References of "van Wesemael, Bas"
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See detailMapping Soil Organic Carbon stocks and estimating uncertainties at the regional scale following a legacy sampling strategy (Southern Belgium, Wallonia)
Chartin, Caroline; Stevens, Antoine; Goidts, Esther et al

in Geoderma Regional (2017), 9

The quantification and the spatialisation of reliable SOC stocks (Mg C ha− 1) and total stock (Tg C) baselines and associated uncertainties are fundamental to detect the gains or losses in SOC, and to ... [more ▼]

The quantification and the spatialisation of reliable SOC stocks (Mg C ha− 1) and total stock (Tg C) baselines and associated uncertainties are fundamental to detect the gains or losses in SOC, and to locate sensitive areas with low SOC levels. Here, we aim to both quantify and spatialize SOC stocks at regional scale (southern Belgium) based on data from one non-design-based or model-based sampling scheme. To this end, we developed a computation procedure based on Digital Soil Mapping techniques and stochastic simulations (Monte-Carlo) allowing the estimation of multiple (here, 10,000) independent spatialized datasets. The computation of the prediction uncertainty accounts for the errors associated to both the estimations of i) SOC stocks and ii) parameters of the spatial model. Based on these 10,000 individuals, median SOC stocks and 90% prediction intervals were computed for each pixel, as well as total SOC stocks and their 90% prediction intervals for selected sub-areas and for the entire study area. Hence, a Generalised Additive Model (GAM) explaining 69.3% of the SOC stock variance was calibrated and then validated (R2 = 0.64). The model overestimated low SOC stock (below 50 Mg C ha− 1) and underestimated high SOC stock (especially those above 100 Mg C kg− 1). A positive gradient of SOC stock occurred from the northwest to the center of Wallonia with a slight decrease on the southernmost part, correlating to the evolution of precipitation and temperature (along with elevation) and dominant land use. At the catchment scale higher SOC stocks were predicted on valley bottoms, especially for poorly drained soils under grassland. Mean predicted SOC stocks for cropland and grassland in Wallonia were of 26.58 Tg C (SD 1.52) and 43.30 Tg C (2.93), respectively. The procedure developed here allowed to predict realistic spatial patterns of SOC stocks all over agricultural lands of southern Belgium and to produce reliable statistics of total SOC stocks for each of the 20 combinations of land use/agricultural regions of Wallonia. This procedure appears useful to produce soil maps as policy tools in conducting sustainable management at regional and national scales, and to compute statistics which comply with specific requirements of reporting activities. [less ▲]

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See detailDetermining RUSLE P-factors for stonebunds and trenches in rangeland and cropland, Northern Ethiopia
Taye, Gebeyehu; Poesen, Jean; Vanmaercke, Matthias ULiege et al

Conference (2017, April 24)

The implementation of soil and water conservation (SWC) measures in the Ethiopian highlands is a top priority to reduce soil erosion rates and to enhance the sustainability of agroecosystem. Nonetheless ... [more ▼]

The implementation of soil and water conservation (SWC) measures in the Ethiopian highlands is a top priority to reduce soil erosion rates and to enhance the sustainability of agroecosystem. Nonetheless, the effectiveness of many of these measures for different hillslope and land use conditions remains currently poorly understood. As a result, the overall effects of these measures at regional or catchment scale remain hard to quantify. This study addresses this knowledge gap by determining the cover-management (C) and support practice (P) factors of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), for commonly used SWC measures in semi-arid environments (i.e. stone bunds, trenches and a combination of both). Calculations were based on soil loss data collected with runoff plots in Tigray, northern Ethiopia (i.e. 21 runoff plots of 600 to 1000 m2 , monitored during 2010, 2011 and 2012). The runoff plots were installed in rangeland and cropland sites corresponding to a gentle (5%), medium (12%) and steep (16%) slope gradients. The C and P factors of the RUSLE were calculated following the recommended standard procedures. Results show that the C-factor for rangeland ranges from 0.31 to 0.98 and from 0.06 to 0.39 for cropland. For rangeland, this large variability is due to variations in vegetation cover caused by grazing. In cropland, C-factors vary with tillage practices and crop types. The calculated P-factors ranged from 0.32 to 0.74 for stone bunds, from 0.07 to 0.65 for trenches and from 0.03 to 0.22 for a combination of both stone bunds and trenches. This variability is partly due to variations in the density of the implemented measures in relation to land use (cropland vs rangeland) and slope angles. However, also annual variations in P factor values are highly significant. Especially trenches showed a very significant decline of effectiveness over time, which is attributable to their reduced static storage capacity as a result of sediment deposition (e.g. for trenches in rangeland: 0.07-0.13 in 2010 to 0.37-0.65 in 2012). Hence, the results of this work may not only help in better modelling and quantifying the average long-term impacts of SWC measures over larger areas, but also show the importance of considering temporal variations of the effectiveness of SWC measures. [less ▲]

