References of "de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc"
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See detailThe susceptibility of bananas to crown rot disease is influenced by geographical and seasonal effects
Ewane, Cécile Annie; Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg et al

in Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology = Revue Canadienne de Phytopathologie (2013), 35(1), 27-36

Crown rot of banana fruits is caused by a complex of fungal pathogens, the most common of which is Colletotrichum musae, and is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Susceptibility of ... [more ▼]

Crown rot of banana fruits is caused by a complex of fungal pathogens, the most common of which is Colletotrichum musae, and is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Susceptibility of banana fruits to crown rot is influenced by many pre-harvest factors. The aim of this study was to improve on the methodology for the evaluation of fruit susceptibility and to verify whether cultivation areas in Cameroon as well as seasonal variations have an influence on the susceptibility to crown rot. Fruit susceptibility was evaluated on a monthly basis throughout a year (including the dry and rainy seasons) in three banana plantations located at very different agro-ecological conditions (two in a lowland area and one in a highland area). Fruit susceptibility was determined through an internal necrotic surface (INS) assessment after artificial inoculation with C. musae. The standardization of post-inoculation environmental conditions enabled more reliable INS assessments. Fruit susceptibility was found to be significantly influenced by cultivation area (P<0.001) since fruits grown in low altitude (Dia-dia, Koumba, 80 m) were more susceptible than fruits grown in high altitude (Ekona, 500 m). Although no seasonal effect was observed (P=0.075), there was a highly significant date effect (P<0.001). This was specifically the case in low altitude plantations where fruit susceptibility was higher for some harvest dates within the rainy season. In Ekona, fruit grade and number of leaves on the banana plant were found to be significantly higher than in the two other locations, while black leaf streak disease severity was significantly lower. The potential relationship with fruit susceptibility is fully discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe susceptibility of bananas to crown rot disease is influenced by geographical and seasonal effects
Ewane, Cécile Annie; Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg et al

in Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology = Revue Canadienne de Phytopathologie (2013), 35(1), 27-36

Crown rot of banana fruits is caused by a complex of fungal pathogens, the most common of which is Colletotrichum musae, and is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Susceptibility of ... [more ▼]

Crown rot of banana fruits is caused by a complex of fungal pathogens, the most common of which is Colletotrichum musae, and is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Susceptibility of banana fruits to crown rot is influenced by many pre-harvest factors. The aim of this study was to improve on the methodology for the evaluation of fruit susceptibility and to verify whether cultivation areas in Cameroon as well as seasonal variations have an influence on the susceptibility to crown rot. Fruit susceptibility was evaluated on a monthly basis throughout a year (including the dry and rainy seasons) in three banana plantations located at very different agro-ecological conditions (two in a lowland area and one in a highland area). Fruit susceptibility was determined through an internal necrotic surface (INS) assessment after artificial inoculation with C. musae. The standardization of post-inoculation environmental conditions enabled more reliable INS assessments. Fruit susceptibility was found to be significantly influenced by cultivation area (P<0.001) since fruits grown in low altitude (Dia-dia, Koumba, 80 m) were more susceptible than fruits grown in high altitude (Ekona, 500 m). Although no seasonal effect was observed (P=0.075), there was a highly significant date effect (P<0.001). This was specifically the case in low altitude plantations where fruit susceptibility was higher for some harvest dates within the rainy season. In Ekona, fruit grade and number of leaves on the banana plant were found to be significantly higher than in the two other locations, while black leaf streak disease severity was significantly lower. The potential relationship with fruit susceptibility is fully discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of the extension of black leaf streak disease on banana susceptibility to post-harvest diseases
Ewané, Cécile Annie; Chillet, Marc; Castelan, Florence et al

in Fruits (2013), 68(5), 351-365

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See detailInvolvement of phenolic compounds in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot. A review.
Ewane, Cécile Annie; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2012), 16(3), 393-404

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See detailPre-harvest conditions affect the banana susceptibility to post-hervest disease.
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Ewane, Cecile; Forret, Marie et al

