References of "Barsics, Catherine"
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See detailAn ecological characterisation of face recognition using Game of Thrones.
Devue, Christel; Wride, A; Barsics, Catherine ULiege et al

Conference (2017, August 31)

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See detailTime perspective and emotional future-oriented thoughts
Barsics, Catherine ULiege

Conference (2017, May 12)

Time perspective —the tendency to focus on the past, present, and/or future— has a pervasive influence on many aspects of human cognition and behaviour, such as decision making, planning, motivation, self ... [more ▼]

Time perspective —the tendency to focus on the past, present, and/or future— has a pervasive influence on many aspects of human cognition and behaviour, such as decision making, planning, motivation, self-regulation, and sense of identity. Over the last decade, important progress has been made in understanding the representations and processes that support our ability to mentally explore possible futures. More particularly, many thoughts and mental images that people form about their personal future refer to emotionally significant events. Such emotional future-oriented thoughts (EmoFTs) were studied in natural settings and under laboratory conditions. The results showed that EmoFTs are frequent, occur in various contexts, and are perceived to fulfill important functions, mostly related to goal pursuit and emotion regulation. The phenomenological characteristics of EmoFTs (e.g., representational format) vary according to valence. When distinguishing between anticipatory and anticipated emotions (i.e., emotions experienced in the present versus emotions expected to occur in the future), a positivity bias in the frequency of EmoFTs is found to be restricted to anticipated emotions. These findings shed further light on the properties of future oriented-thoughts, and emphasize the importance of their affective components. [less ▲]

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See detailCould new information influence attitudes to foods supplemented with edible insects?
Barsics, Fanny; Caparros Megido, Rudy ULiege; Brostaux, Yves ULiege et al

in British Food Journal (2017)

Purpose: Broader acceptance of entomophagy (i.e. human consumption of insects) will depend on factors that impact consumers’ perceptions of edible insects. The purpose of this study was to examine how a ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Broader acceptance of entomophagy (i.e. human consumption of insects) will depend on factors that impact consumers’ perceptions of edible insects. The purpose of this study was to examine how a broad-based information session would affect consumers’ perceptions and attitudes about an edible insect product. Design: During a taste testing session, preceded or followed by an information session about entomophagy, participants rated the organoleptic characteristics of two bread samples on 9-point hedonic scales. The two bread samples were identical, though one was faux-labelled as containing an insect product. Findings: General Linear Model (GLM) analysis showed effects of gender, information session exposure, entomophagy familiarity, and entomophagy experience on participants’ ratings of the samples. Wilcoxon‑Mann-Whitney ranked sum tests showed that appearance, flavour, and overall liking were significantly better rated for the bread sample labelled as insect-free by participants who attended the presentation a priori. Potential ways to improve information content and delivery in favour of encouraging dietary shifts are discussed. Practical applications: This study shows that information about insect-based products could change consumers’ perceptions of such products. The results provide clues regarding how the food industry can adapt communication for target audiences. Originality: Actual edible insect products were not used in this study. Paradoxically, it is the first to show the impact of an information session on the acceptability of edible insect products, by revealing participants’ perceptual expectations. [less ▲]

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See detailReduced specificity and enhanced subjective experience of future thinking in ageing: The influence of avoidance and emotion-regulation strategies
Jumentier, Sabrina; Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Van der Linden, Martial ULiege

in Memory (2017)

Future thinking in older adults is characterised by a lack of specificity of imagined events and by an equal or even higher subjective experience, compared to younger adults. We considered whether this ... [more ▼]