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See detailL’intégration d’indicateurs biologiques dans un réseau de surveillance des sols afin d’améliorer le diagnostic de la qualité du sol – une étude de cas dans le sud de la Belgique (Wallonie)
Krüger, Inken ULiege; Chartin, Caroline; van Wesemael, Bas et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2017), 21(S1),

Soil organisms and their activities are essential for soil ecosystem functioning and they can thus be used as pertinent indicators of soil quality. Recent efforts have been undertaken to include ... [more ▼]

Soil organisms and their activities are essential for soil ecosystem functioning and they can thus be used as pertinent indicators of soil quality. Recent efforts have been undertaken to include biological indicators of soil quality into regional/national monitoring networks. Objectives. The aim of this study was to provide a first dataset of six biological indicators and two eco-physiological quotients for two landscape units in Wallonia. These spatial units are characterized by homogeneous climate conditions, soil type, land-use and management (here, grasslands in the Ardennes, and croplands in the Loam Region). Method. Respiration potential, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, net nitrogen mineralization, metabolic potential of soil bacteria and earthworm abundance were measured at a total of 60 sites in two different landscape units (LSU). Variability within each LSU was studied. Data was synthesized through calculation of a comprehensive score and presentation as radar plots. Results. All selected biological indicators were significantly higher under grassland than under cropland soils, highlighting the biological indicators’ power of discrimination between main land use types. Variability within LSU depended on the biological indicator and was generally higher in grassland than in cropland soils. Each site could unambiguously be assigned to its landscape unit based on its calculated comprehensive score. Radar plots allowed an assessment of the distribution of values within a landscape unit at a glance. Conclusions. The pilot-study defined the first baseline values for agricultural soils in Wallonia and laid the foundation for a monitoring network of biological soil quality. [less ▲]

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See detailSoil organic carbon fractionation for improving agricultural soil quality assessment – a case study in Southern Belgium (Wallonia)
Trigalet, Sylvain; Chartin, Caroline; Krüger, Inken ULiege et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2017), 21(S1),

Description of the subject. The paper presents and discusses a method for fractionating bulk soil organic carbon (SOC) in meaningful SOC fractions to better assess SOC status and its related soil ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. The paper presents and discusses a method for fractionating bulk soil organic carbon (SOC) in meaningful SOC fractions to better assess SOC status and its related soil ecosystem functions. Objectives. The objective is to perform an evaluation of ecosystem functions of soil organic matter at plot scale and compare it to the normal operative range of the local agro-ecological region. Method. By separating carbon associated with clay and fine silt particles (stable carbon with slow turnover rate, < 20 μm) and carbon non-associated with this fraction (labile and intermediate carbon with higher turnover rates, ≥ 20 μm), effects of management can be detected more efficiently at different scales. Conclusions. Soil organic carbon fractions, used as proxies for soil ecosystem functions, can be helpful because they represent SOC functional pools. This paper proposes to apply fractionation on samples taken at plot and regional scale. It is therefore possible to establish a normal operative range for a specific agro-region for comparison with the values in individual plots. This allows drawing a baseline for SOC fractions status in a specific agricultural unit. This approach provides valuable information to study and evaluate the impact of agricultural management in the context of enhancing soil quality and functions. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrating biological indicators in a monitoring network to improve soil quality diagnosis – a case study in Southern Belgium
Krüger, Inken ULiege; Chartin, Caroline; van Wesemael, Bas et al

