References of "Aubinet, Marc"
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See detailCarbon balance of an intensively grazed grassland in southern Belgium
Gourlez de la Motte, Louis ULg; Jérôme, Elisabeth; Mamadou, Ossénatou et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2016), 228-229

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See detailDisentangling soil from plant methanol exchanges in a maize field: a first step
Bachy, Aurélie ULg; Mozaffar, Ahsan ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2016, June)

This poster presents the current research done in order to disentangle soil from plant methanol exchanges in a maize field. Methanol exchanges were calculated at ecosystem-scale (therefore including both ... [more ▼]

This poster presents the current research done in order to disentangle soil from plant methanol exchanges in a maize field. Methanol exchanges were calculated at ecosystem-scale (therefore including both components). It bases on the following observation: methanol exchanges on bare soil (measured when maize was at germination stage) were as important as when plants were fast growing (and thereby, when the highest methanol plant methanol emissions were expected), and this under similar weather conditions. The goal of this poster is thus to understand why emissions were similar at these two periods. First, it addresses the question of the actual contribution of maize plants in methanol exchanges, by comparing up-scaled methanol exchanges measured on maize at leaf-scale (Mozaffar A.) to those measured at ecosystem-scale. Then, it investigates methanol exchanges mechanisms in order to evaluate how did soil methanol emissions evolve along the maize growing season. At the end of this poster, the hypothesis of decreasing soil methanol emissions along the maize growing season is proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailVingt ans de mesures des échanges de CO2 et de vapeur d'eau à l'Observatoire Terrestre de Vielsalm
Aubinet, Marc ULg; Vincke, Caroline; Heinesch, Bernard ULg et al

Article for general public (2016)

La séquestration du carbone via l'assimilation nette de CO2 par les écosystèmes terrestres varie fortement d'une année à l'autre. La compréhension plus fine de ce phénomène est nécessaire pour pouvoir ... [more ▼]

La séquestration du carbone via l'assimilation nette de CO2 par les écosystèmes terrestres varie fortement d'une année à l'autre. La compréhension plus fine de ce phénomène est nécessaire pour pouvoir prédire si les écosystèmes continueront à se comporter comme des puits de carbone ou si la séquestration va diminuer voire s'inverser complètement, transformant les écosystèmes en source de carbone. Pour mesurer les échanges nets de CO2, des chercheurs ont installé un "Observatoire Terrestre" dans une forêt à Vielsalm qui a permis de mettre en évidence les dynamiques journalière, saisonnière et interannuelle de la séquestration en carbone. La mesure simultanée de l'évapotranspiration réelle permet de plus d'évaluer la consommation en eau des espèces présentes. Les mesures effectuées durant 20 ans montrent que la forêt se comporte comme un puits de carbone. [less ▲]

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See detailOzone concentration and CO2 flux monitoring in a belgian forest
Hurdebise, Quentin ULg; Bergmans, Benjamin; Aubinet, Marc ULg

Poster (2016, May 11)

Temperate forests, as other ecosystems and oceans, mitigate the accumulation in the atmosphere of CO2, the main responsible for the current climate change. It is, therefore, a necessity to understand how ... [more ▼]

Temperate forests, as other ecosystems and oceans, mitigate the accumulation in the atmosphere of CO2, the main responsible for the current climate change. It is, therefore, a necessity to understand how these forests react and will react in a changing environment. That requires long-term monitoring of the environment. Tropospheric ozone is one parameter to monitor as it affects the forest by inducing oxidative stress once inside the leaves. Using 16 years of continuous data from an air quality monitoring station managed by the ISSeP (Institut Scientifique de Service Public) located in a mixed forest in east Belgium, we identified ozone concentration extreme events and we investigated their occurrence frequency as well as their relation with climatic variables and air components. As variables are subjected to daily, yearly and inter-annual dynamics, anomalies were used to detect extreme events. To obtain anomalies, we removed the previously mentioned dynamics from half-hourly raw data. Daily and yearly dynamics were removed first and explained 40% of the variability observed in half-hourly ozone concentrations. Then, the inter-annual dynamic was obtained by computing the yearly mean of the residuals, it accounted for 2% of the variability observed. A significant (p<0.01) decreasing trend was observed for these residuals. Determining if that trend is site specific or regionally observed can be done by applying the same analysis to the other sites from the network managed by the ISSeP. No significant trend in the yearly frequency and intensity of extreme events was observed. We used a stepwise regression to identify the variables that explain these extreme events. Significant relations were found between ozone concentration and climatic variables (vapor pressure deficit, temperature, radiation and wind direction) as well as other air components concentration (NO2, NO, NOX, CO). The next step will be to estimate the forest capacity to uptake ozone in order to predict ozone-induced damage and compared it to the CO2 uptake and H2O emissions measured in an ICOS site, the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory, located in the same forest at less than 300 meters from the air quality monitoring station. [less ▲]

