References of "Baudoux, Etienne"
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See detailImpact of co-transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells on lung function after unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following non-myeloablative conditioning
MOERMANS, Catherine ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg; BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg et al

in Transplantation (in press)

Background: In the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used to promote engraftment and prevent graft- versus-host-disease. However, in animal ... [more ▼]

Background: In the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used to promote engraftment and prevent graft- versus-host-disease. However, in animal models, MSC were shown to cause pulmonary alterations after systemic administration. The impact of MSC infusion on lung function has not been studied in humans. The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of MSC co-infusion on lung function and airway inflammation as well as on the incidence of pulmonary infections and cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation after HSCT. Methods: We have prospectively followed 30 patients who underwent unrelated HSCT with MSC co-infusion after non-myeloablative conditioning (NMA). Each patient underwent detailed lung function testing (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, RV, TLC, DLCO and KCO) and measurement of exhaled nitric oxide before HSCT and 3, 6 and 12 months posttransplant. The incidence of pulmonary infections and CMV reactivation were also monitored. This group was compared with another group of 28 patients who underwent the same type of transplantation but without MSC co-infusion. Results: Lung function tests did not show important modifications over time and did not differ between the MSC and control groups. There was a higher 1-year incidence of infection, particularly of fungal infections, in patients having received a MSC co-infusion. There was no difference between groups regarding the 1-year incidence of CMV reactivation. Conclusions: MSC co-infusion does not induce pulmonary deterioration 1 year after HSCT with NMA conditioning. MSC appear to be safe for the lung but close monitoring of pulmonary infections remains essential. [less ▲]

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See detailContrôle de qualité des USP via segments attachés : recommandations de la SFGM-TC
De Vos, John; Birebent, B; Faucher, Catherine et al

in Pathologie et Biologie (2014)

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See detailModalités de conservation et de destruction des produits cellulaires cryopréservés : recommandations de la SFGM-TC
CALMELS, ; Boulanger, F; BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg et al

in Pathologie et Biologie (2014), 62(3),

Thousands of autologous and at less extent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) bags are cryopreserved in France. The majority of autologous HSC grafts are used within a year after collection ... [more ▼]

Thousands of autologous and at less extent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) bags are cryopreserved in France. The majority of autologous HSC grafts are used within a year after collection. However, many bags are still unused and cryopreserved for many years. In France and on a European scale, the ever-growing number of cryopreserved bags represents a real economic health concern. Indeed, the cost of storage is about 100 € per bag and per year. In addition, quality and therapeutic value of these long-term cryopreserved grafts needs to be evaluated. In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies (SFGM-TC) set up its fourth annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from its member centers across France. These workshops took place in September 2013 in Lille. In this article, we addressed the issue of the destruction of long-term cryopreserved grafts be them autologous or allogeneic and provide recommendations regarding their destruction. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of clinical-grade enriched regulatory T cells delays experimental xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease
Hannon, Muriel ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg; Lucas, Sophie et al

in Transfusion (2014), 54(February), 353-363

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See detailCORD DONOR Safety
BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg; Lefebvre, Caroline ULg; FASTH, Anders

Conference (2014, May 16)

As for any cell donation, donor safety parameters must be included in the design of cord blood (CB) collection procedures. Until recently, CB donation has been regarded as a relatively safe procedure, and ... [more ▼]

As for any cell donation, donor safety parameters must be included in the design of cord blood (CB) collection procedures. Until recently, CB donation has been regarded as a relatively safe procedure, and practices have evolved from the early stages of CB banking to make reasonable provisions to protect mothers and infant donors from harm linked to CB donation: informed consent, exclusion of complicated pregnancies and deliveries, as well as of pre-term births, non-interference with obstetrical practices, use of trained staff for CB collection, standardized aseptic collection practices, donation limited to single births. Besides, professional standards foresee careful record keeping of clinical side effects that may occur in the course of CB collection. Since 2011 time to cord clamping has become a concern in the light of publications on iron depletion and post natal outcome, including neurological development, and linked to early or late cord clamping at birth. As data show benefits of late clamping in low birth weight infants in terms of anemia and iron stores, it now admitted by professional organizations to delay cord clamping for 1 minute after birth, especially for pre-term births. However, in full term births after uncomplicated pregnancy, that are the target population for CB donation, there is no clear indication to confirm or refute benefits of late clamping. In some countries, sometimes emotional awareness has increased about optimal timing of cord clamping, leading to some resistance to CB donation and to questioning of the harmless reputation of CB donation. CB banking professionals however have not changed their recommendations, leaving up to obstetrical teams the decision to collect or not, after risk benefit assessment. However, CB bankers remain with the duty of providing transparent and up to date information to mothers, as well as of setting up accurate policies regarding informed consent. [less ▲]

