric acid production, using industrial data from Prayon SA in Belgium. Phosphoric acid is produced using the wet di-hemihydrate process also called Central Prayon process. Both grades of phosphoric acid are evaluated: fertilizer and purified grades. Specificities of this plant are highlighted and improvements of the process in terms of energy and facilities integration through years are quantified as environmental benefits. The implementation on site of two sulphuric acid production facilities and their energetic integration allow a reduction of climate change impact of 80%. Results also show the importance of phosphogypsum valorisation which is sold for the main part in this case study. Concerning the purified grade, this specific process has been compared to the thermal process, using Best Available Techniques (BAT) values for the modelling. It shows a reduced environmental impact for the wet process in the majority of categories studies. [less ▲]

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See detailL’empreinte environnementale des pierres ornementales? Pour qui, pourquoi, comment?
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Renzoni, Roberto ULg; Tourneur, Francis ULg et al

Conference (2015, October 22)

Dans les matériaux de construction, la notion d’environnement et d’empreinte des produits devient de plus en plus importante que ce soit dans un cadre législatif ou comme objet de marketing. Dans ce ... [more ▼]

Dans les matériaux de construction, la notion d’environnement et d’empreinte des produits devient de plus en plus importante que ce soit dans un cadre législatif ou comme objet de marketing. Dans ce contexte, des études environnementales ont été réalisées sur divers produits belges en pierre bleue (dalles, bordures, marches) ainsi qu’en grès (pavés). Ces études ont été menées en utilisant la méthodologie de l’Analyse du Cycle de Vie (ACV) et ont permis de mettre en évidence les étapes prépondérantes de leur production dans une optique d’écoconception ainsi que de les comparer à d’autres produits sur le marché tels que leurs concurrents asiatiques. Les frontières du système comprennent les étapes depuis l’extraction des matières premières, en passant par la production des produits finis ainsi que leur transport sur chantier situé en Belgique. Cette présentation reprend le pourquoi et le comment d’une Analyse du Cycle de Vie, les différentes étapes nécessaires à l’application de l’ACV aux produits en pierre belge ainsi que les principaux résultats. Cette présentation permettra la mise en évidence de l’intérêt de l’ACV et des fiches de déclaration environnementale qui y sont associées ainsi que les perspectives qui peuvent en découler dans le domaine des matériaux et plus précisément pour les matières minérales. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental impact assessment of bio-based binders: from production to industrial applications
Gerbinet, Saïcha ULg; Belboom, Sandra ULg; Briard, Vincent et al

Poster (2015, October 15)

A binder is used to hold together the fibers forming the mineral wool products (see figure 1). These fibers can be produced from sand and recycled glass for glass wool products (see figure 2) or from rock ... [more ▼]

A binder is used to hold together the fibers forming the mineral wool products (see figure 1). These fibers can be produced from sand and recycled glass for glass wool products (see figure 2) or from rock (volcanic rock, typically basalt or dolomite) for stone wool products. Traditionally, the binders used in mineral wool products are based on phenol-formaldehyde. Due to sanitary and environmental considerations and increased focus on indoor air quality, the producers developed new alternative binders. Especially, Knauf Insulation, a worldwide building insulation manufacturer, developed a binder based on plant starch and called ECOSE. In addition of not using added phenol-formaldehyde , this new binder is also supposed to reduce the environmental impacts of Knauf Insulation mineral wools. Moreover, due to its properties, others applications are now considered for ECOSE such as composite wood panels [1]. The aim of this study is to determine the environmental impact of ECOSE and to compare it with more traditional binders using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology. LCA analyzes the environmental aspects and potential impacts associated with all the stages of a product's life. In this type of environmental assessment the energy and material flows for the entire life-cycle are surveyed and analyzed with special attention to possible environmental hazards or human health problems. The ISO 14040 and 14044 norms [2, 3] provide the general guidance for performing an LCA. The LCA methodology is first applied to ECOSE main component: glucose. The presentation will present results for glucose production from cereals starches After that, first ECOSE application, glass mineral wool products will be presented in details, including production process (see figure 3). The modelling of the glass mineral wool production process in LCA software GaBi 6 [4] is then described. One of the model specificity is that it allows to perform LCA of any glass wool products produced in Knauf Insulation plants in Europe. The adaptations to the model to allow studying former glass wool product when using phenol-formaldehyde binders will also be presented such as the advantages of this model. Moreover, preliminary results about ECOSE and phenol-formaldehyde glass wool products are explained. Références [1] Knauf Insulation. [cited 2014; Available from: http://www.knaufinsulation.ua/en. [2] ISO 14044, Environmental management - Life cycle assessment - Requirements and guidelines. 2006. [3] ISO 14040, Environmental management - Life cycle assessment - Principles and framework. 2006. [4] LBP, University of Stuttgart, and PE INTERNATIONAL AG, GaBI 6. 2012: Leinfelden-Echterdingen. p. GaBi 6: Software and database for life cycle engineering. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain trains: scenario development to explore intermodal rail transport expansion in, from and towards Belgium
Troch, Frank; Vanelslander, Thierry; Belboom, Sandra ULg et al

