References of "di Folco, E"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHot circumstellar material resolved around β Pic with VLTI/PIONIER
Defrère, D.; Lebreton, J.; Le Bouquin, J.-B. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 546

Aims: We aim at resolving the circumstellar environment around β Pic in the near-infrared in order to study the inner planetary system (<200 mas, i.e., ~4 AU). Methods: Precise interferometric fringe ... [more ▼]

Aims: We aim at resolving the circumstellar environment around β Pic in the near-infrared in order to study the inner planetary system (<200 mas, i.e., ~4 AU). Methods: Precise interferometric fringe visibility measurements were obtained over seven spectral channels dispersed across the H band with the four-telescope VLTI/PIONIER interferometer. Thorough analysis of interferometric data was performed to measure the stellar angular diameter and to search for circumstellar material. Results: We detected near-infrared circumstellar emission around β Pic that accounts for 1.37% ± 0.16% of the near-infrared stellar flux and that is located within the field-of-view of PIONIER (i.e., ~200 mas in radius). The flux ratio between this excess and the photosphere emission is shown to be stable over a period of 1 year and to vary only weakly across the H band, suggesting that the source is either very hot (≳1500 K) or dominated by the scattering of the stellar flux. In addition, we derive the limb-darkened angular diameter of β Pic with an unprecedented accuracy (θLD= 0.736 ± 0.019 mas). Conclusions: The presence of a small H-band excess originating in the vicinity of β Pic is revealed for the first time thanks to the high-precision visibilities enabled by VLTI/PIONIER. This excess emission is likely due to the scattering of stellar light by circumstellar dust and/or the thermal emission from a yet unknown population of hot dust, although hot gas emitting in the continuum cannot be firmly excluded. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImaging the inner regions of debris disks with near-infrared interferometry
Defrère, D.; Absil, Olivier ULg; Augereau, J. C. et al

in EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011 (2011, October 01)

Most debris disks resolved so far show extended structures located at tens to hundreds AU from the host star, and are more analogous to our solar system's dusty Kuiper belt than to the AU-scale zodiacal ... [more ▼]

Most debris disks resolved so far show extended structures located at tens to hundreds AU from the host star, and are more analogous to our solar system's dusty Kuiper belt than to the AU-scale zodiacal disk inside our solar system's asteroid belt. Over the last few years however, a few hot debris disks have been detected around a handful of main sequence stars thanks to the advance of infrared interferometry. The grain populations derived from these observations are quite intriguing, as they point towards very high dust replenishment rates, high cometary activity or major collisional events. In this talk, we review the ongoing efforts to detect bright exozodiacal disks with precision near-infrared interferometry in both hemispheres with CHARA/FLUOR and VLTI/PIONIER. We discuss preliminary statistical trends on the occurrence of bright exozodi around nearby main sequence stars and show how this information could be used to constrain the global architecture and evolution of debris disks. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHot exozodiacal dust resolved around Vega with IOTA/IONIC
Defrère, D.; Absil, Olivier ULg; Augereau, J.-C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 534

Context. Although debris discs have been detected around a significant number of main-sequence stars, only a few of them are known to harbour hot dust in their inner part where terrestrial planets may ... [more ▼]

Context. Although debris discs have been detected around a significant number of main-sequence stars, only a few of them are known to harbour hot dust in their inner part where terrestrial planets may have formed. Thanks to infrared interferometric observations, it is possible to obtain a direct measurement of these regions, which are of prime importance for preparing future exo-Earth characterisation missions. <BR /> Aims: We resolve the exozodiacal dust disc around Vega with the help of infrared stellar interferometry and estimate the integrated H-band flux originating from the first few AUs of the debris disc. <BR /> Methods: Precise H-band interferometric measurements were obtained on Vega with the 3-telescope IOTA/IONIC interferometer (Mount Hopkins, Arizona). Thorough modelling of both interferometric data (squared visibility and closure phase) and spectral energy distribution was performed to constrain the nature of the near-infrared excess emission. <BR /> Results: Resolved circumstellar emission within ~6 AU from Vega is identified at the 3-σ level. The most straightforward scenario consists in a compact dust disc producing a thermal emission that is largely dominated by small grains located between 0.1 and 0.3 AU from Vega and accounting for 1.23 ± 0.45% of the near-infrared stellar flux for our best-fit model. This flux ratio is shown to vary slightly with the geometry of the model used to fit our interferometric data (variations within ± 0.19%). <BR /> Conclusions: The presence of hot exozodiacal dust in the vicinity of Vega, initially revealed by K-band CHARA/FLUOR observations, is confirmed by our H-band IOTA/IONIC measurements. Whereas the origin of the dust is still uncertain, its presence and the possible connection with the outer disc suggest that the Vega system is currently undergoing major dynamical perturbations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 ULg)
See detailStudying debris disks with near‐infrared interferometry
Absil, Olivier ULg; Augereau, J.-C.; Le Bouquin, J.-B. et al

