References of "Beerens, Dominique"
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See detailBlood Oxygen Binding in Double-Muscled Calves and Dairy Calves with Conventional Muscle Conformation
Cambier, Carole ULg; Clerbaux, T.; Detry, B. et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (2000), 61(3), 299-304

OBJECTIVE: To assess in vivo blood oxygen binding in double-muscled calves and dairy calves with conventional muscle conformation. ANIMALS: 58 dairy and 48 double-muscled calves. PROCEDURE: Calves were ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To assess in vivo blood oxygen binding in double-muscled calves and dairy calves with conventional muscle conformation. ANIMALS: 58 dairy and 48 double-muscled calves. PROCEDURE: Calves were classified as neonatal (24 hours old) or older calves (2 to 26 days old). Venous and arterial blood samples were collected, and hemoglobin concentration, pH, PCO2, and PO2 were determined. Blood oxygen equilibrium curves (OEC) under standard conditions were constructed, and the oxygen exchange fraction (OEF) and the amount of oxygen released at the tissue level by 100 ml of blood (OEF Vol%) were calculated. RESULTS: In each breed, partial pressure of oxygen at 50% saturation of hemoglobin (P50) under standard conditions was significantly higher in older than in neonatal calves, indicating a right shift in OEC with age. Venous P50 was significantly lower in neonatal double-muscled calves than in neonatal dairy calves, but arterial and venous P50 were significantly higher in older double-muscled calves than in older dairy calves. In double-muscled, but not in dairy, calves, OEF was significantly higher in older than in neonatal calves. In neonatal calves, OEF Vol% was not significantly different between breeds, but OEF Vol% was significantly higher in older double-muscled calves than in older dairy calves. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The lower OEF in neonatal double-muscled calves, compared with dairy calves, could contribute to the higher sensitivity of double-muscled calves to hypoxia. Blood oxygen affinity decreased with age, but OEF and OEF Vol% were unchanged with age in dairy calves, whereas they increased with age in double-muscled calves [less ▲]

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See detailRole of Substance P and Tachykinin Receptor Antagonists in Citric Acid-Induced Cough in Pigs
Moreaux, B.; Nemmar, A.; Vincke, G. et al

in European Journal of Pharmacology (2000), 408(3), 305-312

The purpose of this work was to investigate the role of tachykinins in cough induced by citric acid (0.8 M) in pigs. With this object, we have studied the effect of citric acid on substance P content in ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this work was to investigate the role of tachykinins in cough induced by citric acid (0.8 M) in pigs. With this object, we have studied the effect of citric acid on substance P content in the tracheo-bronchial tree and the effects of substance P and of tachykinin receptor antagonists on citric acid-induced cough. Citric acid exposure significantly increased substance P concentration in both broncho-alveolar and tracheal lavage fluids, while it decreased significantly the substance P content in tracheal mucosa. Substance P did not elicit cough, but significantly potentiated the citric acid-induced cough frequency. Tachykinin NK(1), NK(2) or NK(3) receptor antagonists, SR 140333 (nolpitantium), SR 48968 (saredutant) and SR 142801 (osanetant), respectively, significantly inhibited citric acid-induced cough. The same inhibitory effect of tachykinin receptor antagonists was observed, when substance P was nebulised before citric acid challenge. We conclude that citric acid induces in pigs a release of substance P in the tracheo-bronchial tree, which plays a sensitising role on the cough reflex. The involvement of tachykinin NK(1), NK(2), NK(3) receptors are also demonstrated in this reflex. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibiting Effect of Ammonia on Citric Acid-Induced Cough in Pigs: A Possible Involvement of Substance P
Moreaux, B.; Nemmar, A.; Beerens, Dominique ULg et al

in Pharmacology & Toxicology (2000), 87(6), 279-285

The effect of ammonia on the cough response to citric acid and on substance P release from C-fibers involved in this reflex was assessed. For a period from one to four days, piglets were exposed, in an ... [more ▼]