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See detailThinking out of the box - New approaches to controlling GVHD
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Humblet-Baron, Stéphanie; Ehx, Grégory ULg et al

in Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports (2014), 9

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major limitation of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Despite major advances in the understanding of GVHD pathogenesis, standard GVHD ... [more ▼]

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major limitation of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Despite major advances in the understanding of GVHD pathogenesis, standard GVHD prophylaxis regimens continue to bebased on the combination of a calcineurin inhibitor with an antimetabolite, while first line treatmentsstill relies on high-dose corticosteroids. Further, no second line treatment has emerged thus far in acute or chronic GVHD patients who failed on corticosteroids. After briefly reviewing current standards of GVHD prevention and treatment, this article will discuss recent approaches that might change GVHD prophylaxis / treatment in the next decades, with a special focus on recently developed immunoregulatory strategies based on infusion of mesenchymal stromal or regulatory T-cells, or on injection of lowdose interleukin-2. [less ▲]

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See detailCord blood banking Introduction-State of the art
BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg

in Gluckman, Eliane; Cavazzana (Eds.) World Cord blood congress IV and innovative therapies for sickle cell disease (2013, October 25)

Since the early years 1990 when the first cord blood (CB) banks were created, the worldwide inventory has grown considerably to a current 590 thousand units that complement the 22 M donors to provide ... [more ▼]

Since the early years 1990 when the first cord blood (CB) banks were created, the worldwide inventory has grown considerably to a current 590 thousand units that complement the 22 M donors to provide hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) to patients in need of an allogeneic transplantation. The existing inventory shows a high degree of heterogeneity with a significant number of units below the current transplantation standards for adult patients. In the mean time, the use of CB as a HPC source has remained steady over the last years, leading to a relative decrease in the release activity in each individual bank. New challenges and innovations have emerged, such as: • More stringent regulations in the USA and in the EU • Upgrades in professional standards • Competing transplantation approaches such as easier access to adult unrelated donors (UD), use of haplo identical donors, single or multiple CB transplantation • CB collection safety becoming a concern since issues have been raised about the outcome of newborns linked to their iron status • The definition of clear criteria for transplant selection (HLA typing level, cell contents) • Potential role of CB banks in non hematological CB use (use of CB byproducts, generation of iPS from selected universal donors, immunotherapy, HIV therapy) • Financial restrictions The elements mentioned above have lead banking strategies, including recruitment, donor selection, CB collection, processing, storage and release to evolve considerably and to incorporate • Active volunteer accreditation processes for international recognition • Donor recruitment: more detailed and selective donor evaluation • Systematic nucleic acid (NAT) testing for infectious disease markers (IDM) • Extensive use of molecular HLA typing and widening range of loci to be taken into account • Evolving definition of acceptance criteria for incoming CB units, (i.e. stricter TNC requirements) • Well standardized processing and storage methods • Evaluation and adaptation of supply vs. needs in strategic approaches • Need to increase and optimize CB visibility through up to date electronic solutions • Methods to have a permanent and up to date overview of post transplantation outcomes, including elements relevant to the banking and clinical side Professional organizations (NetCord, WMDA, FACT, WBMT) are in the process of tightening their links in order to increase interactions and respond in time to upcoming challenges and evolutions of the field. [less ▲]

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See detailCord Blood Banking: Cord blood management and evaluation: International networking
Van Beckhoven, Jacqueline; BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg; Duffy, Merry et al

in Bart, Thomas; Hwang, William; Boo, Michael (Eds.) A gift for life, WMDA handbook for blood stem cell donation (2013)

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See detailINFUSION OF THIRD-PARTY MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS (MSC) AFTER KIDNEY AND LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: A PHASE I-II, OPEN-LABEL, CLINICAL STUDY (EudraCT 2011-001822-81 & NCT01429038)
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

Poster (2013, May 30)

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC ... [more ▼]