Future thinking in older adults is characterised by a lack of specificity of imagined events and by an equal or even higher subjective experience, compared to younger adults. We considered whether this lack of specificity stemmed partly from the avoidance of a somewhat disturbing future and then examined the extent to which certain types of emotion-regulation strategies, namely positive reappraisal and positive refocusing, contributed to the subjective experience of future thinking. Middle-aged and older adults completed an adapted version of the AMT, in which temporal distance and cue word valence were manipulated, thus resulting in future conditions assumed to represent varying degrees of discomfort. Results indicate that distant future and negative cues restricted both the specificity and the subjective experience of future thinking. In addition, the use of avoidance strategies predicted the nature of future thoughts in the context of a supposed uncomfortable future (i.e., a distant future induced by negative cues), although it followed quite different age-related patterns. Together with the findings that positive reappraisal and positive refocusing (to a lesser extent) contributed to the subjective experience of future thinking, this study indicates that how individuals imagine their personal future also relies on affect- and emotion-regulation strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailA French version of the Balanced Time Perspective Scale: Factor structure and relation to cognitive reappraisal.
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Rebetez, Marie; Rochat, Lucien et al

in Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science = Revue Canadienne des Sciences du Comportement (2017), 49(1), 51-57

A frequent and equal tendency to think positively about one’s past and future has been conceptualised as a balanced time perspective (TP). Such a dispositional temporal orientation has been associated ... [more ▼]

A frequent and equal tendency to think positively about one’s past and future has been conceptualised as a balanced time perspective (TP). Such a dispositional temporal orientation has been associated with higher life satisfaction and happiness. The aim of the present study was to develop and to validate a French version of the Balanced Time Perspective Scale (BTPS; Webster, 2011), which has been specifically designed to assess the combined use of positive future and past mental representations as resources for the self. Data were collected from an online survey in a sample of 622 French-speaking individuals from the general population. Results indicated that the French version of the BTPS replicated the 2-factor structure of the original questionnaire, and showed excellent internal consistency. External validity was supported by specific rela- tionships with measures of TP and positive affect. In addition, a high propensity to project oneself positively both in the future and the past was associated with greater use of cognitive reappraisal. [less ▲]

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See detailLa Perspective Temporelle Equilibrée: Validation d’un questionnaire et relation avec la régulation émotionnelle.
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Rebetez, Marie My Lien; Rochat, Lucien et al

Poster (2016, November 26)

La Perspective Temporelle Equilibrée fait référence à une disposition individuelle caractérisée par le fait de se projeter mentalement dans le futur et dans le passé de manière positive et fréquente ... [more ▼]

La Perspective Temporelle Equilibrée fait référence à une disposition individuelle caractérisée par le fait de se projeter mentalement dans le futur et dans le passé de manière positive et fréquente. L’objectif de notre étude était de valider la version française d’une échelle, initialement conçue en anglais, évaluant cette orientation temporelle : la “Balanced Time Perspective Scale” (Webster, 2011). Une étude en ligne a permis de recueillir les données de 622 participants francophones issus de la population générale. Les résultats indiquent que la version française réplique la structure en deux facteurs du questionnaire original et plaident en faveur d’une bonne validité de construit. De surcroît, les résultats montrent qu’une tendance importante à se projeter mentalement dans le futur et dans le passé de manière positive et fréquente est associée à la réévaluation cognitive, une stratégie de régulation émotionnelle. En somme, ce questionnaire permet d’évaluer la perspective temporelle, qui est ici envisagée en tant qu’importante ressource pour le self, et ce, en étroite relation avec les capacités de régulation émotionnelle. [less ▲]

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See detailEmotional future-oriented thoughts: Characteristics and perceived functions
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Rebetez, Marie; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege et al

Conference (2016, July 19)

􏰥􏰁􏰋􏰰􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰚􏰛􏰞􏰉􏰈􏰃􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰁􏰈􏰆􏰔􏰊􏰚􏰔􏰖􏰊􏰆􏰜􏰚􏰂􏰕􏰆􏰁􏰘􏰚􏰛􏰈􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰄􏰂􏰆􏰜􏰛􏰈􏰛􏰂􏰊􏰆􏰂􏰊􏰜􏰊􏰂􏰆􏰈􏰚􏰆􏰊􏰕􏰚􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰁􏰖􏰖􏰰􏰆􏰃􏰄􏰞􏰋􏰄􏰜􏰄􏰅􏰁􏰋􏰈􏰆􏰊􏰙􏰊􏰋􏰈􏰃􏰵􏰆􏰭􏰛􏰅􏰉 ... [more ▼]