Conference (2015, September)

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See detailBrain Trains: Intermodal Rail Freight Transport and Hinterland Connections - A Swot Analysis to Assess the Belgian Rail Practice
Troch, Frank; Vanelslander, Thierry; Sys, Christa et al

in Proceedings of the IAME Annual Conference 2015 (2015, August)

This paper focuses on transversal research of the role and influences of rail freight transport, as a part of intermodal transport in Belgium. The scope of the research concentrates on port hinterland ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on transversal research of the role and influences of rail freight transport, as a part of intermodal transport in Belgium. The scope of the research concentrates on port hinterland flows. A large SWOT analysis of the current situation is conducted, starting from the actual weak usage of this mode of transport. Five different fields have been identified, impacting the economy and society. Each field indicates critical internal strengths and weaknesses for intermodal rail transportation in Belgium, and identifies possible future developments and setbacks. A Delphi-like approach is used, including a heterogeneous panel of experts discussing and validating the SWOT results. To prioritize the characteristics, a survey on the different SWOT elements was performed, asking the experts to rate each statement on its influence and likelihood of happening (level of uncertainty). [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental impact assessment of rail freight intermodality
Merchan Arribas, Angel ULg; Belboom, Sandra ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Rasouli, Soora; Timmermans, Harry (Eds.) Current issues in transportation research - Proceedings of the BIVEC/GIBET transport research days 2015 (2015, May 28)

The European Commission’s White Paper on transport (European Commission, 2011) seeks to achieve an efficient and sustainable balance between the various transport modes. Environmental impact studies on ... [more ▼]

The European Commission’s White Paper on transport (European Commission, 2011) seeks to achieve an efficient and sustainable balance between the various transport modes. Environmental impact studies on intermodality transport show that rail freight transport is the land-based transport that has a higher environmental performance compared to intermodal road-rail and all-road transport (Fries and Hellweg, 2014), especially when electrified railway is used (Spielmann and Scholz, 2005). Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology allows us to model as best as possible the environmental impacts of several pollutants in numerous categories. For other categories such as accident damages, noise impact and land use, new developments have to be performed. For the environmental impact assessment, all life cycle phases of rail freight transport operation, rail infrastructure, and rail equipment are taken into account (Spielmann et al., 2007). [less ▲]

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See detailBRAIN TRAINS: Intermodal rail freight transport and hinterland connections A SWOT analysis to assess the Belgian rail practice
Troch, Frank; Vanelslander, Thierry; Belboom, Sandra ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, May)

This paper focuses on transversal research of the role and influences of rail freight transport, as a part of intermodal transport in Belgium. A SWOT analysis of the current situation is conducted ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on transversal research of the role and influences of rail freight transport, as a part of intermodal transport in Belgium. A SWOT analysis of the current situation is conducted, starting from the actual weak usage of this mode of transport. Five different fields have been identified, impacting the economy and society. Each field indicates critical internal strengths and weaknesses for intermodal rail transportation in Belgium, and identifies possible future developments and setbacks. A Delphi-like approach is used, including a heterogeneous panel of experts, discussing and validating the SWOT results. To prioritize the characteristics, a survey on the different SWOT elements is performed, asking the experts to rate each statement on its influence and likelihood of happening, indicating the level of uncertainty. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes the production of Belgian bioethanol fit with European requirements on GHG emissions? Case of wheat
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Biomass & Bioenergy (2015), 74

