References of "Bastin, Jean-François"
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See detailAboveground biomass mapping of African forest mosaics using canopy texture analysis: towards a regional approach.
Bastin, Jean-François ULg; Barbier, Nicolas; Couteron, Pierre et al

in Ecological Applications (in press)

In the context of the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions caused by deforestation and forest degradation (the REDD+ program), optical very high resolution (VHR) satellite images provide an opportunity ... [more ▼]

In the context of the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions caused by deforestation and forest degradation (the REDD+ program), optical very high resolution (VHR) satellite images provide an opportunity to characterize forest canopy structure and to quantify aboveground biomass (AGB) at less expense than methods based on airborne remote sensing data. Among the methods for processing these VHR images, Fourier textural ordination (FOTO) presents a good potential to detect forest canopy structural heterogeneity and therefore to predict AGB variations. Notably, the method does not saturate at intermediate AGB values as do pixelwise processing of available space borne optical and radar signals. However, a regional scale application requires to overcome two difficulties: (i) instrumental effects due to variations in sun-scene-sensor geometry or sensor-specific responses that preclude the use of wide arrays of images acquired under heterogeneous conditions and (ii) forest structural diversity including monodominant or open canopy forests, which are of particular importance in Central Africa. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of a rigorous regional study of canopy texture by harmonizing FOTO indices of images acquired from two different sensors (Geoeye-1 and QuickBird-2) and different sun-scene-sensor geometries and by calibrating a piecewise biomass inversion model using 26 inventory plots (1 ha) sampled across very heterogeneous forest types. A good agreement was found between observed and predicted AGB (RSE=15%; R²=0.85; p-value<0.001) across a wide range of AGB levels from 26 Mg/ha to 460 Mg/ha, and was confirmed by cross validation. A high-resolution biomass map (100 m pixels) was produced for a 400 km² area, and predictions obtained from both imagery sources were consistent with each other (r=0.86; slope=1.03; intercept=12.01 Mg/ha). These results highlight the horizontal structure of forest canopy as a powerful descriptor of the entire forest stand structure and heterogeneity. In particular, we show that quantitative metrics resulting from such textural analysis offer new opportunities to characterize the spatial and temporal variation of the structure of dense forests and may complement the toolbox used by tropical forest ecologists, managers or REDD+ national monitoring, reporting and verification bodies. [less ▲]

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See detailNest grouping patterns of bonobos (Pan paniscus) in relation to fruit availability in a forest-savannah mosaic
Serckx, Adeline ULg; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg; Bastin, Jean-François ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2014)

A topic of major interest in socio-ecology is the comparison of chimpanzees and bonobos’ grouping patterns. Numerous studies have highlighted the impact of social and environmental factors on the ... [more ▼]

A topic of major interest in socio-ecology is the comparison of chimpanzees and bonobos’ grouping patterns. Numerous studies have highlighted the impact of social and environmental factors on the different evolution in group cohesion seen in these sister species. We are still lacking, however, key information about bonobo social traits across their habitat range, in order to make accurate inter-species comparisons. In this study we investigated bonobo social cohesiveness at nesting sites depending on fruit availability in the forest-savannah mosaic of western Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a bonobo habitat which has received little attention from researchers and is characterized by high food resource variation within years. We collected data on two bonobo communities. Nest counts at nesting sites were used as a proxy for night grouping patterns and were analysed with regard to fruit availability. We also modelled bonobo population density at the site in order to investigate yearly variation. We found that one community density varied across the three years of surveys, suggesting that this bonobo community has significant variability in use of its home range. This finding highlights the importance of forest connectivity, a likely prerequisite for the ability of bonobos to adapt their ranging patterns to fruit availability changes. We found no influence of overall fruit availability on bonobo cohesiveness. Only fruit availability at the nesting sites showed a positive influence, indicating that bonobos favour food ‘hot spots’ as sleeping sites. Our findings have confirmed the results obtained from previous studies carried out in the dense tropical forests of DRC. Nevertheless, in order to clarify the impact of environmental variability on bonobo social cohesiveness, we will need to make direct observations of the apes in the forest-savannah mosaic as well as make comparisons across the entirety of the bonobos’ range using systematic methodology. [less ▲]

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See detailPatterns of tree species composition across tropical African forests
Fayolle, Adeline ULg; Swaine, Michael D.; Bastin, Jean-François ULg et al

in Journal of Biogeography (2014), online

Aim : In this study we identified large-scale variation in tree species composition across tropical African forests and determined the underlying environmental and historical factors. Location : Tropical ... [more ▼]

