References of "de Nijs, Laurence"
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See detailMyoclonin1/EFHC1 in cell division, neuroblast migration, synapse/dendrite formation in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy
Grisar, Thierry ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; de Nijs, Laurence ULg et al

in Noebels, JL; Avoli, M; Rogawski, MA (Eds.) et al Jasper's Basic Mechanisms of the Epilepsies, 4th edition (2012)

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See detailDistribution of EFHC1 or myoclonin 1 in mouse neural structures
Leon, Christine ULg; de Nijs, Laurence ULg; Chanas, Grazyna et al

in Epilepsy Research (2010), 88

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See detailCytoskeletal genes and idiopathic epilepsies
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; de Nijs, Laurence ULg; Leon, Christine et al

in Schwartzkroin, A. (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Basic Epilepsy Research (2009)

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See detailEFHC1 interacts with microtubules to regulate cell division and cortical development
de Nijs, Laurence ULg; Leon, Christine ULg; Nguyen, Laurent ULg et al

in Nature Neuroscience (2009), 12(10), 1266-74

Mutations in the EFHC1 gene are linked to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), one of the most frequent forms of idiopathic generalized epilepsies. JME is associated with subtle alterations of cortical and ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the EFHC1 gene are linked to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), one of the most frequent forms of idiopathic generalized epilepsies. JME is associated with subtle alterations of cortical and subcortical architecture, but the underlying pathological mechanism remains unknown. We found that EFHC1 is a microtubule-associated protein involved in the regulation of cell division. In vitro, EFHC1 loss of function disrupted mitotic spindle organization, impaired M phase progression, induced microtubule bundling and increased apoptosis. EFHC1 impairment in the rat developing neocortex by ex vivo and in utero electroporation caused a marked disruption of radial migration. We found that this effect was a result of cortical progenitors failing to exit the cell cycle and defects in the radial glia scaffold organization and in the locomotion of postmitotic neurons. Therefore, we propose that EFHC1 is a regulator of cell division and neuronal migration during cortical development and that disruption of its functions leads to JME [less ▲]

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See detailEFHC1, a protein mutated in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, associates with the mitotic spindle through its N-terminus
de Nijs, Laurence ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg et al

in Experimental Cell Research (2006), 312(15), 2872-2879

A novel gene, EFHC1, mutated in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) encodes a protein with three DM10 domains of unknown function and one putative EF-hand motif. To study the properties of EFHC1, we ... [more ▼]

A novel gene, EFHC1, mutated in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) encodes a protein with three DM10 domains of unknown function and one putative EF-hand motif. To study the properties of EFHC1, we expressed EGFP-tagged protein in various cell lines. In interphase cells, the fusion protein was present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus with specific accumulation at the centrosome. During mitosis EGFP-EFHC1 colocalized with the mitotic spindle, especially at spindle poles and with the midbody during cytokinesis. Using a specific antibody, we demonstrated the same distribution of the endogenous protein. Deletion analyses revealed that the N-terminal region of EFHC1 is crucial for the association with the mitotic spindle and the midbody. Our results suggest that EFHC1 could play an important role during cell division. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSome genetic and biochemical aspects of myoclonus
Grisar, Thierry ULg; de Nijs, Laurence ULg; Chanas, G. et al

in Neurophysiologie Clinique = Clinical Neurophysiology (2006), 36(5-6, Sep-Dec), 271-279

Can a gene defect be responsible for the occurrence in an individual, at a particular age, of such a muscle twitch followed by relaxation called: "myoclonus" and defined as sudden, brief, shock-like ... [more ▼]

Can a gene defect be responsible for the occurrence in an individual, at a particular age, of such a muscle twitch followed by relaxation called: "myoclonus" and defined as sudden, brief, shock-like movements? Genetic defects could indeed determine a subsequent cascade of molecular events (caused by abnormal encoded proteins) that would produce new aberrant cellular relationships in a particular area of the CNS leading to re-builded "myoclonogenic" neuronal networks. This can be illustrated reviewing some inherited neurological entities that are characterized by a predominant myoclonic picture and among which a clear gene defect has been identified. In the second part of this chapter, we will also propose a new point of view on how some structural genes could, under certain conditions, when altered, produced idiopathic generalized epilepsy with myoclonic jerks, taking juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) and the myoclonin (EFHC-1) gene as examples. (c) 2007 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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