This paper undertakes an environmental evaluation of bioethanol production, using wheat cultivated in Belgium. Cultivation steps are modelled using Belgian specific data. Wheat transformation in ethanol ... [more ▼]

This paper undertakes an environmental evaluation of bioethanol production, using wheat cultivated in Belgium. Cultivation steps are modelled using Belgian specific data. Wheat transformation in ethanol relies on industrial data. GHG emissions of the whole life cycle are calculated and compared with the default values given by the European Renewable Energy Directive. Belgian wheat bioethanol achieves a 5% higher GHG reduction than the one mentioned in the European directive but impact repartition is different with a higher importance of cultivation step in our case. Belgian wheat bioethanol complies with the current sustainability criteria but is also able to conform to further ones. Sensitivity analyses are performed on the importance of N fertilizers and associated emissions known as main important parameters. These analyses reveal non negligible variations and then a range of available GHG reduction when using wheat bioethanol. [less ▲]

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See detailSociety and materials, a series of regular seminars based on a dialog between soft and hard sciences
Birat, Jean-Pierre; Declich, Andrea; Belboom, Sandra ULg et al

in Metallurgical Research & Technology (2015), 112(5),

An informal community has regularly organized annual conferences in Europe since 2007, on the connection between core commodities like materials and society and societal challenges: they are called SAM ... [more ▼]

An informal community has regularly organized annual conferences in Europe since 2007, on the connection between core commodities like materials and society and societal challenges: they are called SAM (Society and Materials). The approach is trans- and multi-disciplinary. Thus, sociologists, historians, architects, political scientists and policymakers, engineers, material scientists, life cycle community experts, business people and philosophers come together each year in cohorts of about 100 people from Europe, but also Asia, America and Africa, to give 30 to 40 presentations. They are made available on the SOVAMAT website (www.sovamat.org) and are published in journals like Revue de Métallurgie, Metallurgical Research & Technology and Matériaux et Techniques: Many kinds of materials are regularly discussed. Until today, the conferences have produced about 350 communications, many of which have been translated into peer-reviewed papers. These series of conferences were launched in order to address the complexity of technology evolution in the context of societal challenges. The intuition was that purely mono-disciplinary approaches would not be sufficient to address the future and that holistic methods like Life Cycle Analysis were still too narrowly focused to lead seamlessly to what was needed. Inviting separate communities to participate turned out to be quite popular and people have been coming back regularly and have attracted new players. The outcome is a mixture of disciplines speaking together, but also of practical proposals alongside methodological, meta- or ontological ones. With the hindsight of 10 years of practical experience, it is clear that the scientific agenda in terms of methodology, which was set at the beginning of the adventure, has been achieved. The paths followed were somewhat different, more empirical and more imaginative, than the initial vision of the organizers: a cluster of approaches was explored, which turned out to be richer than an improved version of LCA and MFA. Moreover, new issues have been raised, which make it likely that the initiative will continue indefinitely. This experience can probably help others find their way forward. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental relevance of end of life vehicle valorisation - LCA of COMET case study
Groslambert, Sylvie ULg; Belboom, Sandra ULg; Lewis, Grégory et al

Conference (2014, November 17)

LCA of Electric Vehicles Recycling : Comparison between three business lines of dismantling

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See detailLife Cycle Analysis (LCA) of photovoltaic panels: A review
Gerbinet, Saïcha ULg; Belboom, Sandra ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (2014), 38

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See detailImportance of LUC and ILUC on the carbon footprint of bioproduct: case of bio-HDPE
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Matériaux et Techniques (2014), 102(2),

Suite à la diminution des ressources fossiles et à l’augmentation des émissions des gaz à effet de serre, des solutions sont nécessaires pour remplacer les produits issus du pétrole. Cela a pour ... [more ▼]

