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See detailComparison of the sedative and hemodynamic effects of acepromazine and promethazine in the standing horse.
Pequito, Manuel; Amory, Hélène ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg et al

in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (2012), 32(12), 1-6

The objective of this study was to compare the sedative and peripheral hemodynamic effects of acepromazine (ACP) and promethazine (PTZ) in the standing healthy horse. Nine healthy Warmblood horses ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to compare the sedative and peripheral hemodynamic effects of acepromazine (ACP) and promethazine (PTZ) in the standing healthy horse. Nine healthy Warmblood horses randomly received either intravenous ACP at 0.1 mg/kg or PTZ at 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg. A sedation score based on clinical examination was recorded, and systolic arterial blood pressure was noninvasively evaluated using a Doppler flow detector at the tail, just before and every 15 minutes until 60 minutes after drug injection. Hemodynamics of the median artery of the left forelimb was studied using Doppler ultrasonography just before and 45 minutes after injection of the drug, which allowed calculation of surface (SURF), diameter (DIAM), and circumference (CIRC) of the vessel and peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity (EDV), mean velocity (MV), volumetric flow (VF), and resistivity index (RI) of the blood flow. Regardless of the dose used, PTZ had lesser sedative and hypotensive effects than ACP at 0.1 mg/kg and did not induce significant variations in SURF, DIAM, CIRC, PSV, EDV, MV, VF, and RI of the studied standing horses. Conversely, the vasodilatory properties of ACP were illustrated by a significant increase in SURF, DIAM, CIRC, PSV, EDV, MV, and VF and a significant reduction of the RI. Unlike ACP, PTZ did not induce alterations on the morphology of the Doppler waveform. PTZ appears to have less sedative and peripheral vasodilator effects than ACP, thus it could be safer than ACP in patients suffering from hypotension. [less ▲]

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See detailReversal of acepromazine-induced hemodynamic alterations by norepinephrine in standing horses
pequito, Manuel; Amory, Hélène ULg; Peters, Fabrice et al

Poster (2011, March 18)

Acepromazine (ACP) is a phenothiazine commonly used to sedate horses. Additionally, ACP exerts strong anti-inflammatory effects, which might have a therapeutic potential in horses suffering from systemic ... [more ▼]

Acepromazine (ACP) is a phenothiazine commonly used to sedate horses. Additionally, ACP exerts strong anti-inflammatory effects, which might have a therapeutic potential in horses suffering from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). However, the ACP-induced vasodilation precludes its use in horses with SIRS-related cardiovascular compromise. The objective of this study was to test if the hemodynamic effects of the administration of 0,1 mg/kg of ACP could be counteracted by an intravenous infusion of norepinephrine (NOR) at 1ug/kg/min in healthy horses. In 5 healthy adult horses, a 15 minutes NOR IV infusion was administered 45 minutes after an injection of 0,1 mg/kg of ACP IV. The systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) was non-invasively measured by Doppler sphingometry at the tail. Hemodynamics of the median artery of the left forelimb were studied using Doppler ultrasonography, through calculation of the vessel’s surface (SURF), diameter (DIAM), circumference (CIRC), and peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity (EDV), mean velocity (MV), volumetric flow (VF) and resistivity index (RI) of the flow. Both SAP and Doppler parameters were determined at regular intervals during the entire study. ACP induced a hypotension and a vasodilatation, that were evidenced by a significant rise of the SURF, DIAM, CIRC, PSV, EDV, MV and VF and reduction of the SAP and RI. During NOR infusion, all these ACP-induced hemodynamic changes were reversed. These findings suggest that a continuous IV NOR infusion at 1ug/kg/min is able to revert ACP-induced hypotension and vasodilation in healthy adult horses. [less ▲]

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See detailThe oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium in horses
Kirschvink, Nathalie; de Moffarts, Brieuc; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Veterinary Journal (2008), 177(2), 178-191

Since "free radical research" started in 1954, understanding the role of oxidants and antioxidants in physiological and pathological conditions has increased continuously. Oxidants are essentially ... [more ▼]