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See detailAre BVOC exchanges in agricultural ecosystems overestimated? Insights from fluxes measured in a maize field over a whole growing season
Bachy, Aurélie ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, Niels et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2016), 16(8),

Although maize is the second most important crop worldwide, and the most important C4 crop, no study on biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) has yet been conducted on this crop at ecosystem scale ... [more ▼]

Although maize is the second most important crop worldwide, and the most important C4 crop, no study on biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) has yet been conducted on this crop at ecosystem scale and over a whole growing season. This has led to large uncertainties in cropland BVOC emission estimations. This paper seeks to fill this gap by presenting, for the first time, BVOC fluxes measured in a maize field at ecosystem scale (using the disjunct eddy covariance by mass scanning technique) over a whole growing season in Belgium. The maize field emitted mainly methanol, although exchanges were bi-directional. The second most exchanged compound was acetic acid, which was taken up mainly in the growing season. Bi-directional exchanges of acetaldehyde, acetone and other oxygenated VOCs also occurred, whereas the terpenes, benzene and toluene exchanges were small, albeit significant. Surprisingly, BVOC exchanges were of the same order of magnitude on bare soil and on well developed vegetation, suggesting that soil is a major BVOC reservoir in agricultural ecosystems. Quantitatively, the maize BVOC emissions observed were lower than those reported in other maize, crops and grasses studies. The standard emission factors (SEFs) estimated in this study (231 ± 19 µg m−2 h−1 for methanol, 8 ± 5 µg m−2 h−1 for isoprene and 4 ± 6 µg m−2 h−1 for monoterpenes) were also much lower than those currently used by models for C4 crops, particularly for terpenes. These results suggest that maize fields are small BVOC exchangers in north-western Europe, with a lower BVOC emission impact than that modelled for growing C4 crops in this part of the world. They also reveal the high variability in BVOC exchanges across world regions for maize and suggest that SEFs should be estimated for each region separately. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of tillage on CO2 and N2O efflux in an agricultural crop
Lognoul, Margaux ULg; Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas ULg; Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2016, April 20)

CO2 and N2O fluxes exchanged by a maize crop were measured from June to Octboer 2015 using a homemade automated system of dynamic closed chambers. We studied the impact of tillage (reduced and ... [more ▼]

CO2 and N2O fluxes exchanged by a maize crop were measured from June to Octboer 2015 using a homemade automated system of dynamic closed chambers. We studied the impact of tillage (reduced and conventional) on greenhouse gas emissions and nitrous oxide flux dynamics. [less ▲]

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See detailAre BVOC exchanges in agricultural ecosystems overestimated? Insights from fluxes measured in a maize field over a whole growing season
Bachy, Aurélie ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, Niels et al

Conference (2016, April 18)

This oral communication aims to present the main outputs of the BVOC (Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds) flux measurement campaign performed on a maize field in Belgium. It begins by highligthing the ... [more ▼]

This oral communication aims to present the main outputs of the BVOC (Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds) flux measurement campaign performed on a maize field in Belgium. It begins by highligthing the interest of investigating BVOC exchanges on maize; then measurement techniques are briefly presented. The second half of the communication aims to present and discuss the main outputs of this measurement campaign (similar BVOC composition, lower exchange rate than other maize and cropland/grassland studies, significant importance of soil in ecosystem exchanges, strong differences between exchanges rates observed in this study and those used by up-scaling models). [less ▲]

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See detailCanopy proximity estimation and impact on long term turbulent fluxes above a heterogeneous forest
Hurdebise, Quentin ULg; Vincke, Caroline; De Ligne, Anne ULg et al

Poster (2016, April 18)

With the development of eddy covariance networks like Fluxnet, ICOS or NEON, long-term data series of carbon dioxide, water vapor and other gas exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere will ... [more ▼]

With the development of eddy covariance networks like Fluxnet, ICOS or NEON, long-term data series of carbon dioxide, water vapor and other gas exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere will become more and more numerous. However, long-term analyses of such exchanges require a good understanding of measurement conditions during the investigated period. Independently of climate drivers, measurements may indeed be influenced by measurement conditions themselves subjected to long-term variability due to vegetation growth or set-up changes. The present research refers to the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory (VTO) where fluxes of momentum, carbon dioxide, latent and sensible heat have been continuously measured by eddy covariance during twenty years. VTO is an ICOS site installed in a mixed forest (beech, silver fir, Douglas fir, Norway spruce) in the Belgian Ardennes. A multidisciplinary approach was developed in order to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of several site characteristics: - displacement height (d) and relative measurement height (z-d) were determined using a spectral approach that compared observed and theoretical cospectra; - turbulence statistics were analyzed in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory; - tree height during the measurement period was obtained by combining tree height inventories, a LIDAR survey and tree growth models; - measurement footprint was determined by using a footprint model. A good agreement was found between the three first approaches. Results show notably that z-d was subjected to both temporal and spatial evolution. Temporal evolution resulted from continuous tree growth as well as from a tower raise, achieved in 2009. Spatial evolution, due to canopy heterogeneity, was also observed. The impacts of these changes on measurements are investigated. In particular, it was shown that they affect measurement footprint, flux spectral corrections and flux quality. All these effects must be taken into consideration in order to disentangle long-term flux evolutions due to climate or phenology from changes resulting from measurement set-up changes. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of tillage on N2O and CO2 efflux in an agricultural crop
Lognoul, Margaux ULg; Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas ULg; Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2016, April)