Conference (2011, April 13)

In this talk, I will describe and illustrate two different ways in which near-infrared stellar interferometry can be used to constrain the nature and physics of debris disks, and help understand the ... [more ▼]

In this talk, I will describe and illustrate two different ways in which near-infrared stellar interferometry can be used to constrain the nature and physics of debris disks, and help understand the global architecture of planetary systems in general. In the first part of the talk, I will review the on-going efforts to detect bright exozodiacal disks with precision near-infrared interferometry. I will describe the results of the exozodi survey that we are currently carrying out at the CHARA array, and briefly discuss our first results and perspectives with the new PIONIER instrument at the VLTI (including the identification of previously unknown low-mass companions). Preliminary statistical trends on the occurrence of bright exozodi around nearby main sequence stars will be presented, and I will discuss how this information could be used to constrain the global architecture and evolution of debris disks. In the second part of the talk, I will focus on our on-going project to characterize the “spin-orbit” alignment of resolved debris disks with the rotation axis of their (rapidly rotating) host star. Our first result obtained with the VLTI/AMBER spectro-interferometer on Fomalhaut will be presented, as well as its possible consequences on the dynamics of the planetary system and on the physics of the grains composing the Fomalhaut dust ring. I will then briefly describe the status and perspectives of this project. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailExozodiacal discs with ALADDIN: how faint can we detect them?
Absil, Olivier ULg; Coudé Du Foresto; Barillot, M. et al

in Spinoglio, L.; Epchtein, N. (Eds.) 3rd ARENA Conference: An Astronomical Observatory at CONCORDIA (Dome C, Antarctica) (2010)

In this paper, we describe the expected performance of ALADDIN, a nulling interferometer project optimised for operation at Dome C. After reviewing the main atmospheric parameters pertaining to infrared ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we describe the expected performance of ALADDIN, a nulling interferometer project optimised for operation at Dome C. After reviewing the main atmospheric parameters pertaining to infrared interferometry on the high Antarctic plateau, we shortly describe the ALADDIN instrument and compute its estimated performance in terms of the smallest exozodiacal dust disc density that can be detected. Our estimations are based on a thorough end-to-end software simulator previously developed for the GENIE nulling interferometer project at VLTI. We then propose a possible mission scenario, where the southern target stars of future exo-Earth characterisation missions can be surveyed for the presence of bright exozodiacal discs (>50 zodi) within one winter-over at Concordia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDust in the inner regions of debris disks around A stars
Akeson, R. L.; Ciardi, D. R.; Millan-Gabet, R. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 691

We present infrared interferometric observations of the inner regions of two A-star debris disks, beta Leo and zeta Lep, using the FLUOR instrument at the CHARA interferometer on both short (30 m) and ... [more ▼]

We present infrared interferometric observations of the inner regions of two A-star debris disks, beta Leo and zeta Lep, using the FLUOR instrument at the CHARA interferometer on both short (30 m) and long (> 200 m) baselines. For the target stars, the short-baseline visibilities are lower than expected for the stellar photosphere alone, while those of a check star, delta Leo, are not. We interpret this visibility offset of a few percent as a near-infrared (NIR) excess arising from dust grains which, due to the instrumental field of view, must be located within several AU of the central star. For beta Leo, the NIR excess-producing grains are spatially distinct from the dust which produces the previously known mid-infrared (MIR) excess. For zeta Lep, the NIR excess may be spatially associated with the MIR excess-producing material. We present simple geometric models which are consistent with the NIR and MIR excesses and show that for both objects, the NIR-producing material is most consistent with a thin ring of dust near the sublimation radius, with typical grain sizes smaller than the nominal radiation pressure blowout radius. Finally, we discuss possible origins of the NIR-emitting dust in the context of debris disk evolution models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTW ;Hydrae: evidence of stellar spots instead of a Hot Jupiter
Huélamo, N.; Figueira, P.; Bonfils, X. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 489