Conference (2016, July 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (5 ULiège)
See detailStocks de Carbone Organique et des incertitudes
Chartin, Caroline; Krüger, Inken ULiege; Carnol, Monique ULiege et al

Conference (2016, July 05)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULiège)
See detailL’intégration d’indicateurs biologiques dans un réseau de surveillance des sols afin d’améliorer le diagnostic de la qualité du sol – une étude de cas dans le sud de la Belgique (Wallonie)
Krüger, Inken ULiege; Chartin, Caroline; van Wesemael, Bas et al

Poster (2016, July 05)

Les organismes du sol et leurs activités sont essentiels pour le fonctionnement de l’écosystème du sol et ils peuvent donc servir comme indicateurs de la qualité du sol. Des efforts ont récemment été ... [more ▼]

Les organismes du sol et leurs activités sont essentiels pour le fonctionnement de l’écosystème du sol et ils peuvent donc servir comme indicateurs de la qualité du sol. Des efforts ont récemment été menés pour intégrer les indicateurs biologiques de la qualité du sol dans les réseaux de surveillance régionaux/nationaux. Le but de cette étude était de déterminer des gammes de valeurs pour six indicateurs biologiques et deux quotients éco-physiologiques pour les sols agricoles. La respiration potentielle, la biomasse microbienne (carbone et azote), la minéralisation nette de l’azote, la diversité métabolique des bactéries du sol, l’abondance des vers de terre, le quotient microbien et le quotient métabolique ont été mesurés dans 60 sites dans des régions agricoles contrastées (différents types de sol et climat) et différentes utilisations de sol (prairies et cultures) sélectionnés d’un réseau de surveillance du carbone organique du sol (CARBOSOL). Les liens entre indicateurs biologiques et paramètres chimiques (le pH du sol, carbone organique total, soluble, labile et stable) sont analysés. Quatre des six indicateurs biologiques sélectionnés (respiration potentielle, biomasse microbienne (carbone et azote) et diversité métabolique des bactéries du sol) sont significativement plus élevés sous prairies que sous cultures. Les gammes de valeurs sont plus larges sous prairies que sous cultures. Les indicateurs biologiques sélectionnés ne sont pas significativement influencés par la région agricole. Les meilleures corrélations avec les paramètres chimiques ont été trouvées pour la respiration potentielle et la biomasse microbienne (carbone et azote). L’étude définit des gammes de valeurs pour les sols agricoles à l’échelle régionale (Wallonie) séparées par utilisation de sol (prairies et cultures) et présente une base solide pour l’établissement d’un réseau de surveillance de la qualité biologique du sol. [less ▲]

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See detailPrésentation du projet CARBIOSOL: « Développement d’indicateurs de la qualité biologique et du carbone organique des sols agricoles en Wallonie »
Chartin, Caroline; Krüger, Inken ULiege; Carnol, Monique ULiege et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (14 ULiège)
See detailSoil organic carbon fractionation for improving agricultural soil quality diagnosis in different management practices.
Trigalet, Sylvain; Chartin, Caroline; Krüger, Inken ULiege et al

Conference (2016)

Preserving ecosystem functions of soil organic matter (SOM) in soils is a key challenge. The need for an efficient diagnosis of SOM state in agricultural soils is a priority in order to facilitate the ... [more ▼]

Preserving ecosystem functions of soil organic matter (SOM) in soils is a key challenge. The need for an efficient diagnosis of SOM state in agricultural soils is a priority in order to facilitate the detection of changes in soil qualityas a result of changes in management practices. The nature of SOM is complex and cannot readily be monitored due to the heterogeneity of its components. Assessment of the SOM level dynamics, typically characterized as the bulk soil organic carbon (SOC), can be refined by taking into account carbon pools with different turnover rates and stability. Fractionating bulk SOC in meaningful soil organic fractions helps to better diagnose SOC status. By separating carbon associated with clay and fine silt particles (stable carbon with slow turnover rate) and carbon nonassociated with this fraction (labile and intermediate carbon with higher turnover rates), effects of management can be detected more efficiently at different spatial and temporal scales. Until now, most work on SOC fractionation has focused on small spatial scales along management or time gradients. The present case study focuses on SOC fractionation applied in order to refine the interpretation of organic matter turnover and SOC sequestration for regional units in Wallonia with comparable climate, management and, to a certain extent, soil conditions. In each unit, random samples from specific land uses are analyzed in order to assess the Normal Operative Ranges (NOR) of SOC fraction contents for each unit and land use combination. Thus, SOC levels of the different fractions of a specific field in a given unit can be compared to its corresponding NOR. It will help to better diagnose agricultural soil quality in terms of organic carbon compared to a bulk SOC diagnosis. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimating Soil Organic Carbon stocks and uncertainties for the National inventory Report - a study case in Southern Belgium
Chartin, Caroline; Stevens, Antoine; Krüger, Inken ULiege et al