In an experiment conducted in the Belgian loess belt between June and October 2015, the effect of two tillage treatments (CT - conventional tillage and RT - reduced tillage) on CO2 and N2O fluxes ... [more ▼]

In an experiment conducted in the Belgian loess belt between June and October 2015, the effect of two tillage treatments (CT - conventional tillage and RT - reduced tillage) on CO2 and N2O fluxes exchanged by a maize crop were compared. Fluxes were measured using two fully automated sets of dynamic closed chambers, allowing a 4.5h temporal resolution. Soil water content and temperature were also monitored as well as pH, total N (TN) and total organic C (TOC) content. [less ▲]

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See detailDimensioning IRGA gas sampling systems: laboratory and field experiments
Aubinet, Marc ULg; Joly, Lilian; Loustau, Denis et al

in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (2016), 9

Both laboratory and field experiments were carried out in order to define suitable configuration ranges for the gas sampling systems (GSSs) of infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) used in eddy covariance ... [more ▼]

Both laboratory and field experiments were carried out in order to define suitable configuration ranges for the gas sampling systems (GSSs) of infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) used in eddy covariance measurements. In the laboratory, an original dynamic calibration bench was developed in order to test the frequency attenuation and pressure drop generated by filters. In the field, three IRGAs of the same type equipped with different filters or different rain caps were installed and run and the real frequency response of the complete setup was tested. The main results are as follows. – Filters may have a strong impact on the pressure drop in the GSS and this impact increases with flow rate. – Conversely, no impact of the tested filters on cut-off frequency was found, GSSs with and without filters presenting similar cut-off frequencies. – The main limiting factor of cut-off frequency in the field was found to be the rain cap design. In addition, the impact of this design on pressure drop was also found to be noteworthy. [less ▲]

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See detailResponse of CO2 fluxes and productivity to water availability in two contrasting ecosystems in northern Benin (West Africa)
Ago, Expédit Evariste ULg; Agbossou, Euloge Kossi; Cohard, Jean-Martial et al

in Annals of Forest Science (2016)

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See detailOUTDOOR MEASUREMENT OF CATTLE METHANE EMISSIONS USING THE EDDY-COVARIANCE TECHNIQUE IN COMBINATION WITH GEOLOCALIZATION DEVICES
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2016, February)

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions [1]. In order to improve emissions reporting and properly test mitigation options ... [more ▼]

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions [1]. In order to improve emissions reporting and properly test mitigation options, techniques for measuring methane emissions from cattle must be developed and adapted to each management system. Among available micrometeorological methods, the use of eddy-covariance is still in its infancy [2] and its relevance and robustness for cattle flux estimation has still to be proved. On one hand, it is well adapted to seasonal grazing systems, is non-invasive, needs little animal handling and allows detection of daily emission patterns. On the other hand, it has the drawback of requiring cattle geo-localization and long periods of measurements (typically one month). In this study, we combined measured CH4 fluxes with a footprint model [3] and cattle positions (GPS devices) over several one-month campaigns at key periods in the grazing season in order to obtain CH4 emissions per cow at herd scale. Accelerometers were also added to the system for behaviour detection, opening the possibility of linking emissions to feeding behaviour. Measurements were performed and are still ongoing at the Dorinne Terrestrial Observatory in 2014/2015. The first campaign provided a mean emission per cow of 65±6 kg CH4.LSU-1.year-1. Cattle emission pattern was tightly linked with behaviour pattern, emissions being higher during and shortly after grazing (i.e. at dawn and dusk). Uncertainties linked to the method will be discussed and quantified (footprint model validity, geo-localization precision, eddy covariance corrections and filtering specificities linked to CH4 measurements). Compilation of data from multiple campaigns will allow quantification of the effects of forage quality, animal weight and lactating state on emissions per cow. [less ▲]

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See detailUnexpected sensitivity of the annual net ecosystem exchange to the high frequency loss corrections in a grazed grassland site in Belgium
Mamadou, Ossénatou ULg; Gourlez de la Motte, Louis ULg; De Ligne, Anne ULg et al