Since "free radical research" started in 1954, understanding the role of oxidants and antioxidants in physiological and pathological conditions has increased continuously. Oxidants are essentially generated by metabolic enzymes, inflammatory cells and mitochondrial electron leakage; they are indispensable for the cellular redox regulation and may, under certain conditions, have a pro-inflammatory stimulatory role. Endogenous and exogenous antioxidants counterbalance the oxidative processes and so maintain the oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium. Excessive oxidant generation or antioxidant insufficiency can lead to oxidative stress. The aims of this review are: (1) to provide an insight into the concept of the oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium by briefly introducing the oxidant and the antioxidant systems; (2) to describe how the oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium or oxidative stress can be evaluated in horses, and (3) to summarise current knowledge about oxidative stress in equine medicine and equine exercise physiology. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of exercise and oral antioxidant supplementation enriched in (n-3) fatty acids on blood oxidant markers and erythrocyte membrane fluidity in horses
De Moffarts, Brieuc; Portier, Karine; Kirschvink, Nathalie et al

in Veterinary Journal (2007), 174(1), 113-121

The aim of this study was to investigate in a placebo-controlled field study the effect of a (n - 3)-vitamin supplementation on erythrocyte membrane fluidity (ENIF), oxidant/antioxidant markers and ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to investigate in a placebo-controlled field study the effect of a (n - 3)-vitamin supplementation on erythrocyte membrane fluidity (ENIF), oxidant/antioxidant markers and plasmatic omega 3/omega 6 fatty acid ratio (FAR) in 12 eventing horses. Venous blood was sampled at rest before (PRE) and after (POST) a three week treatment period with either the supplement (group S, n = 6) or a placebo (group P, n = 6) as well as after 15 min (POST E15') and 24 h (POST E24h) after a standardised exercise test. The following markers were analysed: EMF, plasma antioxidant capacity of water and lipid soluble components, ascorbic acid, uric acid (UA), glutathione (reduced: GSH, oxidised: GSSG), vitamin E (Vit E), beta-carotene, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, selenium, copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), oxidised proteins (Protox), lipid peroxides (Pool) and FAR. EMF did not differ between group S and P after treatment, but GPx remained unchanged in group S whereas it decreased in group P and plasma Cu/Zn ratio remained unchanged whereas it increased in group P. FAR were significantly increased in group S. Exercise induced a significant decrease of EMF (POST vs. E24h) in both groups, but which was significantly lower at E15' in group S than in group P. Exercise induced a significant increase of UA and ACW (POST vs. E15') and Protox (POST vs. E24h) in both groups. An exercise-related decrease in GSH and Pool (POST vs. E15') was found in group P, whereas Vit E and FAR (POST vs. E24h) significantly decreased in both groups. The study showed that exercise induced a decrease in ENIF in horses associated with changes of blood oxidative balance. The (omega-3)vitamin supplementation tested improved the oxidative balance poorly but delayed the exercise-induced decrease of EMF and increased the FAR. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of exercise and training on oxygen transport in healthy standardbred horses
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Cambier, Carole ULg; de Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2007), 21

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See detailEffect of exercise on blood oxidant/antioxidant markers in standardbred horses: comparison between treadmill and race track tests.
de Moffarts, Brieuc; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (2006), (36), 254-257

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Interest in establishing oxidant/ antioxidant profiles in competition horses is increasing. Earlier studies performed in horses have mainly been performed under laboratory ... [more ▼]