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC infusion after cadaveric kidney and liver transplantation in a prospective phase I-II study, taking advantage of our centre expertise and experience in MSC use in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation and using an already functioning GMP-compliant laboratory producing clinical-grade MSC. Secondary end-points will help to evaluate the immunosuppressive potential of MSC after organ transplantation, and the opportunity to develop larger randomised, controlled, phase III trials. After successful transplantation, 10 liver and 10 kidney transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (tacrolimus, MMF, steroids) will receive an intravenous infusion of 1.5-3x106/kg of third-party MSC on post-operative day 3±2. These patients will be prospectively compared to 10 liver and 10 kidney recipients who meet the inclusion criteria but deny MSC infusion. Safety will be assessed by recording side effects, including opportunistic infections and cancers. Immunosuppressive potential will be evaluated by rejection episode rates, by graft/patient survivals, by immunohistology of 3-months kidney and 6-month liver graft biopsies and by in vitro evaluation of the immunity profile of the recipients. In a second step, reduction (kidney) and progressive weaning (liver) of immunosuppression will be attempted in recipients who received MSC. This ongoing study is supported by research grants from the CHU of Liège, University of Liège, and by the Senior Clinical Research Grant from ESOT. The first patients were included and treated in early 2012, and final results expected in late 2013. [less ▲]

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See detailCleanrooms and tissue banking how happy I could be with either GMP or GTP?
Klykens, J; Pirnay, JP; Verbeken, G et al

in Cell and Tissue Banking (2013)

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See detailEffect of HLA-matching recipients to donor non-inherited maternal antigens on outcomes after mismatched umbilical cord blood transplantation for hematologic malignancy
Rocha, V; Spellman, S; Zhang, MJ et al

in Biology of Blood & Marrow Transplantation (2012)

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See detailInfusion of third party mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) after kidney and liver transplantation: a phase I-II, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

Conference (2012, October 19)

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC ... [more ▼]

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC infusion after cadaveric kidney and liver transplantation in a prospective phase I-II study, taking advantage of our centre expertise and experience in MSC use in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation and using an already functioning GMP-compliant laboratory producing clinical-grade MSC. Secondary end-points will help to evaluate the immunosuppressive potential of MSC after organ transplantation, and the opportunity to develop larger randomised, controlled, phase III trials. After successful transplantation, 10 liver and 10 kidney transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (tacrolimus, MMF, steroids) will receive an intravenous infusion of 1.5-3x106/kg of third-party MSC on post-operative day 3±2. These patients will be prospectively compared to 10 liver and 10 kidney recipients who meet the inclusion criteria but deny MSC infusion. Safety will be assessed by recording side effects, including opportunistic infections and cancers. Immunosuppressive potential will be evaluated by rejection episode rates, by graft/patient survivals, by immunohistology of 3-months kidney and 6-month liver graft biopsies and by in vitro evaluation of the immunity profile of the recipients. In a second step, reduction (kidney) and progressive weaning (liver) of immunosuppression will be attempted in recipients who received MSC. This ongoing study is supported by research grants from the CHU of Liège, University of Liège, and by the Senior Clinical Research Grant from ESOT. The first patients were included and treated in early 2012, and final results expected in late 2013. [less ▲]

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See detailCord blood for allogeneic use: Clinical and scientific aspects?
BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg; BEGUIN, Yves ULg; Benoit, Yves et al

Report (2012)

In this science-policy advisory report, the Superior Health Council issues advice on cord blood as an allogeneic source of stem cells for human clinical use

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See detailBeware of the commercialization of human cells and tissues: situation in the European Union
PIRNAY, JP; ECTORS, N; DELLOYE, C et al

in Cell and Tissue Banking (2012)

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See detailDonor and stem cell source selection
BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg

Learning material (2012)

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See detailFamily-directed umbilical cord blood banking.
GLUCKMAN, E; ROCHA, V; BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg et al

in Haematologica (2011), 96(11), 1700-17007

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See detailAutologous cord blood use: Clinical and scientific aspects
Angenon, Elyane; BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg; BEGUIN, Yves ULg et al

Report (2011)