Poster (2016)

The eddy covariance technique is widely used to measure CO2 and other gas fluxes. However, eddy covariance fluxes are affected by systematic errors that must be corrected. Among them, high frequency loss ... [more ▼]

The eddy covariance technique is widely used to measure CO2 and other gas fluxes. However, eddy covariance fluxes are affected by systematic errors that must be corrected. Among them, high frequency loss corrections are particularly important in this regard, especially when using a closed-path infrared gas analyzer. In this study, we compared three approaches to do these corrections for CO2 fluxes and evaluated their impact on the carbon balance an intensively grazed grassland site in Belgium . In the first approach, the computation of correction factors was based on the measured sensible heat cospectra (‘local’ cospectra), whereas the other two were based on theoretical models (Kaimal et al., 1972). The correction approaches were validated by comparing the nighttime eddy covariance CO2 fluxes corrected with each approach and in situ soil respiration measurements. We found that the local cospectra differed from the Kaimal theoretical shape, although the site could not be considered ‘difficult’ (i.e., fairly flat, homogeneous, low vegetation, sufficient measurement height), appearing less peaked in the inertial subrange. This difference greatly affected the correction factor, especially for night fluxes. Night fluxes measured by eddy covariance were found to be in good accord with in situ soil respiration measurements when corrected with local cospectra and to be overestimated when corrected with Kaimal cospectra. As the difference between correction factors was larger in stable than unstable conditions, this acts as a selective systematic error and has an important impact on annual fluxes. On the basis of a 4-year average, at DTO the errors reach 71-150 g C m-2 y-1 for net ecosystem exchange (NEE), 280-562 g C m-2 y-1 for total ecosystem respiration (TER) and 209-412 g C m-2 y-1 for gross primary productivity (GPP), depending on the approach used. We finally encourage site PIs to check the cospectrum shape at their sites and, if necessary, compute frequency correction factors on the basis of local cospectra rather than on Kaimal cospectra. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon balance of an intensively grazed grassland in southern Belgium
Gourlez de la Motte, Louis ULg; Jérôme, Elisabeth; Mamadou, Ossénatou ULg et al

Poster (2016)

Grasslands are an important component of the global carbon balance but their carbon storage potential is still highly uncertain. Especially, the impact of weather variability and management practices on ... [more ▼]

Grasslands are an important component of the global carbon balance but their carbon storage potential is still highly uncertain. Especially, the impact of weather variability and management practices on grassland carbon budgets need to be assessed. This study investigates the carbon balance of an intensively managed permanent grassland in southern Belgium and its uncertainties by combining 5-years of eddy covariance measurements and other organic carbon exchanges estimates. The specificities of this study lie in: (i) the age of the pasture, which has probably been established since more than one century; (ii) the intensive character of the management with a mean grazing pressure larger than 2 livestock unit ha-1 and stocking cycle including stocking and rest periods, (iii) the livestock production system, typical of Wallonia, farming intensively Belgian Blue breed of cattle in order to produce meat. The results showed that, despite the high stocking rate and the old age of the pasture and the high stocking rate, the site acted as a relatively stable carbon sink from year to year with a 5-year average Net Biome Productivity of ‒173 [‒128 ‒203] g C m-2 yr-1. The carbon sink behavior of the pasture was directly increased by management practices through food complementation and organic fertilization and indirectly by mineral fertilization. The relatively low carbon budget inter-annual variability could be explained both by: (i) grazing management of the farmer that regulated Growth Primary Productivity by adapting the stocking rate to the Leaf Area Index which itself depends on weather conditions, (ii) carbon imports through food complements only when grass regrowth was not sufficient to feed the cattle. An exception occurred when low temperatures at the beginning of the year and a prolonged snow period provoked a delay in grass growth and therefore Growth Primary Productivity that could not be completely offset during the rest of the year. The results suggest that management practices that tend to optimize forage availability for meat production could contribute to maintaining a carbon sink. [less ▲]

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See detailMesure des flux de CO2 et séquestration de carbone dans les écosystèmes terrestres ouest-africains (Synthèse Bibliographique)
Ago, Expédit Evariste ULg; Agbossou, Euloge Kossi; Ozer, Pierre ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2016), 20(1), 1-15

In West Africa, as elsewhere in other parts of the world, preserving terrestrial ecosystems has proven essential to any emissions mitigation policy for greenhouse gases, notably carbon dioxide. A ... [more ▼]

In West Africa, as elsewhere in other parts of the world, preserving terrestrial ecosystems has proven essential to any emissions mitigation policy for greenhouse gases, notably carbon dioxide. A meaningful assessment of the contribution of a given region to the global carbon cycle implies the need to think in terms of balance, taking into account the totality of the carbon export and import within the ecosystems [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (13 ULg)