Conference (2011, May 24)

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See detailCatecholamine biosynthesis pathway potentially involved in banana defense mechanisms to crown rot disease
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Frettinger, Patrick et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2011), 76(4), 591-601

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See detailIdentification of genes involved in the response of banana to crown rot disease
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Frettinger, Patrick; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc et al

in Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions [=MPMI] (2011), 24(1), 143-153

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See detailCrown rot of banana: Preharvest factors involved in postharvest disease development and integrated control methods
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Jijakli, Haissam ULg; Chillet, M. et al

in Plant Disease (2010), 94(6), 648-658

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See detailHand position on the bunch and source-sink ratio influence the banana fruit susceptibility to crown rot disease
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Bastiaanse, H.; Chillet, M. et al

in Annals of Applied Biology (2010), 156

The postharvest development of crown rot of bananas depends notably on the fruit susceptibility to this disease at harvest. It has been shown that fruit susceptibility to crown rot is variable and it was ... [more ▼]

The postharvest development of crown rot of bananas depends notably on the fruit susceptibility to this disease at harvest. It has been shown that fruit susceptibility to crown rot is variable and it was suggested that this depends on environmental preharvest factors. However, little is known about the preharvest factors influencing this susceptibility. The aim of this work was to evaluate the extent to which fruit filling characteristics during growth and the fruit development stage influence the banana susceptibility to crown rot. This involved evaluating the influence of (a) the fruit position at different levels of the banana bunch (hands) and (b) changing the source–sink ratio (So–Si ratio), on the fruit susceptibility to crown rot. The fruit susceptibility was determined by measuring the internal necrotic surface (INS) after artificial inoculation of Colletotrichum musae. A linear correlation (r = −0.95) was found between the hand position on the bunch and the INS. The So–Si ratio was found to influence the pomological characteristics of the fruits and their susceptibility to crown rot. Fruits of bunches from which six hands were removed (two hands remaining on the bunch) proved to be significantly less susceptible to crown rot (INS = 138.3 mm2) than those from bunches with eight hands (INS = 237.9 mm2). The banana susceptibility to crown rot is thus likely to be influenced by the fruit development stage and filling characteristics. The present results highlight the importance of standardising hand sampling on a bunch when testing fruit susceptibility to crown rot. They also show that hand removal in the field has advantages in the context of integrated pest management, making it possible to reduce fruit susceptibility to crown rot while increasing fruit size. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrated control of crown rot of banana with Candida oleophila strain O, calcium chloride and modified atmosphere packaging
Bastiaanse, H.; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Lassois, Ludivine ULg et al

in Biological Control (2010), 53

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See detailCombining an original method for preserving RNA expression in situ with an effetive RNA method makes it possible to study gene expression in any banana fruit tissue.
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

in Fruits (2009), 64(3), 127-137

Introduction. RNA isolation is a prerequisite to studying gene expression in banana and to understanding changes occurring in response to the environment. Standard extraction methods do not efficiently ... [more ▼]

Introduction. RNA isolation is a prerequisite to studying gene expression in banana and to understanding changes occurring in response to the environment. Standard extraction methods do not efficiently extract RNA from plants such as banana, with high levels of phenolics, carbohydrates, or other compounds that bind to and/or coprecipitate with RNA. Materials and methods. Five to seven RNA extraction methods were compared. Four crowntissue storage methods were also compared. cDNA-AFLP was used to ensure that the obtained RNA was of sufficient quality for molecular applications and that RNA expression was unaltered by in situ storage. Results and discussion. The modified hot-borate method proved to be the best RNA extraction method, allowing high yields of good quality, undegraded RNA from the crown, fruit peel and pulp at all stages of ripening. The RNA obtained by this method was of sufficient quality for molecular applications such as cDNA-AFLP that give highly reproducible results. Freeze-drying of fresh tissues and tissue conservation in hot-borate buffer, two original storage methods, appear appropriate for preserving RNA in situ without ultra-low temperature. The RNA obtained was of high quality, undegraded, and useful for all downstream applications. The genome expression profile obtained by cDNA-AFLP analysis was unaltered by these methods for storing collected tissues. Conclusion. By applying all the suggested procedures in this work, it is possible to store and study gene expression in any banana fruit tissue, whatever the maturity stage, without affecting the RNA expression level. [less ▲]