􏰥􏰁􏰋􏰰􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰚􏰛􏰞􏰉􏰈􏰃􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰁􏰈􏰆􏰔􏰊􏰚􏰔􏰖􏰊􏰆􏰜􏰚􏰂􏰕􏰆􏰁􏰘􏰚􏰛􏰈􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰄􏰂􏰆􏰜􏰛􏰈􏰛􏰂􏰊􏰆􏰂􏰊􏰜􏰊􏰂􏰆􏰈􏰚􏰆􏰊􏰕􏰚􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰁􏰖􏰖􏰰􏰆􏰃􏰄􏰞􏰋􏰄􏰜􏰄􏰅􏰁􏰋􏰈􏰆􏰊􏰙􏰊􏰋􏰈􏰃􏰵􏰆􏰭􏰛􏰅􏰉 􏰊􏰕􏰚􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰁􏰖􏰆􏰜􏰛􏰈􏰛􏰂􏰊􏰍􏰚􏰂􏰄􏰊􏰋􏰈􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰚􏰛􏰞􏰉􏰈􏰃􏰆􏰠􏰒􏰕􏰚􏰶􏰷􏰃􏰢􏰆􏰮􏰊􏰂􏰊􏰆􏰜􏰄􏰂􏰃􏰈􏰆􏰄􏰋􏰙􏰊􏰃􏰈􏰄􏰞􏰁􏰈􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰄􏰋􏰆􏰋􏰁􏰈􏰛􏰂􏰁􏰖􏰆􏰃􏰊􏰈􏰈􏰄􏰋􏰞􏰃􏰤􏰆􏰁􏰋􏰝􏰆􏰃􏰊􏰅􏰚􏰋􏰝 􏰄􏰋􏰆􏰁􏰆􏰖􏰁􏰘􏰆􏰃􏰈􏰛􏰝􏰰􏰤􏰆􏰝􏰄􏰃􏰈􏰄􏰋􏰞􏰛􏰄􏰃􏰉􏰄􏰋􏰞􏰆􏰘􏰊􏰈􏰮􏰊􏰊􏰋􏰆􏰁􏰋􏰈􏰄􏰅􏰄􏰔􏰁􏰈􏰚􏰂􏰰􏰆􏰁􏰋􏰝􏰆􏰁􏰋􏰈􏰄􏰅􏰄􏰔􏰁􏰈􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰊􏰕􏰚􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰃􏰆􏰠􏰄􏰵􏰊􏰵􏰤􏰆􏰊􏰕􏰚􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰃 􏰊􏰓􏰔􏰊􏰂􏰄􏰊􏰋􏰅􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰄􏰋􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰆􏰔􏰂􏰊􏰃􏰊􏰋􏰈􏰆􏰙􏰊􏰂􏰃􏰛􏰃􏰆􏰊􏰕􏰚􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰃􏰆􏰊􏰓􏰔􏰊􏰅􏰈􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰈􏰚􏰆􏰚􏰅􏰅􏰛􏰂􏰆􏰄􏰋􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰆􏰜􏰛􏰈􏰛􏰂􏰊􏰢􏰵􏰆􏰷􏰉􏰊􏰆􏰅􏰉􏰁􏰂􏰁􏰅􏰈􏰊􏰂􏰄􏰃􏰈􏰄􏰅􏰃􏰆􏰠􏰊􏰵􏰞􏰵􏰤 