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Interest in establishing oxidant/ antioxidant profiles in competition horses is increasing. Earlier studies performed in horses have mainly been performed under laboratory conditions using a treadmill and it is not known to what extent laboratory results of oxidant/antioxidant studies might be transposed to field conditions. OBJECTIVE: To compare the impact on the blood oxidant/ antioxidant status of a standardised exercise test including a run up to fatigue performed on a treadmill (TM) and on a racetrack (RT) in healthy and trained Standardbred horses. MATERIAL AND METHODS: During TM and RT tests the following blood antioxidant markers were analysed in jugular venous blood at rest and 15 mins (E15) after an intense bout of exercise: uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione (reduced: GSH and oxidised: GSSG), glutathione redox ratio (GRR) and protein thiol (PSH). Running time to fatigue (RTF), velocity during the last exercise stage (Vmax), final heart rate (HRfinal) and venous lactic acid (LA) were also recorded. RESULTS: Vmax was significantly (P<0.05) higher during the RT, whereas LA was significantly lower. HRfinal and RTF did not differ significantly between TM and RT. Exercise induced a significant increase (R vs. E15) of UA and AA in both tests, whereas GSH and PSH decreased significantly. GPx, SOD, GSSG and GRR remained unchanged. Differences between TM and RT were significant at E15 for UA, AA and PSH. CONCLUSIONS: Comparison of oxidant/antioxidant profiles from laboratory and field studies are difficult to standardise and should be interpreted with caution. POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: For the same RTF and final HR, the TM induced stronger changes in blood lactate and in blood oxidant/antioxidant balance than did RT. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of blood oxidant/antioxidant markers in healthy competition horses of different breeds
Kirschvink, Nathalie; de Moffarts, Brieuc; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (2006), 36

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: There is increasing evidence that the equine athlete is exposed to exercise-induced changes of its oxidant/antioxidant balance and antioxidant supplementation is frequently ... [more ▼]

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: There is increasing evidence that the equine athlete is exposed to exercise-induced changes of its oxidant/antioxidant balance and antioxidant supplementation is frequently recommended. However, it is unknown whether there is a specific need for antioxidants according to performance, breed, gender or age. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether breed-, gender- and age-related differences of blood oxidant/antioxidant markers occur in competition horses. METHODS: Healthy horses (n = 493) underwent oxidant/ antioxidant blood marker determination. Vitamin E, lipophilic antioxidant capacity (ACL), ascorbic acid (AA), glutathione (GSH, GSSG), gluthione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), selenium (Se), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lipid peroxides (Pool), oxidised proteins (Protox) were determined, as well as magnesium (Mg), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), packed cell volume (PCV) and haemoglobin (Hb). A mixed linear model assessed the effect of breed, gender and age category. P<0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Thoroughbreds showed the highest values of vitamin E, ACL, GPx, PCV and Hb, whilst standardbreds had the highest values of AA and LDH. Jumping horses had the highest Protox values. Females had significantly higher SOD values, whereas most of the other markers were higher in stallions and geldings. Horses age 2-6 years had higher AA, SOD and LDH values than horses age >6 years. Correlation analyses were positive and significant between vitamin E and GPx, VitE and ACL, Se and GPx, Cu and Pool and negative between Pool and vitamin E, Pool and ACL, Protox and GPx, Protox and vitamin E. CONCLUSIONS: Blood oxidant/ antioxidant status of horses is influenced by breed, gender and age. The correlation analyses suggest synergistic relations between GPx, vitamin E and Se and an antagonistic relation between Protox-GPx, Protox-vitamin E, and Pool-vitamin E. POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: The results of this investigation provide definition of the specific need for antioxidants and vitamins in competition horses. [less ▲]

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See detailUtilisation d'un concentré riche en fibres pour la prévention des crises chez le cheval poussif
Bedoret, Denis; de Moffarts, Brieuc; Van Erck, Emmanuelle et al

in Pratique Vétérinaire Equine (2006), 38(149), 57-64

"Heaves" is a recurrent allergic inflammatory disease initiated by inhalation of organic dust from hay and litter. Reduction in exposure to dust is the basis of prevention and treatment of attacks in ... [more ▼]