Suite à la diminution des ressources fossiles et à l’augmentation des émissions des gaz à effet de serre, des solutions sont nécessaires pour remplacer les produits issus du pétrole. Cela a pour conséquence une constante augmentation du nombre de produits biobasés développés à partir de ressources agricoles. Cette étude évalue l’empreinte carbone du polyéthylène haute densité (PEHD) produit à partir de canne à sucre brésilienne ou de betterave belge. Le but de cette étude est de comparer l’empreinte carbone du bio-PEHD avec le PEHD fossile en considérant l’effet du changement d’affectation des sols. Les frontières communes des systèmes agricoles regroupent l’étape de culture de la canne à sucre et de la betterave, avec toutes les consommations associées d’énergie et d’engrais, le transport depuis le champ jusqu’à l’unité industrielle, la transformation des plantes sucrières en bioéthanol hydraté, la valorisation des sous-produits, la polymérisation et l’incinération du PEHD. Le scénario fossile comprend la production d’éthylène, sa polymérisation et l’incinération du PEHD. La comparaison du cycle de vie entier des PEHD biobasé et fossile montre des émissions de GES plus faibles avec le produit biobasé, ce qui est l’effet voulu. Ce résultat est uniquement valide s’il n’y pas de changement direct ou indirect d’affectation des sols. Pour évaluer l’impact environnemental de la déforestation ou de la transformation d’un pâturage en champ, les lignes directrices de l’Union Européenne ont été suivies afin de calculer les émissions de CO2 en fonction de divers paramètres. Pour la canne à sucre, le changement direct d’affectation des sols (LUC) est défini par la transformation de pâturages en champs dans la région de Sao Paulo au Brésil. Trois scénarios ont été développés, basés sur différentes pratiques agricoles pour les pâturages et les champs (labour et engrais) : le meilleur, le pire et le moyen. Le meilleur cas engendre un gain environnemental supplémentaire pour le produit biobasé. Le pire et le moyen amènent des émissions complémentaires. Un temps de retour, considérant le temps nécessaire pour récupérer à nouveau un gain environnemental comparativement au produit fossile, a été calculé pour le scenario moyen et s’élève à 12 ans. Le changement indirect d’affectation des sols pour la canne à sucre est modélisé comme étant la transformation d’une forêt en champ induite par les effets du changement direct décrit ci-avant. Le taux de déforestation peut varier entre 16 et 100%, dépendant des statistiques utilisées et entrainant un temps de retour de respectivement 26 et 101 ans. Pour la betterave, aucun changement direct n’est considéré. En effet, aucune expansion des terres agricoles ne peut être envisagée en Belgique au vu des faibles surfaces disponibles. Si une augmentation en termes de production de bioplastiques a lieu, la Belgique devra importer de la betterave provenant des pays voisins, ce qui peut induire un changement indirect d’affectation des sols. Dans cette étude, la betterave est supposée provenir des Pays-Bas. Celle-ci est cultivée sur des pâturages préalablement transformés en champs. Ce scénario moyen induit un temps de retour de 8 ans. Cette étude a mis en évidence l’importance du changement direct et indirect d’affectation des sols, spécialement pour les cultures énergétiques dédiées au remplacement des produits fossiles. Cet effet peut renverser les résultats attendus et engendrer de longs temps de retour. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental Product Declaration of purified and defluorinated phosphoric acid – difficulties and limitations of the methodology
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Szöcs, Carl; Léonard, Angélique ULg

Poster (2013, November)

The awareness of environment and the development of environmental product declarations (EPDs) are increasing through years. EPD becomes a need for producers in both B to B and B to C relations. EPD ... [more ▼]

