References of "Zalfen, Alina"
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See detailControlled release of drugs from multi-component biomaterials
Zalfen, Alina ULg; Nizet, D.; Jérôme, Christine ULg et al

in Acta Biomaterialia (2008), 4(6), 1788-1796

In order to control their release, drugs are encapsulated into systems which are expected to provide a certain site with a predetermined amount of drug over a well-defined period of time. Here we report ... [more ▼]

In order to control their release, drugs are encapsulated into systems which are expected to provide a certain site with a predetermined amount of drug over a well-defined period of time. Here we report on a multi-component drug delivery biomaterial that consists of a hydrogel matrix in which drug-loaded biodegradable microcarriers are dispersed, and whose potential applications could be found in the design of implantable devices with long-term activity, as required by contraceptive and hormone replacement treatments. The release profile of the drug can actually be tuned by the complex interplay of several release mechanisms, including the permeability and eventually the degradation rate of the microcarriers and the diffusion through the hydrogel. The hydrogel consisted of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate cross-linked by ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The microcarriers were biodegradable poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) microspheres in which active molecules, such as levonorgestrel (LNG), were encapsulated. The hydrogels were characterized by water swelling, thermal properties, LNG diffusion through drug-free and drug-depleted hydrogel membranes and LNG release from devices with drug dispersed in the hydrogel. The PCL microspheres were observed by scanning electron microscopy; their size distribution, LNG loading and release were also investigated. The hydrogel-microsphere assemblies were characterized in terms of the distribution of the microspheres within the hydrogel, water swelling and the release of the encapsulated molecules. The developed device, due to its composite structure, has the ability to combine several release mechanisms, leading to drug release obeying zero-order kinetics for most of the time. [less ▲]

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