"Heaves" is a recurrent allergic inflammatory disease initiated by inhalation of organic dust from hay and litter. Reduction in exposure to dust is the basis of prevention and treatment of attacks in horses. Substitution of hay by wilted grass silage is recommended but is often not given because of the required high work load and possible risk of botulism. An alternative is the use of fibrous food without forage. Nine "heave" horses were placed in two groups at random. One group received concentrate enriched with short-strand lucerne for six weeks and the other group the reference feed consisting of silage based concentrate. After a period of recovery, the protocol was repeated and the groups reversed. Respiratory and circulatory functions, degree of fatness, feeding time and consumption of water were evaluated. No significant difference in respiratory and circulatory parameters was observed. The feeding time was significantly higher for concentrate enriched with lucerne fibers. A concentrate rich in fibers may limit attacks as does silage, which has risks associated with consumption [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of a portable equine metabolic measurement system
Duvivier, V. H.; Van Erck, Emmanuelle; De Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in 7th International Conference on Equine Exercise Physiology (2006)

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See detailValidation of a portable equine metabolic measurement system
Art, Tatiana ULg; Duvivier, D. H.; van Erck, Emmanuelle et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (2006), 36

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: In equine sports medicine, VO2 has been measured exclusively with stationary systems, in laboratories equipped with a treadmill. Measurement during exercise in field ... [more ▼]

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: In equine sports medicine, VO2 has been measured exclusively with stationary systems, in laboratories equipped with a treadmill. Measurement during exercise in field conditions has not previously been reported because of the lack of portable equipment designed for horses. OBJECTIVES: A commercially available portable metabolic measurement system, based on breath-to-breath gas analysis and flow spirometry, was adapted to the horse's physiology and morphology (Cosmed K4b2 and Equimask) and its validity tested by (1) repeatability of the measures and (2) comparing metabolic data to those obtained by a reference method (RM). METHODS: To test the reproducibility of the measurements, 5 healthy saddle horses were subjected twice at 2 day intervals to a similar submaximal standardised incremental exercise test on a treadmill. The same horses performed twice at one week interval an incremental treadmill test to fatigue: the oxygen consumption and ventilation were measured once with the K4b2 system and once with the RM. The metabolic and ventilatory data obtained with both systems were compared. RESULTS: There was a good reproducibility of the metabolic measurements obtained by the K4b2 system at any workload. The VO2 obtained by both systems at any workload was not significantly different. However, the K4b2 expired fraction in CO2 (FETCO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) were significantly lower at high and at maximal workloads. As a consequence, the values of the respiratory exchange ratio were too low and incompatible with normal physiological values. CONCLUSIONS: The good reproducibility of the metabolic and ventilatory measurements and the fact that the VO2 measurements at any workload were similar to the data obtained with the reference method suggested that this system may be used for comparison of repeated VO2 measurements in practical field conditions. POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: The K4b2 system could be used to improve knowledge of the energetic cost in different equine sports disciplines and offer the opportunity to undertake performance tests with genuine track conditions, on ridden or harnessed horses, rather than under laboratory conditions [less ▲]

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See detailMyeloperoxidase concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from healthy horses and those with recurrent airway obstruction
Art, Tatiana ULg; Franck, Thierry ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg et al

in Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research = Revue Canadienne de Recherche Vétérinaire (2006), 70(4), 291-296

The aim of this work was to measure the myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid collected from horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), both in crisis and in ... [more ▼]

The aim of this work was to measure the myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid collected from horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), both in crisis and in remission, as well as from healthy horses. Seven horses with RAO were exposed to moldy hay until the maximum change in pleural pressure was greater than 1.5 kPa. At that point, BAL was performed, and the total cell counts and percentages in the fluid were immediately determined. To measure the MPO concentration in BAL-fluid supernatant, we used a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with polyclonal antibodies against equine MPO. The tests were repeated on the horses with RAO after they had spent 2 mo on pasture. Six healthy horses serving as controls underwent the same tests. The absolute and relative neutrophil counts and the MPO concentration in the BAL fluid were significantly greater in the horses with an RAO crisis than in the control horses. After 2 mo on pasture, the horses that had been in RAO crisis were clinically normal, and their neutrophil counts and MPO levels in BAL fluid had significantly decreased; during remission their neutrophil counts were not significantly different from those in the healthy horses, but their MPO concentration remained significantly higher. This study showed that determining the MPO concentration in a horse's BAL fluid is technically possible and that during remission from RAO the concentration remains higher than normal. Thus, MPO may be a marker of neutrophil presence and activation in the lower airways. [less ▲]