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See detailThe post-harvest quality of bananas is determined by pre-harvest factors
de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Chillet, Marc; Lassois, Ludivine ULg et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailUse of cDNA-AFLP to study the defence-related gene expression in bananas (Musa spp.), inoculated with Colletotrichum musae responsible of crown rot
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

Conference (2009)

Crown rot disease of bananas is widespread in producing countries and is considered as the most important post-harvest disease of exported bananas. Variations of susceptibility to the disease have been ... [more ▼]

Crown rot disease of bananas is widespread in producing countries and is considered as the most important post-harvest disease of exported bananas. Variations of susceptibility to the disease have been noted between bananas but the origins still unknown. The biological responses of the fruit, including physiological change and disease susceptibility are controlled and regulated by gene expression. One way to understanding the reactions involved in variation of banana susceptibility to the disease in relation to their physiological state, is to study the expression of genes involved in these processes. To this purpose, crown sample previously inoculated with C. musae and showing 2 levels of susceptibility (very high and very low) were collected to be compared. Crown sample of each susceptibility level was collected at two different maturity stages: at harvest and 13 days after harvest (3 days after ripening). Collected crowns were immediately freeze-dried, an original method to conserve gene expression. cDNA-AFLP was applied on these 4 cell populations in order to highlight the differential transcription of genes whose function is "a priori" unknown. The cDNA-AFLP result was confirmed using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. Various defence-related genes were identified and will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailBiological Control of Crown Rot of Bananas With Pichia Anomala Strain K And Candida Oleophila Strain O
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; De lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

in Biological Control (2008), 45(3), 410-418

The antagonistic activity of two yeast strains (Pichia anomala (E.C. Hansen) Kurtzman, strain K and Candida oleophila Montrocher, strain O) against the parasitic complex responsible for banana crown rot ... [more ▼]

The antagonistic activity of two yeast strains (Pichia anomala (E.C. Hansen) Kurtzman, strain K and Candida oleophila Montrocher, strain O) against the parasitic complex responsible for banana crown rot was evaluated. The strains were applied at three different concentrations (106, 107 , 108 cfu/ml) and their efficacy tested in vivo on three separate fungi (Colletotrichum musae (Berk. & Curt.) Arx, Fusarium moniliforme Sheldon, and Cephalosporium sp.) and on a parasitic complex formed by association of these three fungi. At the concentrations used C. musae appeared to be the most pathogenic. The complex showed intermediate aggressiveness between C. musae and both other fungi. Statistically significant antagonistic effects were observed on C. musae, F. moniliforme, and the fungal complex. The highest protection level (54.4%) was observed with strain O added at 108 cfu/ml on crowns previously inoculated with the fungal complex. The level was lower when the fungi were inoculated separately. Furthermore, the antagonistic effect was strongly reinforced when strain O at 108 cfu/ml was applied 24 h before fungal complex inoculation (59.9%), as compared to its application 15 min (24.3%) or 3 h (27.3%) after fungal complex inoculation. Bananas showed increased susceptibility to the fungal complex from March to June, and this influenced the level of protection by yeast, which decreased over the same period. A strict negative correlation (R2 = 0.83) was highlighted between susceptibility of banana to crown rot and protection provided by yeast. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrated biological control of crown rot of bananas with Candida oleophila strain O, calcium chloride and modified atmosphere
de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Bastiaanse, Héloïse ULg et al

in Borja; Nogales; Orrantia (Eds.) et al Memories of 18th Reuniao international ACORBAT meeting (2008)

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See detailContribution to the development of a biological control method against crown rot banana disease
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Jijakli, Haissam ULg et al

Poster (2004)

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