References of "Zicola, Angélique"
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See detailFeline herpesvirus 1 and feline calicivirus infections in a heterogeneous cat population of a rescue shelter.
Zicola, Angélique ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Quatpers, Dominique et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11(12), 1023-7

Feline herpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV), associated with upper respiratory tract disease, are highly prevalent in cats worldwide. With the aim to investigate the importance of feline ... [more ▼]

Feline herpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV), associated with upper respiratory tract disease, are highly prevalent in cats worldwide. With the aim to investigate the importance of feline respiratory viruses in a heterogeneous population of cats, samples were taken in a rescue shelter in Liege, Belgium, between March 2005 and August 2006. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed to diagnose FCV and FeHV-1 infection in the sampled cats. The prevalence rate (33.1%) was higher for FCV than for FeHV-1 (20.1%) whereas prevalence rate of co-infection with both viruses was 10%. Gingivitis was more common in FCV infections (odds ratio (OR)=2.83) whereas respiratory signs were more often observed with FeHV-1 infections. The average age was significantly higher in FCV positive cats (38 months) than in FeHV-1 positive cats (29.9 months). The second and the fourth quarters of the year and the two first quarters were significantly more at risk than the others in the case of FeHV-1 and FCV infection, respectively. Age was found to be a confounding factor. High prevalence of both infections strengthens the importance of applying hygienic and preventive measures in rescue shelters where cats with an unknown status of vaccination are introduced. [less ▲]

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See detailLes mécanismes et les conséquences sur l'organisme des infections virales chez les équidés
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg; Mathijs, Elisabeth ULg et al

in Nouveau Praticien Vétérinaire Equine (2008), 5

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See detailMolecular epidemiology of canine parvovirus, Europe
Decaro, Nicolas; Desario, Costantino; Addie, Diane D. et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2007), 13(8), 1222-1224

Canine parvovirus (CPV), which causes hemorrhagic enteritis in dogs, has 3 antigenic variants: types 2a, 2b, and 2c. Molecular method assessment of the distribution of the CPV variants in Europe showed ... [more ▼]

Canine parvovirus (CPV), which causes hemorrhagic enteritis in dogs, has 3 antigenic variants: types 2a, 2b, and 2c. Molecular method assessment of the distribution of the CPV variants in Europe showed that the new variant CPV-2c is widespread in Europe and that the viruses are distributed in different countries. [less ▲]

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See detailHighly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus in cats and other carnivores
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Zicola, Angélique ULg; Addie, D. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2007), 122(1-2), 25-31

The Asian lineage highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus is a known pathogen of birds. Only recently, the virus has been reported to cause sporadic fatal disease in carnivores, and its ... [more ▼]

The Asian lineage highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus is a known pathogen of birds. Only recently, the virus has been reported to cause sporadic fatal disease in carnivores, and its zoonotic potential has been dominating the popular media. Attention to felids was drawn by two outbreaks with high mortality in tigers, leopards and other exotic felids in Thailand. Subsequently, domestic cats were found naturally infected and experimentally susceptible to H5N1 virus. A high susceptibility of the dog to H3N8 equine influenza A virus had been reported earlier, and recently also HPAI H5N1 virus has been identified as a canine pathogen. The ferret, hamster and mouse are suitable as experimental animals; importantly, these species are also kept as pets. Experimental intratracheal and oral infection of cats with an HPAI H5N1 virus isolate from a human case resulted in lethal disease; furthermore, cats have been infected by the feeding of infected chickens. Spread of the infection from experimentally infected to in-contact cats has been reported. The epidemiological role of the cat and other pet animal species in transmitting HPAI H5N1 virus to humans needs continuous consideration and attention. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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