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See detailEquine oesophageal obstruction : a retrospective study on 143 cases
Seguin, A; Peters, F; Lopez, D et al

in Proceedings of the 45th Congress of the British Equine Veterinary Association (2006)

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See detailEffect of Beclomethasone Dipropionate and Dexamethasone Isonicotinate on Lung Function, Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Cytology, and Transcription Factor Expression in Airways of Horses with Recurrent Airway Obstruction
Couetil, L.; Art, Tatiana ULg; de Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2006), 20

Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is recognized to be effective for the treatment of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) in horses. Anti-inflammatory properties of GC are thought to be mediated by suppression of ... [more ▼]

Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is recognized to be effective for the treatment of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) in horses. Anti-inflammatory properties of GC are thought to be mediated by suppression of inflammatory gene expression via inhibition of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-dose inhaled beclomethasone dipropionate and injectable dexamethasone 21- isonicotinate on clinical signs, pulmonary function, airway cytology, and activity of NF-kB and AP-1 in bronchial cells of RAO-affected horses. Seven horses with RAO were exposed to moldy hay until they developed airway obstruction on 3 separate occasions. In a crossover design, they were then treated with a placebo (injection on day 1), inhaled beclomethasone (500 mg q12h for 10 days), or dexamethasone (0.06 mg/kg, IM on day 1) and monitored for 10 days. Pulmonary function, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology, and NF-kB and AP-1 activity in bronchial brushing cells were measured before (day 1) and after treatment (day 10). Treatment with beclomethasone resulted in significantly improved pulmonary function of RAOaffected horses compared with placebo and dexamethasone treatments. However, none of the treatments had an effect on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology or NF-kB and AP-1 activity. These findings reveal that, in a model of severe RAO, the benefits of low-dose inhaled beclomethasone on pulmonary function are not accompanied by a decrease in airway inflammatory cells or a suppression of transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1 DNA-binding activity. [less ▲]

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See detailDNA binding activity of transcription factors in bronchial cells of horses with recurrent airway obstruction.
Couetil, Laurent L; Art, Tatiana ULg; De Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2006), 113(1-2), 11-20

Horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) present many similarities with human asthmatics including airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, reversible obstruction, and increased NF-kappaB ... [more ▼]

Horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) present many similarities with human asthmatics including airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, reversible obstruction, and increased NF-kappaB expression. Studies in experimental asthma models have shown that transcriptions factors such as activator protein-1 (AP-1), GATA-3, cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) may also play an important role in airway inflammation. The purpose of this study was to measure DNA binding activity of these transcription factors in the airways of horses with RAO and to compare it to pulmonary function and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cytology. Seven horses with RAO and six control animals were studied during a moldy hay challenge and after 2 months at pasture. Pulmonary function, BALF cytology and transcription factors' activities in bronchial brushings were measured during hay and pasture exposures. During moldy hay challenge, RAO-affected horses developed severe airway obstruction and inflammation and a significantly higher airway AP-1 binding activity than in controls. After 2 months on pasture, pulmonary function and airway AP-1 binding activity were not different between RAO and control horses. The DNA binding activity of CREB in airways of RAO-affected horses increased significantly after 2 months at pasture and became higher than in controls. A significant positive correlation was detected between AP-1 binding activity and indicators of airway obstruction and inflammation. Airway GATA-3, CEBP and CREB binding activities were negatively correlated with indices of airway obstruction. However, contrarily to CREB binding activity, GATA-3 and CEBP binding activities were not different between RAO and control horses and were unaffected by changes in environment. These data support the view that AP-1 and CREB play a role in modulating airway inflammation in horses with RAO [less ▲]