Conference (2016)

As many other countries, Belgium complies with Annex I of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Belgium thus reports its annual greenhouse gas emissions in its national ... [more ▼]

As many other countries, Belgium complies with Annex I of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Belgium thus reports its annual greenhouse gas emissions in its national inventory report (NIR), with a distinction between emissions/sequestration in cropland and grassland (EU decision 529/2013). The CO2 fluxes are then based on changes in SOC stocks computed for each of these two types of landuse. These stocks are specified for each of the agricultural regions which correspond to areas with similar agricultural practices (rotations and/or livestock) and yield potentials. For Southern Belgium (Wallonia) consisting of ten agricultural regions, the Soil Monitoring Network (SMN) ‘CARBOSOL’ has been developed this last decade to survey the state of agricultural soils by quantifying SOC stocks and their evolution in a reasonable number of locations complying with the time and funds allocated. Unfortunately, the 592 points of the CARBOSOL network do not allow a representative and a sound estimation of SOC stocks and its uncertainties for the 20 possible combinations of land use/agricultural regions. Moreover, the SMN CARBIOSOL is based on a legacy database following a convenience scheme sampling strategy rather than a statistical scheme defined by design-based or model-based strategies. Here, we aim to both quantify SOC budgets (i.e. How much?) and spatialize SOC stocks (i.e. Where?) at regional scale (Southern Belgium) based on data from the SMN described above. To this end, we developed a computation procedure based on Digital Soil Mapping techniques and stochastic simulations (Monte-Carlo) allowing the estimation of multiple (10,000) independent spatialized datasets. This procedure accounts for the uncertainties associated to estimations of both i) SOC stock at the pixelscale and ii) parameters of the models. Based on these 10,000 individual realizations of the spatial model, mean SOC stocks and confidence intervals can be then computed at the pixel scale, for selected sub-areas (i.e. the 20 landuse/agricultural region combinations) and for the entire study area. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh resolution characterization of the soil organic carbon depth profile in a soil landscape affected by erosion
Jague, Emilien; Sommer, Michael; Saby, Nicolas et al

in Soil & Tillage Research (2016), 156

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (9 ULiège)
See detailProjet CARBIOSOL: Vers une cartographie des indicateurs biologiques du sol en Région wallonne
Chartin, Caroline; Krüger, Inken ULiege; Carnol, Monique ULiege et al

Speech/Talk (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (2 ULiège)
See detailIndicateurs biologiques de la qualité du sol à l'échelle régionale
Krüger, Inken ULiege; Chartin, Caroline; van Wesemael, Bas et al

Conference (2015, May 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULiège)
See detailBiological indicators of soil quality over landscape spatial scales: a case study in Southern Belgium
Krüger, Inken ULiege; Chartin, Caroline; van Wesemael, Bas et al

Conference (2014, November 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULiège)
See detailBiological indicators of soil quality over landscape spatial scales: a case study in Southern Belgium
Krüger, Inken ULiege; Chartin, Caroline; Van Wesemael, Bas et al

Poster (2014, July)

Biological indicators are organisms or biological processes whose values give quantitative information on the capacity of a soil to function. Their fast dynamic allows to detect changes on short ... [more ▼]

