References of "Zwintz, K"
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See detailTwo spotted and magnetic early B-type stars in the young open cluster NGC2264 discovered by MOST and ESPaDOnS
Fossati, L.; Zwintz, K.; Castro, N. et al

in ArXiv e-prints (2014), 1401

Star clusters are known as superb tools for understanding stellar evolution. In a quest for understanding the physical origin of magnetism and chemical peculiarity in about 7% of the massive main-sequence ... [more ▼]

Star clusters are known as superb tools for understanding stellar evolution. In a quest for understanding the physical origin of magnetism and chemical peculiarity in about 7% of the massive main-sequence stars, we analysed two of the ten brightest members of the ~10 Myr old Galactic open cluster NGC 2264, the early B-dwarfs HD47887 and HD47777. We find accurate rotation periods of 1.95 and 2.64 days, respectively, from MOST photometry. We obtained ESPaDOnS spectropolarimetric observations, through which we determined stellar parameters, detailed chemical surface abundances, projected rotational velocities, and the inclination angles of the rotation axis. Because we found only small (<5 km/s) radial velocity variations, most likely caused by spots, we can rule out that HD47887 and HD47777 are close binaries. Finally, using the least-squares deconvolution technique, we found that both stars possess a large-scale magnetic field with an average longitudinal field strength of about 400 G. From a simultaneous fit of the stellar parameters we determine the evolutionary masses of HD47887 and HD47777 to be 9.4+/-0.7 M0 and 7.6+/-0.5 M0. Interestingly, HD47777 shows a remarkable helium underabundance, typical of helium-weak chemically peculiar stars, while the abundances of HD47887 are normal, which might imply that diffusion is operating in the lower mass star but not in the slightly more massive one. Furthermore, we argue that the rather slow rotation, as well as the lack of nitrogen enrichment in both stars, can be consistent with both the fossil and the binary hypothesis for the origin of the magnetic field. However, the presence of two magnetic and apparently single stars near the top of the cluster mass-function may speak in favour of the latter. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst asteroseismic results from CoRoT
Michel, Eric; Baglin, A.; Weiss, W. W. et al

in Communications in Asteroseismology (2008), 156

About one year after the end of the first observational run and six months after the first CoRoT data delivery, we comment the data exploitation progress for different types of stars. We consider first ... [more ▼]

About one year after the end of the first observational run and six months after the first CoRoT data delivery, we comment the data exploitation progress for different types of stars. We consider first results to illustrate how these data of unprecedented quality shed a new light on the field of stellar seismology. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Seismology Programme of CoRoT
Michel, Eric; Baglin, A.; Auvergne, M. et al

in Proceedings of "The CoRoT Mission Pre-Launch Status - Stellar Seismology and Planet Finding (2006, November 01)

We introduce the main lines and specificities of the CoRoT Seismology Core Programme. The development and consolidation of this programme has been made in the framework of the CoRoT Seismology Working ... [more ▼]

We introduce the main lines and specificities of the CoRoT Seismology Core Programme. The development and consolidation of this programme has been made in the framework of the CoRoT Seismology Working Group. With a few illustrative examples, we show how CoRoT data will help to address various problems associated with present open questions of stellar structure and evolution. [less ▲]

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See detailAdditional science potential for COROT
Weiss, W. W.; Aerts, C.; Aigrain, S. et al

in Favata, F.; Aigrain, S.; Wilson, A. (Eds.) Stellar Structure and Habitable Planet Finding (2004, January 01)

Space experiments which are aiming towards asteroseismology and the detection of exoplanets, like COROT or MOST, Eddington and Kepler, are designed to deliver high precision photometric data. Obviously ... [more ▼]

Space experiments which are aiming towards asteroseismology and the detection of exoplanets, like COROT or MOST, Eddington and Kepler, are designed to deliver high precision photometric data. Obviously, they can be used also for other purposes than the primary science goals and in addition many other targets can or will be automatically observed simultaneously with the primary targets. As a consequence, fascinating possibilities for additional (parallel, secondary) science projects emerge. For COROT a dedicated working group was thus established with the goal to contribute any useful information which may optimize the scientific output of the mission. [less ▲]

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