The effect of ammonia on the cough response to citric acid and on substance P release from C-fibers involved in this reflex was assessed. For a period from one to four days, piglets were exposed, in an inhalation chamber, to ammonia at a concentration of 15 or 30 ppm. During exposure, cough induction tests were done every two days. Recovery of the cough reflex after ammonia exposure was also determined. In a separate group of piglets exposed for 2 days to 30 ppm ammonia, substance P content was determined in bronchial and tracheal lavage fluids and in the tracheal and bronchial mucosa. Ammonia (30 ppm) was found to inhibit coughing significantly (the cough frequency was reduced by 64%) after a two-day exposure. In animals exposed for 4 days to this ammonia concentration, the recovery ranged from 3 to 7 days (mean: 5 days). The same ammonia concentration also caused the substance P content to increase significantly in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (to 432% of its initial value) and tracheal lavage fluid (to 149%) and to decrease significantly in the tracheal mucosa (-58%), however the content in bronchial mucosa was not significantly affected (-43%). Exposure to 15 ppm ammonia had no effect on the frequency of citric acid-induced coughing. In conclusion, ammonia inhibits citric acid-induced coughing in pigs at concentrations that can be detected in piggeries. This inhibitory effect may be related to substance-P depletion in C-fiber endings [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Inhalation of Dust and Endotoxin on Respiratory Tracts of Pigs
Urbain, B.; Mast, J.; Beerens, Dominique ULg et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (1999), 60(9), 1055-1060

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of inhalation of feed flour dust and dustborne endotoxin on respiratory tracts of pigs. ANIMALS: 29 healthy Belgian Landrace pigs. PROCEDURE: Pigs housed in an ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of inhalation of feed flour dust and dustborne endotoxin on respiratory tracts of pigs. ANIMALS: 29 healthy Belgian Landrace pigs. PROCEDURE: Pigs housed in an environmental chamber were exposed for 6 days to feed flour dust (1 to 15 mg/m3) and dustborne endotoxins (50 to 2,500 ng/m3). Effects were evaluated by measuring albumin concentration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, cell composition of nasal lavage (NL) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and blood, and percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in blood and lavage fluids. Dustborne endotoxin was obtained by mixing endotoxins from Escherichia coli (serotype O127:B8) with feed flour before spraying the flour in the environmental chamber. RESULTS: Exposure did not affect cell composition of NL fluid or blood. Total cell counts of BAL fluids were increased in all groups exposed to dust. Macrophage counts were increased in pigs exposed to inhalable dust concentrations as low as 4.4 mg/m3, and lymphocyte counts were increased in groups exposed to high dust concentrations. Percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in blood and lavage fluids were unchanged. In all dust-exposed groups, albumin content of BAL fluid was increased, whereas LDH activity was unaffected. Macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration and edema in the bronchi were identified by light microscopy. Effects attributable to E. coli endotoxin exposure were not identified. CONCLUSIONS: Inhalation of feed flour dust did not affect nasal mucosa but did induce bronchial airway inflammation. Dustborne endotoxins did not have effects attributable to endotoxin alone. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of a Cough Induction Test in Pigs: Effects of Sr 48968 and Enalapril
Moreaux, B.; Beerens, Dominique ULg; Gustin, Pascal ULg

in Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (1999), 22(6), 387-389

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See detailEffects of Hyperchloremia on Blood Oxygen Binding in Healthy Calves
Cambier, Carole ULg; Detry, B.; Beerens, Dominique ULg et al

in Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) (1998), 85(4), 1267-1272

Three different levels of hyperchloremia were induced in healthy Friesian calves to study the effects of chloride on blood oxygen transport. By infusion, the calves received either 5 ml/kg of 0.9% NaCl ... [more ▼]

Three different levels of hyperchloremia were induced in healthy Friesian calves to study the effects of chloride on blood oxygen transport. By infusion, the calves received either 5 ml/kg of 0.9% NaCl (low-level hyperchloremia; group A), 5 ml/kg of 7.5% NaCl (moderate hyperchloremia; group B), or 7.5 ml/kg of 7.5% NaCl (high-level hyperchloremia; group C). Blood was sampled from the jugular vein and the brachial artery. Chloride concentration, hemoglobin content, arterial and venous pH, PCO2, and PO2 were determined. At each time point (0, 15, 30, 60, and 120 min), the whole blood oxygen equilibrium curve (OEC) was measured under standard conditions. In groups B and C, hyperchloremia was accompanied by a sustained rightward shift of the OEC, as indicated by the significant increase in the standard PO2 at 50% hemoglobin saturation. Infusion of hypertonic saline also induced relative acidosis. The arterial and venous OEC were calculated, with body temperature, pH, and PCO2 values in arterial and venous blood taken into account. The degree of blood desaturation between the arterial and the venous compartments [O2 exchange fraction (OEF%)] and the amount of oxygen released at tissue level by 100 ml of bovine blood (OEF vol%) were calculated from the arterial and venous OEC combined with the PO2 and hemoglobin concentration. The chloride-induced rightward shift of the OEC was reinforced by the relative acidosis, but the altered PO2 values combined with the lower hemoglobin concentration explained the absence of any significant difference in OEF (% and vol%). We conclude that infusion of hypertonic saline induces hyperchloremia and acidemia, which can explain the OEC rightward shift observed in arterial and peripheral venous blood. [less ▲]