􏰂􏰊􏰔􏰂􏰊􏰃􏰊􏰋􏰈􏰁􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰁􏰖􏰆􏰜􏰚􏰂􏰕􏰁􏰈􏰢􏰆􏰚􏰜􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰆􏰒􏰕􏰚􏰶􏰷􏰃􏰆􏰮􏰊􏰂􏰊􏰆􏰊􏰓􏰁􏰕􏰄􏰋􏰊􏰝􏰤􏰆􏰁􏰃􏰆􏰮􏰊􏰖􏰖􏰆􏰁􏰃􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰄􏰂􏰆􏰔􏰊􏰂􏰅􏰊􏰄􏰙􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰜􏰛􏰋􏰅􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰃􏰵 􏰒􏰕􏰚􏰶􏰷􏰃􏰆􏰁􏰂􏰊􏰆􏰜􏰂􏰊􏰸􏰛􏰊􏰋􏰈􏰤􏰆􏰁􏰂􏰊􏰆􏰔􏰊􏰂􏰅􏰊􏰄􏰙􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰈􏰚􏰆􏰜􏰛􏰖􏰜􏰄􏰖􏰖􏰆􏰄􏰕􏰔􏰚􏰂􏰈􏰁􏰋􏰈􏰆􏰜􏰛􏰋􏰅􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰃􏰆􏰃􏰛􏰅􏰉􏰆􏰁􏰃􏰆􏰞􏰚􏰁􏰖􏰆􏰔􏰛􏰂􏰃􏰛􏰄􏰈􏰆􏰁􏰋􏰝􏰆􏰊􏰕􏰚􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋 􏰂􏰊􏰞􏰛􏰖􏰁􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰤􏰆􏰁􏰋􏰝􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰄􏰂􏰆􏰅􏰉􏰁􏰂􏰁􏰅􏰈􏰊􏰂􏰄􏰃􏰈􏰄􏰅􏰃􏰆􏰙􏰁􏰂􏰰􏰆􏰁􏰅􏰅􏰚􏰂􏰝􏰄􏰋􏰞􏰆􏰈􏰚􏰆􏰙􏰁􏰖􏰊􏰋􏰅􏰊􏰵􏰆􏰹􏰉􏰊􏰋􏰆􏰊􏰓􏰁􏰕􏰄􏰋􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰄􏰋􏰆􏰝􏰁􏰄􏰖􏰰􏰆􏰖􏰄􏰜􏰊􏰤􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊 􏰔􏰚􏰃􏰄􏰈􏰄􏰙􏰄􏰈􏰰􏰆􏰘􏰄􏰁􏰃􏰆􏰄􏰋􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰆􏰜􏰂􏰊􏰸􏰛􏰊􏰋􏰅􏰰􏰆􏰚􏰜􏰆􏰒􏰕􏰚􏰶􏰷􏰃􏰆􏰄􏰃􏰆􏰂􏰊􏰃􏰈􏰂􏰄􏰅􏰈􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰈􏰚􏰆􏰁􏰋􏰈􏰄􏰅􏰄􏰔􏰁􏰈􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰊􏰕􏰚􏰈􏰄􏰚􏰋􏰃􏰵􏰆􏰺􏰙􏰊􏰂􏰁􏰖􏰖􏰤􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰃􏰊 􏰜􏰄􏰋􏰝􏰄􏰋􏰞􏰃􏰆􏰃􏰉􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰜􏰛􏰂􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰂􏰆􏰖􏰄􏰞􏰉􏰈􏰆􏰚􏰋􏰆􏰈􏰉􏰊􏰆􏰔􏰂􏰚􏰔􏰊􏰂􏰈􏰄􏰊􏰃􏰆􏰚􏰜􏰆􏰜􏰛􏰈􏰛􏰂􏰊􏰍􏰚􏰂􏰄􏰊􏰋􏰈􏰊􏰝􏰆􏰈􏰉 [less ▲]