Context: TW Hya is a classical T Tauri star that shows significant radial-velocity variations in the optical regime. These variations have been attributed to a 10 M_Jup planet orbiting the star at 0.04 AU ... [more ▼]

Context: TW Hya is a classical T Tauri star that shows significant radial-velocity variations in the optical regime. These variations have been attributed to a 10 M_Jup planet orbiting the star at 0.04 AU. Aims: The aim of this letter is to confirm the presence of the giant planet around TW Hya by (i) testing whether the observed RV variations can be caused by stellar spots and (ii) analyzing new optical and infrared data to detect the signal of the planet companion. Methods: We fitted the RV variations of TW Hya using a cool spot model. In addition, we obtained new high-resolution optical & infrared spectra, together with optical photometry of TW Hya and compared them with previous data. Results: Our model shows that a cold spot covering 7% of the stellar surface and located at a latitude of 54° can reproduce the reported RV variations. The model also predicts a bisector semi-amplitude variation <10 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP], which is less than the errors of the RV measurements discussed in Setiawan et al. (2008, Nature, 451, 38). The analysis of our new optical RV data, with typical errors of 10 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP], shows a larger RV amplitude that varies depending on the correlation mask used. A slight correlation between the RV variation and the bisector is also observed although not at a very significant level. The infrared H-band RV curve is almost flat, showing a small variation (<35 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]) that is not consistent with the published optical orbit. All these results support the spot scenario rather than the presence of a hot Jupiter. Finally, the photometric data shows a 20% (peak to peak) variability, which is much larger than the 4% variation expected for the modeled cool spot. The fact that the optical data are correlated with the surface of the cross-correlation function points towards hot spots as being responsible for the photometric variability. Conclusions: We conclude that the best explanation for the RV signal observed in TW Hya is the presence of a cool stellar spot and not an orbiting hot Jupiter. Based on observations taken at the VLT (Paranal), under programs 280.C-5064(A) and 075.C-0202(A), and with the CORALIE spectrograph and EulerCAM both at the Euler Swiss telescope (La Silla). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA near-infrared interferometric survey of debris disc stars. II. CHARA/FLUOR observations of six early-type dwarfs
Absil, Olivier ULg; di Folco, E.; Mérand, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 487

Aims. We aim at directly detecting the presence of optically thin circumstellar dust emission within the terrestrial planetary zone around main sequence stars known to harbour cold debris discs. The ... [more ▼]

Aims. We aim at directly detecting the presence of optically thin circumstellar dust emission within the terrestrial planetary zone around main sequence stars known to harbour cold debris discs. The present study focuses on a sample of six bright A- and early F-type stars. Methods: High-precision interferometric observations have been obtained in the near-infrared K band with the FLUOR instrument installed on the CHARA Array. The measured squared visibilities are compared to the expected visibility of the stellar photospheres based on theoretical photospheric models taking into account rotational distortion. We search for potential visibility reduction at short baselines, a direct piece of evidence for resolved circumstellar emission. Results: Our observations bring to light the presence of resolved circumstellar emission around one of the six target stars (zeta Aql) at the 5sigma level. The morphology of the emission source cannot be directly constrained because of the sparse spatial frequency sampling of our interferometric data. Using complementary adaptive optics observations and radial velocity measurements, we find that the presence of a low-mass companion is a likely origin for the excess emission. The potential companion is characterised by a K-band contrast of four magnitudes. It has a most probable mass of about 0.6~Msun and is expected to orbit between about 5.5 AU and 8 AU from its host star assuming a purely circular orbit. Nevertheless, by adjusting a physical debris disc model to the observed Spectral Energy Distribution of the zeta Aql system, we also show that the presence of hot dust within 10 AU from zeta Aql, producing a total thermal emission equal to 1.69 ± 0.31% of the photospheric flux in the K band, is another viable explanation for the observed near-infrared excess. Our re-interpretation of archival near- to far-infrared photometric measurements shows however that cold dust is not present around zeta Aql at the sensitivity limit of the IRS and MIPS instruments onboard Spitzer, and urges us to remove zeta Aql from the category of bona fide debris disc stars. Conclusions: The hot debris disc around Vega (Absil et al. 2006) currently remains our only secure resolved detection within the context of this survey, with six genuine early-type debris disc stars observed so far. Further observations will be needed to assess whether zeta Aql also belongs to this hot debris disc category. Partly based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, under program IDs 073.C-0733, 077.C-0295 and 080.C-0712. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailInterferometric Constraints on Gravity Darkening with Application to the Modeling of Spica A & B
Aufdenberg, J. P.; Ireland, M. J.; Mérand, A. et al