The awareness of environment and the development of environmental product declarations (EPDs) are increasing through years. EPD becomes a need for producers in both B to B and B to C relations. EPD elaboration process is not without difficulties. Such a declaration requires a considerable amount of time and information, a full comprehension of the applied methodology but it also causes confidentiality problems. All these difficulties can lead to the use of simpler tools, as Carbon Footprint, which only focuses on a single impact and misses a part of the message. This case study is based on the production of phosphoric acid in Belgium using PCR for inorganic chemicals. It takes into account the use of raw materials as phosphate rocks or chemicals, their transportation to site and the manufacturing of defluorinated and purified phosphoric acid. This process also requires steam, electricity, demineralised water and sulphuric acid. These inputs are produced on site and their modelling is taken into account in this study. The first step of this process is the production of weak phosphoric acid with transformation of phosphate rocks into 30% phosphoric acid using sulphuric acid attack. The particularity of this process is the production, in this company, of a recoverable coproduct, called gypsum. The amount of this product is about 1.6 t per t of weak acid. A stoichiometric relation connects both products and is used as allocation factor, as recommended by the PCR. Through next concentration steps, fluosilicic acid is produced, also linked to the production of phosphoric acid by a stoichiometric relation. For facilities production plant, repartition of impact between coproducts is not so easy. As mentioned before, the production of steam, electricity, demineralised water and sulphuric acid are performed on site. Sulphuric acid is produced by the combustion of liquid sulphur provided by oil refineries. Two different units produce both sulphuric acid and steam through the combustion of liquid sulphur but only one of them transforms a part of steam into electricity. Repartition of impact between sulphuric acid and steam can be achieved using a physical relation based on thermodynamic values which can be transformed into mass relation. For repartition between electricity, steam and sulphuric acid, the main difficulty is that electricity does not have a weight and a transformation into steam shall be achieved to use the same relationship that previously. This way of allocating is not very obvious for producers, even if it is the one recommended by the PCR. As electricity and steam are coproduced, an energetic allocation is also relevant and gives completely opposite results for repartition of impact of each product. In that case, sulphuric acid impact achieves a non-negligible part of the impact which modifies greatly results of phosphoric acid production. This is a problem when you know that environmental product declarations are used to compare products on environmental criteria, using mainly values of climate change or energy impacts. Producers are then reticent to publish such a value which can lead to a loss of customer confidence, even more when they occupy a leading position on the market and taking into account that a comparison with other producers is quite impossible. More specific guidelines should be set to indicate the best way to perform an environmental product declaration in specific fields using a specific way of allocation. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes Belgian bioethanol comply with European Renewable Energy Directive ?
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

Poster (2013, November)

The craze for biofuels has increased in recent years mainly to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel consumptions. The European Renewable Energy Directive (RED), published in 2009, defined ... [more ▼]

The craze for biofuels has increased in recent years mainly to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel consumptions. The European Renewable Energy Directive (RED), published in 2009, defined guidelines to assess carbon footprint of a biofuel depending on biomass source. It also provided generic values of GHG emissions relative to each step of the life cycle taking into account all steps from the cultivation to the end-of-life. These values are used to evaluate the sustainability of European biofuels depending on the used crops and the used transformation technology. This study, based on local crops cultivated in Belgium (sugar beet and wheat), compares specific Belgian values with European generic ones. Belgium yields for both crops are among the best of the continent. Specific Belgian values for fertilizers and pesticides are used. The transformation of wheat into bioethanol is modelled using industrial data. As recommended by the RED, no land use change is taken into account for Belgium. Greenhouse gas emissions induce by the life cycle of Belgium sugar beet bioethanol are similar to the ones mentioned in the European directive but impact repartition is different. In our case, the transformation step achieves a higher part of the impact. That can be explained by the higher cultivation yield. Belgian wheat bioethanol obtains better results than those mentioned by the European directive with a 9% higher reduction. Cultivation step is the major step for this impact. Importance of fertilizers consumptions and associated emissions are highlighted. The comparison of both bioethanols impacts for climate change category, using an energy basis, shows that wheat allows a higher reduction of GHG emissions than sugar beet. If the comparison is performed on a cultivated area basis, results are reversed and sugar beet achieves a twofold reduction compared with wheat. Sensitivity analyses are performed on the importance of N fertilizers and associated emissions and on energy consumptions relative to the transformation step. These analyses reveal non-negligible impact variations. A range of GHG reduction that can be reached using Belgian sugar beet and wheat bioethanol are then calculated. In any case, sugar beet does not achieve the amount of reduction given by the RED, while the opposite effect is shown for wheat with a reduction at least as high as the RED default value. These results indicate the importance of make use of specific values to assess the sustainability of bioethanol for a specific country using a specific crop and a specific technology. Further measurements and research about emission factors due to fertilizers application could improve the accuracy of our results. [less ▲]

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