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See detailA Morphometric and Functional Study of the Toxicity of Atmospheric Ammonia in the Extrathoracic Airways in Pigs
Urbain, B.; Gustin, Pascal ULg; Charlier, G. et al

in Veterinary Research Communications (1996), 20(4), 381-399

The effects of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) on the nasal and tracheal mucosa of pigs were investigated by morphometric and functional methods. Pigs were exposed to four concentrations of NH3 [5 (control), 25 ... [more ▼]

The effects of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) on the nasal and tracheal mucosa of pigs were investigated by morphometric and functional methods. Pigs were exposed to four concentrations of NH3 [5 (control), 25, 50 and 100 ppm] for 6 days in a specially designed air-pollutant exposure chamber. Samples were taken from the turbinates and the trachea, and the respiratory mucosa was examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. Dose-response curves to carbachol and isoproterenol were constructed using isolated strips of tracheal smooth muscle, with or without epithelium. In pigs exposed to ammonia, considerable mucosal injuries were observed in the turbinates but not in the trachea. The number of neutrophils in the epithelial layer and in the lamina propria, and epithelial hyperplasia were closely and significantly correlated with the concentrations of ammonia (r = 0.894, p < 0.001; r = 0.727, P < 0.001; and r = 0.818, p < 0.001, respectively). Except for the lamina propria, all these changes were significant (p < 0.05) at ammonia concentrations as low as 25 ppm. The percentage of the surface of the turbinate mucosa that was ciliated tended to decrease with increasing ammonia concentration (r = 0.439, p < 0.082). Ammonia induced smooth-muscle hyperresponsiveness to carbachol with a close linear correlation between individual values of the carbachol-induced maximal effect and the NH3 concentrations (r = 0.526, p < 0.003). While mechanical destruction of the epithelium induced an increase in Emax in the control group, no difference was observed between the intact and denuded strips from animals exposed to ammonia. The response to isoproterenol was not influenced by ammonia. It was concluded that quantitative histological analysis of the inflammatory infiltration and epithelial hyperplasia in the turbinates is a useful tool for quantifying the effects of atmospheric pollutants in pigs; a 6-day exposure to ammonia induces nasal irritation and functional disturbances of the tracheal smooth-muscle contractions at concentrations as low as 25 ppm [less ▲]

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See detailChronic Exposure of Pigs to Airborne Dust and Endotoxins in an Environmental Chamber: Technical Note
Urbain, B.; Prouvost, J. F.; Beerens, Dominique ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (1996), 27(6), 569-578

A new experimental setup was developed to expose pigs to dust and airborne endotoxins in an environmental chamber, at levels liable to be encountered in pig farm buildings. The following parameters were ... [more ▼]

A new experimental setup was developed to expose pigs to dust and airborne endotoxins in an environmental chamber, at levels liable to be encountered in pig farm buildings. The following parameters were evaluated in a chamber containing two pigs of 10 kg body-weight: inhalable and respirable dust gravimetric concentrations were measured using area samplers and expressed as mg/m3. The respirable dust concentration was also measured using a "TM digital microP respirable dust-measuring instrument', which has been shown to give similar results to the gravimetric method. The endotoxin concentration was evaluated using the Limulus-assay and expressed as ng/m3 of air containing the inhalable or respirable dust or as ng/mg of inhalable and respirable dust. Feed flour dust was introduced into the chamber to obtain different concentrations of inhalable and respirable dust ranging from 3.62 to 76.66 mg/m3 and from 0.24 to 1.40 mg/m3, respectively. The endotoxin concentration was modulated by mixing the feed flour with Escherichia coli endotoxins before blowing it into the chamber. The endotoxin concentrations in the air containing inhalable or respirable dust ranged from 28.9 to 270.0 ng/m3 and from 2.22 to 36.38 ng/m3, respectively, depending on the amount of endotoxins added to the dust. Data were also obtained in a piggery. The experimental setup detailed in this paper could be used to study the significance of air contaminants in the development of pig respiratory diseases. [less ▲]

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