in Hartkopf, W. I.; Guinan, E. F.; Harmanec, P. (Eds.) Binary Stars as Critical Tools & Tests in Contemporary Astrophysics (2007, August 01)

In 2005 we obtained very precise interferometric measurements of the pole-on rapid rotator Vega (A0 V) with the longest baselines of the Center for High Angular Angular Resolution (CHARA) Array and the ... [more ▼]

In 2005 we obtained very precise interferometric measurements of the pole-on rapid rotator Vega (A0 V) with the longest baselines of the Center for High Angular Angular Resolution (CHARA) Array and the Fiber Linked Unit for Optical Recombination (FLUOR). For the analysis of these data, we developed a code for mapping sophisticated PHOENIX model atmospheres on to the surface of rotationally distorted stars described by a Roche-von Zeipel formalism. Given a setof input parameters for a star or binary pair, this code predicts the interferometric visibility, spectral energy distribution and high-resolution line spectrum expected for the system. For the gravity-darkened Vega, our model provides a very good match to the K-band interferometric data, a good match to the spectral energy distribution -- except below 160 nm -- and a rather poor match to weak lines in the high dispersion spectrum where the model appears overly gravity darkened. In 2006, we used the CHARA Array and FLUOR to obtain high precision measurements of the massive, non-eclipsing, double-line spectroscopic binary Spica, a 4-day period system where both components are gravity darkened rapid rotators. These data supplement recent data obtained with the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer. Our study follows the classic 1971 study by Herbison-Evans et al. who resolved Spica as a binary with the Narrabri Intensity Interferometer. We will report on our progress modelling the new interferometric and archival spectroscopic data, with the goal towards better constraining the apsidal constant. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe Faint Hot Component of Debris Disks Revealed by Infrared Interferometry
di Folco, E.; Absil, Olivier ULg; Augereau, J.-C. et al

Conference (2007, June 01)

Very few main-sequence stars exhibit warm dust in their 5-10AU close environment, where terrestrial planets are expected to have formed. Near-infrared interferometry is a powerful means, combining high ... [more ▼]

Very few main-sequence stars exhibit warm dust in their 5-10AU close environment, where terrestrial planets are expected to have formed. Near-infrared interferometry is a powerful means, combining high dynamic range and high spatial resolution, to directly detect faint emission from hot grains in exozodiacal clouds. We will review the results of our search for 2 micron excesses around Vega-like stars, including the nearby Sun-like stars Tau Ceti and Epsilon Eridani, with the FLUOR interferometric instrument and the CHARA Array of telescopes. Our recent detections, combined with Spitzer observations around 10 micron, put strong constrains on the properties and distribution of hot grains in these inner planetary systems. We will present the conclusions of our preliminary modeling for the detected hot grains as well as their implication for the selection of targets for future planet finding missions like DARWIN or TPF. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFirst Results from the CHARA Array. VII. Long-Baseline Interferometric Measurements of Vega Consistent with a Pole-On, Rapidly Rotating Star
Aufdenberg, J. P.; Mérand, A.; Coudé du Foresto, V. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2006), 645

We have obtained high-precision interferometric measurements of Vega with the CHARA Array and FLUOR beam combiner in the K' band at projected baselines between 103 and 273 m. The measured visibility ... [more ▼]