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See detailVers une approche multidimensionnelle de la procrastination.
Rebetez, Marie; Rochat, Lucien; Barsics, Catherine ULiege et al

Poster (2016, June 10)

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See detailLa version française de l’Echelle de Perspective Temporelle Equilibrée: Validation et relation avec la réévaluation cognitive.
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Rebetez, Marie; Rochat, Lucien et al

Poster (2016, June 10)

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See detailOutlining face processing skills of portrait artists: Performance reflects perceptual experience with faces.
Devue, Christel ULiege; Barsics, Catherine ULiege

in Vision Research (2016), 127

Most humans seem to demonstrate astonishingly high levels of skill in face processing if one considers the sophisticated level of fine-tuned discrimination that face recognition requires. However ... [more ▼]

Most humans seem to demonstrate astonishingly high levels of skill in face processing if one considers the sophisticated level of fine-tuned discrimination that face recognition requires. However, numerous studies now indicate that the ability to process faces is not as fundamental as once thought and that performance can range from despairingly poor to extraordinarily high across people. Here we studied people who are super-specialists of faces, namely portrait artists, to examine how their specific visual experience with faces relates to a range of face processing skills (perceptual discrimination, short- and longer term recognition). Artists show better perceptual discrimination and, to some extent, recognition of newly learned faces than controls. They are also more accurate on other perceptual tasks (i.e., involving non-face stimuli or mental rotation). By contrast, artists do not display an advantage compared to controls on longer term face recognition (i.e., famous faces) nor on person recognition from other sensorial modalities (i.e., voices). Finally, the face inversion effect exists in artists and controls and is not modulated by artistic practice. Advantages in face processing for artists thus seem to closely mirror perceptual and visual short term memory skills involved in portraiture. [less ▲]

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See detailProcrastination as a self-regulation failure: The role of inhibition, negative affect, and gender.
Rebetez, Marie; Rochat, Lucien; Barsics, Catherine ULiege et al

in Personality and Individual Differences (2016), 101

Procrastination is a widespread phenomenon described as the quintessence of self-regulatory failure. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of inhibition capacities (prepotent response ... [more ▼]

Procrastination is a widespread phenomenon described as the quintessence of self-regulatory failure. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of inhibition capacities (prepotent response inhibition and resistance to proactive interference), negative affect, and gender in this self-regulatory failure. One hundred thirteen partici- pants completed two tasks assessing prepotent response inhibition and resistance to proactive interference, as well as questionnaires measuring procrastination and trait negative affect. Three profiles of inhibitors were iden- tified through cluster analysis: the first had good capacities in both prepotent response inhibition and resistance to proactive interference, the second had good capacities in resisting proactive interference but lower capacities in inhibiting prepotent response, and the third had good capacities in inhibiting prepotent response but lower capacities in resisting proactive interference. Procrastination was higher in this last cluster, but only under par- ticular conditions (relatively higher level of negative affect) and in some participants (women). These results shed new light on the role of inhibition-related functions, negative affect, and gender in procrastination. [less ▲]

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See detailProcrastination, consideration of future consequences, and episodic future thinking
Rebetez, Marie My Lien; Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Rochat, Lucien et al

in Consciousness & Cognition (2016), 42

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See detailFrequency, characteristics, and perceived functions of emotional future thinking in daily life
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Van der Linden, Martial ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

in Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2016), 69

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See detailCharacteristics and functions of emotional future thinking in everyday life
Barsics, Catherine ULiege

Conference (2015, September 08)

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See detailEmotional future-oriented thoughts in daily life
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Van der Linden, Martial ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

Conference (2015, July 10)

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See detailEmotional future thinking in daily life
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Van der Linden, Martial ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailEfficacy and cost-effectiveness: A study of different treatment approaches in a tertiary pain centre
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; Gillet, Aline ULiege; MALAISE, Nicole ULiege et al

in European Journal of Pain (London, England) (2015)

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See detailPerson recognition is easier from faces than from voices
Barsics, Catherine ULiege

in Psychologica Belgica (2014), 54(3), 244254

This article reviews a number of recent studies that systematically compared the access to semantic and episodic information from faces and voices. Results have showed that semantic and episodic ... [more ▼]

This article reviews a number of recent studies that systematically compared the access to semantic and episodic information from faces and voices. Results have showed that semantic and episodic information is easier to retrieve from faces than from voices. This advantage of faces over voices is a robust phenomenon, which emerges whatever the kind of target persons, might they be famous, personally familiar to the participants, or newly learned. Theoretical accounts of this face advantage over voice are finally discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailPerson recognition is easier from faces than from voices
Barsics, Catherine ULiege

Conference (2013, November 22)

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