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See detailCotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cells might prevent death from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) without abrogating graft-versus-tumor effects after HLA-mismatched allogeneic transplantation following nonmyeloablative conditioning.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Lechanteur, Chantal ULg; Willems, Evelyne ULg et al

in Biology of Blood & Marrow Transplantation (2010), 16(6), 838-47

Recent studies have suggested that coinfusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) the day of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) might promote engraftment and prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have suggested that coinfusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) the day of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) might promote engraftment and prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after myeloablative allogeneic HCT. This prompted us to investigate in a pilot study whether MSC infusion before HCT could allow nonmyeloablative (NMA) HCT (a transplant strategy based nearly exclusively on graft-versus-tumor effects for tumor eradication) from HLA-mismatched donors to be performed safely. Twenty patients with hematologic malignancies were given MSCs from third party unrelated donors 30-120 minutes before peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors, after conditioning with 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) and fludarabine. The primary endpoint was safety, defined as a 100-day incidence of nonrelapse mortality (NRM) <35%. One patient had primary graft rejection, whereas the remaining 19 patients had sustained engraftment. The 100-day cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD (aGVHD) was 35%, whereas 65% of the patients experienced moderate/severe chronic GVHD (cGVHD). One-year NRM (10%), relapse (30%), overall survival (OS) (80%) and progression-free survival (PFS) (60%), and 1-year incidence of death from GVHD or infection with GVHD (10%) were encouraging. These figures compare favorably with those observed in a historic group of 16 patients given HLA-mismatched PBSCs (but no MSCs) after NMA conditioning, which had a 1-year incidence of NRM of 37% (P = .02), a 1-year incidence of relapse of 25% (NS), a 1-year OS and PFS of 44% (P = .02), and 38% (P = .1), respectively, and a 1-year rate of death from GVHD or infection with GVHD of 31% (P = .04). In conclusion, our data suggest that HLA-mismatched NMA HCT with MSC coinfusion appeared to be safe. [less ▲]

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See detailCo-transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells might mitigate acute GvHD without abrogating graftversus- tumour alloreactivity after allogeneic transplantation with non-myeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; WILLEMS, Evelyne ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

Conference (2009)

Background: Results of nonmyeloablative HCT in pts with HLA-mismatched donors have been disappointing due to high incidence of graft rejection and severe acute GVHD. Recent studies have suggested that ... [more ▼]

Background: Results of nonmyeloablative HCT in pts with HLA-mismatched donors have been disappointing due to high incidence of graft rejection and severe acute GVHD. Recent studies have suggested that infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) the day of HCT might promote engraftment and prevent acute GVHD after myeloablative allogeneic HCT. However, some studies suggested that MSC co-infusion might abrogate graft-versus-host alloreactivity and graft-versus-tumor effects. This prompted us to investigate whether MSC infusion a few hours before HCT could allow nonmyeloablative HCT from HLA-mismatched donors to be performed safely (i.e. with a 100-day incidence of nonrelapse mortality < 35%). Methods: 20 patients with hematological malignancies were given MSC (1-2 x 10E6 cells/kg) from third party donors a few hours before PBSC from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors, after conditioning with 2 Gy TBI and fl udarabine 90 mg/m. Postgrafting immunosuppression included tacrolimus (day -3 to +180; tapered by day +365) and mycophenolate mofetil (tid days 0 to +42). HLA-compatibility was assessed at the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRBI and DQBI loci: 13 pairs were mismatched for at least one HLA class I antigen (including 4 pairs who were also mismatched for 1 HLA-class II antigens (n=3) or 1 HLA-class I allele (n=1)), 1 pair was mismatched for 2 HLA class II alleles, while 6 pairs were mismatched for a single HLA class I (n=3) or HLA class II (n=3) alleles. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 288 (range, 76-571) days. One patient with secondary AML had primary graft rejection, while the remaining 19 patients had sustained engraftment. Median donor T-cell chimerism levels on days 28, 100, 180 and 365 after HCT were 90%, 98%, 96%, and 98%, respectively. Grade II, III and IV acute GVHD were seen in 5, 2 and 1 patients, respectively, while 7 experienced NIH moderate/severe chronic GVHD. Three of 7 patients with measurable disease at transplantation achieved complete remission on days 41, 104 and 353 after HCT. Two patients died of nonrelapse causes on days 74 and 114 after HCT, while 3 died of disease progression. Projected 1-yr overall and progressionfree survivals were 77% and 61%, respectively. Conclusions: HLA-mismatched nonmyeloablative HCT with MSC co-infusion appeared to be safe, with MSC co-infusion possibly mitigating graft-versus-host alloreactivity without abrogating graft-versus-tumor effects. Survival is encouraging. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-myeloablative transplantation with CD8-depleted or unmanipulated peripheral blood stem cells: a phase II randomized trial.
Willems, Evelyne ULg; Baron, Frédéric ULg; Baudoux, Etienne ULg et al

in Leukemia : Official Journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K (2009), 23(3), 608-10

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (38 ULg)