We have obtained high-precision interferometric measurements of Vega with the CHARA Array and FLUOR beam combiner in the K' band at projected baselines between 103 and 273 m. The measured visibility amplitudes beyond the first lobe are significantly weaker than expected for a slowly rotating star characterized by a single effective temperature and surface gravity. Our measurements, when compared to synthetic visibilities and synthetic spectrophotometry from a Roche-von Zeipel gravity-darkened model atmosphere, provide strong evidence for the model of Vega as a rapidly rotating star viewed very nearly pole-on. Our best-fitting model indicates that Vega is rotating at ~91% of its angular break-up rate with an equatorial velocity of 275 km s[SUP]-1[/SUP]. Together with the measured vsini, this velocity yields an inclination for the rotation axis of 5deg. For this model the pole-to-equator effective temperature difference is ~2250 K, a value much larger than previously derived from spectral line analyses. A polar effective temperature of 10,150 K is derived from a fit to ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry. The synthetic and observed spectral energy distributions are in reasonable agreement longward of 140 nm, where they agree to 5% or better. Shortward of 140 nm, the model is up to 10 times brighter than observed. The model has a luminosity of ~37 L[SUB]solar[/SUB], a value 35% lower than Vega's apparent luminosity based on its bolometric flux and parallax, assuming a slowly rotating star. Our model predicts the spectral energy distribution of Vega as viewed from its equatorial plane, and it may be employed in radiative models for the surrounding debris disk. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCircumstellar material in the Vega inner system revealed by CHARA/FLUOR
Absil, Olivier ULg; di Folco, E.; Mérand, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2006), 452

Context: Only a handful of debris disks have been imaged up to now. Due to the need for high dynamic range and high angular resolution, very little is known about the inner planetary region, where small ... [more ▼]

Context: Only a handful of debris disks have been imaged up to now. Due to the need for high dynamic range and high angular resolution, very little is known about the inner planetary region, where small amounts of warm dust are expected to be found. Aims: We investigate the close neighbourhood of Vega with the help of infrared stellar interferometry and estimate the integrated K-band flux originating from the central 8 AU of the debris disk. Methods: We performed precise visibility measurements at both short (~30 m) and long (~150 m) baselines with the FLUOR beam-combiner installed at the CHARA Array (Mt Wilson, California) in order to separately resolve the emissions from the extended debris disk (short baselines) and from the stellar photosphere (long baselines). Results: After revising Vega's K-band angular diameter (theta_UD = 3.202 ± 0.005 mas), we show that a significant deficit in squared visibility (Delta V[SUP]2[/SUP] = 1.88 ± 0.34%) is detected at short baselines with respect to the best-fit uniform disk stellar model. This deficit can be either attributed to the presence of a low-mass stellar companion around Vega, or as the signature of the thermal and scattered emissions from the debris disk. We show that the presence of a close companion is highly unlikely, as well as other possible perturbations (stellar morphology, calibration), and deduce that we have most probably detected the presence of dust in the close neighbourhood of Vega. The resulting flux ratio between the stellar photosphere and the debris disk amounts to 1.29 ± 0.19% within the FLUOR field-of-view (~7.8 AU). Finally, we complement our K-band study with archival photometric and interferometric data in order to evaluate the main physical properties of the inner dust disk. The inferred properties suggest that the Vega system could be currently undergoing major dynamical perturbations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (7 ULg)
See detailInfrared Interferometric Gravity Darkening Observations of Vega with CHARA/FLUOR
Aufdenberg, J.; Mérand, A.; Coudé Du Foresto, V. et al

in Coudé du Foresto, Vincent; Rouan, Daniel; Rousset, Gérard (Eds.) Visions for Infrared Astronomy (2006, March)

We have obtained high-precision measurements of Vega at projected baselines between 103 m and 273 m with the CHARA Array using the (FLUOR) beam combiner in the K' band. A strongly gravity-darkened model ... [more ▼]

We have obtained high-precision measurements of Vega at projected baselines between 103 m and 273 m with the CHARA Array using the (FLUOR) beam combiner in the K' band. A strongly gravity-darkened model atmosphere is in general agreement with both our interferometric data and archival spectrophotometry. This model indicates that Vega is rotating at 91%ofitsangular break-uprateandthatthepole-to-equator effectivetemperaturedifference is 2250 K. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)