Biological indicators are organisms or biological processes whose values give quantitative information on the capacity of a soil to function. Their fast dynamic allows to detect changes on short timescales. Five biological indicators (basal respiration, nitrogen mineralisation, microbial carbon and nitrogen, earthworm abundance and biomass, functional microbial diversity) as well as two ecophysiological indices (microbial quotient and metabolic quotient) were tested for their power to characterize the biological soil quality on a landscape level at 60 sites in two South-Belgian landscape units were investigated. All biological indicators differed significantly between the two landscape units showing the biological indicators to be discriminatory on a landscape level. Within each landscape unit, no relationships between biological indicators were found, underlining the need to measure multiple biological indicators. The results represent the first data for a South-Belgian monitoring network of biological soil quality. [less ▲]

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See detailSoil organic carbon assessment by field and airborne spectrometry in bare croplands: accounting for soil surface roughness
Denis, Antoine ULiege; Stevens, Antoine; Van Wesemael, Bas et al

in Geoderma (2014), 226-227(August 2014), 94102

Visible, Near and Short Wave Infrared (VNSWIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (350 nm to 2500 nm) has been proven to be an efficient tool to determine the Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) content. SOC ... [more ▼]

Visible, Near and Short Wave Infrared (VNSWIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (350 nm to 2500 nm) has been proven to be an efficient tool to determine the Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) content. SOC assessment (SOCa) is usually done by using calibration samples and multivariate models. However one of the major constraints of this technique, when used in field conditions is the spatial variation in surface soil properties (soil water content, roughness, vegetation residue) which induces a spectral variability not directly related to SOC and hence reduces the SOCa accuracy. This study focuses on the impact of soil roughness on SOCa by outdoor VIS-NIR-SWIR spectroscopy and is based on the assumption that soil roughness effect can be approximated by its related shadowing effect. A new method for identifying and correcting the effect of soil shadow on reflectance spectra measured with an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer and an Airborne Hyperspectral Sensor (AHS-160) on freshly tilled fields in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg was elaborated and tested. This method is based on the shooting of soil vertical photographs in the visible spectrum and the derivation of a shadow correction factor resulting from the comparison of “reflectance” of shadowed and illuminated soil areas. Moreover, the study of laboratory ASD reflectance of shadowed soil samples showed that the influence of shadow on reflectance varies according to wavelength. Consequently a correction factor in the entire [350–2500 nm] spectral range was computed to translate this differential influence. Our results showed that SOCa was improved by 27% for field spectral data and by 25% for airborne spectral data by correcting the effect of soil relative shadow. However, compared to simple mathematical treatment of the spectra (first derivative, etc.) able to remove variation in soil albedo due to roughness, the proposed method, leads only to slightly more accurate SOCa. [less ▲]

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See detailSoil Organic Carbon mapping of partially vegetated agricultural fields with imaging spectroscopy
Bartholomeus, Harm; Kooistra, Lammert; Stevens, Antoine et al

in International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation (2011), 13(1), 81-88

Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is one of the key soil properties, but the large spatial variation makes continuous mapping a complex task. Imaging spectroscopy has proven to be an useful technique for mapping ... [more ▼]

Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is one of the key soil properties, but the large spatial variation makes continuous mapping a complex task. Imaging spectroscopy has proven to be an useful technique for mapping of soil properties, but the applicability decreases rapidly when fields are partially covered with vegetation. In this paper we show that with only a few percent fractional maize cover the accuracy of a Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) based SOC prediction model drops dramatically. However, this problem can be solved with the use of spectral unmixing techniques. First, the fractional maize cover is determined with linear spectral unmixing, taking the illumination and observation angles into account. In a next step the influence of maize is filtered out from the spectral signal by a new procedure termed Residual Spectral Unmixing (RSU). The residual soil spectra resulting from this procedure are used for mapping of SOC using PLSR, which could be done with accuracies comparable to studies performed on bare soil surfaces (Root Mean Standard Error of Calibration = 1.34 g/kg and Root Mean Standard Error of Prediction = 1.65 g/kg). With the presented RSU approach it is possible to filter out the influence of maize from the mixed spectra, and the residual soil spectra contain enough information for mapping of the SOC distribution within agricultural fields. This can improve the applicability of airborne imaging spectroscopy for soil studies in temperate climates, since the use of the RSU approach can extend the flight-window which is often constrained by the presence of vegetation. [less ▲]

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