Aim : In this study we identified large-scale variation in tree species composition across tropical African forests and determined the underlying environmental and historical factors. Location : Tropical forests from Senegal to Mozambique. Methods : Distribution data were gathered for 1175 tree species in 455 sample sites scattered across tropical Africa, including all types of tropical forests (wet, moist, dry, and lowland to moderate elevation montane forests). The value of elevation and 19 climatic variables extracted from the BIOCLIM data set were assigned to each sample site. We determined the variation in species composition using correspondence analysis and identified the environmental correlates. We defined floristic clusters according to species composition and identified the characteristic species using indicator analysis. Results : We identified a major floristic discontinuity located at the Albertine rift that separated the dry, moist and wet forests of West and Central Africa (the entire Guineo-Congolian Region) from the upland and coastal forests of East Africa. Except for the Albertine Rift, we found no evidence to support the other proposed floristic discontinuities (Dahomey Gap etc.). We detected two main environmental gradients across tropical African forests. The rainfall gradient was strongly correlated with the variation in tree species composition in West and Central Africa. The elevation/temperature gradient highlighted the major floristic differences within East Africa and between East Africa and the Guineo-Congolian Region, the latter being most probably due to the geological disruption and associated climatic history of the East African uplift. Main conclusions : We found floristic evidence for three main biogeographical regions across the tropical African forests, and described six floristic clusters with particular environmental conditions within these regions: Coastal and Upland for East Africa, Dry and Wet-Moist for West Africa, and Moist and Wet for Central Africa. [less ▲]

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See detailAbove-ground biomass and structure of 260 african tropical forests
Lewis, Simon L.; Sonké, Bonaventure; Sunderland, Terry et al

in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (2013), 368

We report above-ground biomass (AGB), basal area, stemdensity and wood mass density estimates from 260 sample plots (mean size: 1.2 ha) in intact closed-canopy tropical forests across 12 African countries ... [more ▼]

We report above-ground biomass (AGB), basal area, stemdensity and wood mass density estimates from 260 sample plots (mean size: 1.2 ha) in intact closed-canopy tropical forests across 12 African countries. Mean AGB is 395.7 Mg dry mass ha21 (95% CI: 14.3), substantially higher than Amazonian values, with the Congo Basin and contiguous forest region attaining AGB values (429 Mg ha21) similar to those of Bornean forests, and significantly greater than East or West African forests. AGB therefore appears generally higher in palaeo- comparedwithneotropical forests.However, mean stem density is low(426+11 stems ha21 greater than or equal to 100 mm diameter) compared with both Amazonian and Bornean forests (cf. approx. 600) and is the signature structural feature of African tropical forests. While spatial autocorrelation complicates analyses, AGB shows a positive relationship with rainfall in the driest nine months of the year, and an opposite association with the wettest three months of the year; a negative relationship with temperature; positive relationship with clay-rich soils; and negative relationshipswith C :Nratio (suggesting a positive soil phosphorus–AGB relationship), and soil fertility computed as the sum of base cations. The results indicate that AGB is mediated by both climate and soils, and suggest that the AGB of African closed-canopy tropical forests may be particularly sensitive to future precipitation and temperature changes. [less ▲]

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See detailTélédétection pour la typologie forestière et l'inversion de biomasse en Afrique centrale.
Barbier, N; Bastin, Jean-François ULg; Ploton, P et al

Conference (2013, April)

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See detailEffets de lisière sur la productivité du teck (Tectona grandis L.f.): étude de cas des teckeraies privées du Sud-Bénin
Toyi, Mireille Scholastique; Bastin, Jean-François ULg; Andre, Marie ULg et al

in Tropicultura (2013), 31(1), 62-70

The present study aims to improve the production of teak wood (Tectona grandis L.f.) in private plantations in southern Benin through the application of a central concept in landscape ecology: the edge ... [more ▼]

The present study aims to improve the production of teak wood (Tectona grandis L.f.) in private plantations in southern Benin through the application of a central concept in landscape ecology: the edge effect. As teak is an heliophilous species, the hypothesis of a higher wood production in edges was tested on the basis of the basal area. Sixty-two private teak plantations were investigated and 10,667 trees were measured. The stratified sampling scheme in three distinct parts for each plantation (the centre, the edge and the summits) permitted to highlight the edge effect on wood production. For each part, a plot was installed and the diameter at breast height (dbh) was measured for all trees. The leaf area between the edge and the centre of plantations was measured. Finally, the influence of the spatial configuration of plantations and the direction of each side of these plantations on the production of wood was tested. Results show that the edge effect on the production of teak wood affects four planting lines, the first presenting a production of 150% relative to the centre. We noticed a significant influence of the edge on the leaf area of about 218% relative to the centre. No influence of the direction of the sides of the plantation was observed. The shape of the plantations presents a significant influence on the wood production. These results permitted to propose a planting model included in an agroforestry system that optimizes the production of wood per area and having a succession of two planting lines interrupted by fields. [less ▲]