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See detailThe Effects of Dietary N-3 and Antioxidant Supplementation on Erythrocyte Membrane Fatty Acid Composition and Fluidity in Exercising Horses
Portier, Karine; de Moffarts, Brieuc; Fellman, Nicole et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (2006), 36

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Fatty acid supplementation could modulate erythrocyte membrane fluidity in horses at rest and during exercise, but information is lacking on the effect of exercise ... [more ▼]

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Fatty acid supplementation could modulate erythrocyte membrane fluidity in horses at rest and during exercise, but information is lacking on the effect of exercise. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of exercise with, and without, an oral antioxidant supplementation enriched with n-3 fatty acids on erythrocyte membrane fluidity (EMF) and fatty acid composition in eventing horses. METHODS: Twelve healthy and regularly trained horses were divided randomly into 2 groups: group S received an oral antioxidant cocktail enriched in n-3 fatty acid (alphatocopherol, eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) whereas group P was placebo-treated. At the end of 4 weeks, all horses performed a standardised exercise test (ET) under field conditions. Venous blood was sampled before starting treatment (TO), immediately before (T1) as well as 15 min (T2) and 24 h (T3) after ET. Spin labelled (16-DOXYL-stearic acid) red blood cell membranes were characterised using the relaxation correlation time (Tc in inverse proportion to EMF). Fatty acid composition (%) of the membrane was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. RESULTS: Supplementation did not induce changes in EMF (T1 vs. TO) but significant changes in membrane composition were observed and there were increases in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid PUFA, n-3/n-6 ratio, and total n-3 fatty acids. Exercise (T2 vs. T1) induced a significant decrease of EMF in group P (Tc: +19%, P<0.05) and nonsignificant decrease in group S (Tc: +5%), whereas membrane fatty acid composition did not change in either group. During the recovery period (T3 vs. T2), EMF decreased significantly in group S (Tc: +29%, P<0.05) and nonsignificantly in group P (Tc: +18%) without any significant changes in fatty acid composition. CONCLUSION AND POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: An enriched oral antioxidant supplementation induced changes in membrane composition, which modulated the decrease in EMF induced by exercise. Long chain n-3 fatty acid supplementation might therefore be beneficial. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of blood oxidant/antioxidant markers in healthy competition horses : effect of discipline and gender.
Kirschvink, N.; De Moffarts, Brieuc; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in 7th International Conference on Equine Exercise Physiology (2006)

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See detailImpact physiologique et pathologique du stress oxydant chez le cheval
De Moffarts, Brieuc; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Pincemail, Joël ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2005), 149(1), 1-9

Oxidative stress has become of increasing interest in research and in equine and human medicine. If the pro-oxidant burden overwhelms the endogenous antioxidant defence of the organism, the arising ... [more ▼]

Oxidative stress has become of increasing interest in research and in equine and human medicine. If the pro-oxidant burden overwhelms the endogenous antioxidant defence of the organism, the arising imbalance between pro- and antioxidants is defined as oxidative stress. Different pathways might increase the generation of reactive oxygen species ( ROS) and results in oxidative stress. In physiological conditions, like during moderated exercise, the balance between ROS production and antioxidants allows to maintain an optimal organic function. In the light of the potentially deleterious role of excessive ROS production and the evidence that exercise-induced oxidative stress occurs in horses, the assessment of the antioxidant status should be considered in sport horses. Recent researches indicate that oxidative stress may play a role in physiopathology of several pathological syndromes in horses. Therefore, with classical treatment, the controlled administration of antioxidants appears interesting for the modulation of these processes, as well as in sport horses during intense exercise period. [less ▲]

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See detailReference values for left ventricular echocardiographic parameters during atropine/dobutamine stress testing
Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg; De Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Proceedings of the 44th Annual Congress of the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) (2005)

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See detailStress oxydant et fluidité membranaire du globule rouge du cheval athlète : effets de l’exercice et de la complémentation en antioxydants
Portier, K.; de Moffarts, Brieuc; Lekeux, Pierre ULg et al

in 31ème Journée de la Recherche Equine des Haras Nationaux (2005)

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