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See detailTree plantation will not compensate natural woody vegetation cover loss in the Atlantic department of Southern Benin
Toyi, Mireille Scholastique; Barima, Sabas; Mama, Adi et al

in Tropicultura (2013), 31(1),

This study deals with land use and land cover changes for a 33 years period. We assessed these changes for eight land cover classes in the south of Benin by using an integrated multi-temporal analysis ... [more ▼]

This study deals with land use and land cover changes for a 33 years period. We assessed these changes for eight land cover classes in the south of Benin by using an integrated multi-temporal analysis using three Landsat images (1972 Landsat MSS, 1986 Landsat TM and 2005 Landsat ETM+). Three scenarios for the future were simulated using a first-order Markovian model based on annual probability matrices. The contribution of tree plantations to compensate forest loss was assessed. The results show a strong loss of forest and savanna, mainly due to increased agricultural land. Natural woody vegetation (“forest”, “wooded savanna” and “tree and shrub savanna”) will seriously decrease by 2025 due to the expansion of agricultural activities and the increase of settlements. Tree plantations are expected to double by 2025, but they will not compensate for the loss of natural woody vegetation cover. Consequently, we assist to a continuing woody vegetation area decrease. Policies regarding reforestation and forest conservation must be initiated to reverse the currently projected tendencies. [less ▲]

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See detailPertinence de la mise en oeuvre des initiatives de Réductions des Emissions dues à la Déforestation et à la Dégradation des forêts (REDD) pour les communautés locales. Cas des formations de tapia dans la région d'Itasy
Ratsimba, HR; Rabemananjara, ZH; Rabefarihy, AT et al

in Verheggen, François; Bogaert, Jan; Haubruge, Eric (Eds.) Les vers à soie malgaches: Enjeux écologiques et socio-économiques (2013)

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See detailDeterminism in tropical forest biomass distribution due to forest spatial structure, highlighted by the study of the edge effect.
Bastin, Jean-François ULg; Bogaert, Jan; De Cannière, Charles

in Islands in land- and seascape: the challenges of fragmentation, Erlangen February 2012 (2012, February)

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See detailIdentification and Measurement of Anthropogenic Effects in Landscapes
Bogaert, Jan ULg; Vranken, Isabelle ULg; Bastin, Jean-François ULg et al

in Jones, Bruce; Fu, Bojie (Eds.) The 8th World congress of the International Association of Landscape Ecology: Proceedings, Beijing, August 18-23, 2011 (2011, August 20)

As a consequence of anthropogenic pressure, landscapes change; deforestation is a well-known example of this type of human-driven landscape change. Landscapes change 42 from entirely natural to ... [more ▼]

As a consequence of anthropogenic pressure, landscapes change; deforestation is a well-known example of this type of human-driven landscape change. Landscapes change 42 from entirely natural to anthropogenic or cultural, in which landscape composition is marked by land covers and uses directly related to the civil society, such as degraded vegetations, agriculture, urban zones, or road networks. Landscape dynamics can be quantified by landscape pattern analysis. Many landscape metrics are available to capture the different features of pattern change. As a consequence of the pattern/process paradigm, the ecological consequences of the observed dynamics can be linked to ecosystem processes and characteristics, such as biodiversity. By means of a series of case studies linking field observations of fauna and flora with cartographic and demographic data, the importance of pattern analysis and landscape management is underlined, as well as the diversity in types of anthropogenic landscape change. Conclusions are drawn with regard to the ecological impact of landscape change. Guidelines are formulated for the characterization and analysis of anthropogenic effects in landscapes by means of pattern analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailTropical forest carbon stocks estimates. Is tree aboveground biomass variability at the landscape scale really non-significant in a REDD+ context?
Bastin, Jean-François ULg; Bogaert, Jan ULg; De Cannière, C

in Research Priorities in Tropical Silviculture: Towards New Paradigms? (2011)

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See detailMultiscalar analysis of the spatial pattern of forest ecosystems in Central Africa justified by the pattern/process paradigm: two case studies
Bastin, Jean-François ULg; Djibu, J P; Havyarimana, F et al

in Boehm, D A (Ed.) Forestry: research, ecology and policies (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (14 ULg)