References of "Youssao, A. K. I"
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See detailSpatial distribution and risks factors of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin based meat inspection records
Goussanou, S. E.; Kpodekon, T. M.; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in International Research Journal of Microbiology (2013), 4(8), 188-196

Porcine cysticercosis, which is widely distributed in Africa, causes financial losses and diseases among humans. To control the disease in an area, it is important to know the geographical distribution ... [more ▼]

Porcine cysticercosis, which is widely distributed in Africa, causes financial losses and diseases among humans. To control the disease in an area, it is important to know the geographical distribution. In this study, spatial distribution of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin was performed. By using the number of partial organ seizures at meat inspection, the study has revealed high risks of porcine cysticercosis in administrative districts of Aplahoue, Dogbo, Klouekanme and Lokossa. The proportion of seizures ranged from 0.06% for neck muscles to 0.69% for tongues. Spatial analysis of carcass seizure frequencies revealed Akpro Misserete, Avrankou, Dangbo, Porto-Novo, Ifangni and Aguegues as the most likely clusters (P<0.001) for porcine cysticercosis distribution. The risk factor found to be associated with the porcine distribution was the Taenia solium cysticerci positive testing using lingual examination by butchers and retailers. Catching of pig within the Zou and Mono department and pigs directly purchased by the butcher were found protective factors for distribution of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin. [less ▲]

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See detailNutrient digestibility of Mucuna (Mucuna pruriens var. utilis) bean in guinea fowl (Numida meleagris, L): Effects of heat treatment and levels of incorporation in diets.
Dahouda, M.; Toleba, S. S.; Youssao, A. K. I. et al

in British Poultry Science (2009), 50(5), 564-72

1. Mucuna pruriens var. utilis is a legume, the seeds of which are scarcely used in animal diets owing to their high content of 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-Dopa). 2. Experiments were conducted on ... [more ▼]

1. Mucuna pruriens var. utilis is a legume, the seeds of which are scarcely used in animal diets owing to their high content of 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-Dopa). 2. Experiments were conducted on guinea fowl to assess the effects of two types of heat processing (cooking and toasting) on chemical composition and nutrient digestibility of Mucuna seeds offered alone or incorporated at three concentrations (40, 120 or 200 g/kg) in complete diets. 3. Diets containing 200 g/kg seeds had more crude fibre and less ether extract. L-Dopa content increased with the amount of Mucuna inclusion. Cooking reduced markedly L-Dopa content while toasting had no effect. When fed alone, Mucuna seeds dramatically decreased feed intake. 4. Feed intake (FI) and body weight gain (BWG) were not influenced by the complete diets. Cooking significantly increased crude fibre digestibility. 5. It is suggested that cracked and cooked Mucuna bean can be incorporated at a safe level of 120 g/kg in complete diets for guinea fowl production. [less ▲]

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See detailFood resources unconventional use for poultry production in Africa: nutritional values and constraints
Dahouda, M.; Toleba, S. S.; Senou, M. et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2009), 153(1), 5-21

Numerous works are related to the use of unconventional feed resources, and particularly to Mucuna Spp., in poultry diet. This review aims at describing the context of their use, their nutritional values ... [more ▼]

Numerous works are related to the use of unconventional feed resources, and particularly to Mucuna Spp., in poultry diet. This review aims at describing the context of their use, their nutritional values and the constraints related to their upgrading, before considering the effects of the various methods of treatment on the reduction of the toxic substances that they could contain and on their chemical compositions. The methods of treatment are very variable and their standardisation should allow using them in rural area. Those feed could thus constitute an alternative to costly conventional feed usually used in poultry production. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of chips and cassava leaves in finishing guinea (Numida meleagris, L): animal performance, costs of production, Aspect of the carcass and meat quality
Dahouda, M.; Toleba, S. S.; Youssao, A. K. I. et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2009), 153(2), 82-87

The effect of feed containing cassava leafs and peels was assessed on 126 local guinea fowls animal performance, production costs and meat quality over a period of 28 weeks in humid tropical climate of ... [more ▼]

The effect of feed containing cassava leafs and peels was assessed on 126 local guinea fowls animal performance, production costs and meat quality over a period of 28 weeks in humid tropical climate of the South Benin. After 12 weeks of classical feeding, animals were randomly allotted in three groups of 42 for the finishing period: the group 1 received a control diet while, in group 2, 8% and 35 % of cassava leafs and cossets were respectively incorporated, vs. 6 % and 25 % in group 3. At the end of the trial, eighteen guinea fowls per group were slaughtered in order to determine characteristics of the carcass and meat quality. Individual daily feed intake was higher in the control group than in the groups 2 and 3. Animals from control group shown higher growth rate (5.0 g/d) (P<0.05) than in groups 2 and 3. Consequently, feed conversion ratios were similar in the three groups with values of 7.5, 6.7 and 6.9, in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. At the end of the trial, animals in control group were heavier than those in groups 2 and 3 (P<0.05). No negative influence of cassava cossets and leaf meals was observed on carcass quality in the experimental diets. Feed costs per kg live weight were reduced by 24.6 and 21.0% in groups 2 and 3, respectively, when compared to control group. Guinea fowl production appears thus more profitable with feed containing cassava leaves and cossets. Consequently, these ingredients could be alternative sources of energy and protein, with emphasis during the finishing period. [less ▲]

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See detailLes ressources alimentaires non-conventionnelles utilisables pour la production aviaire en Afrique : valeurs nutritionnelles et contraintes
Dahouda, M.; Toléba, S. S.; Sénou, M. et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2009), 153

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See detailThe effects of raw and processed Mucuna priurens seed based diets on the growth parameters and meat characteristics of Benin local Guinea fowl (Meleagris numida, L)
Dahouda, M.; Toleba, S. S.; Youssao, A. K. I. et al

in International Journal of Poultry Sciences (2009), 8(9), 882-889

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See detailSeasonal variations in the crop contents of scavenging Helmeted Guinea Fowls (Numida meleagris, L.) in Parakou (Benin).
Dahouda, M.; Toléba, Seibou Soumanou; Youssao, A. K. I. et al

in British Poultry Science (2008), 49(6), 751-9

1. An experiment was carried out with 120 helmeted guinea fowls during one year in Parakou (Benin). Feed intake, ingredient and chemical composition, along with the nutritional adequacy of scavenging ... [more ▼]

1. An experiment was carried out with 120 helmeted guinea fowls during one year in Parakou (Benin). Feed intake, ingredient and chemical composition, along with the nutritional adequacy of scavenging diets were measured during the rainy season (November-February) and dry season (March-October) in order to propose supplementation strategies. Ingredients found in crops were identified and allocated into 6 main categories (supplemental feed, seeds, green forages, animal materials, mineral matter and unidentified materials). 2. Mean dry weights of crop contents were significantly higher in the rainy than in the dry season. Amounts and proportions of supplemental feed and seeds were not significantly different between seasons, whereas those of green forage, animal materials and mineral matter were higher in rainy season. Supplemental feed, especially maize and sorghum, was the largest component of the crop content in both seasons. The most represented grass seeds were Panicum maximum (rainy season) and Rottboellia cochinchinensis (dry season). 3. Dietary concentrations of organic matter, non-nitrogen extract and metabolisable energy were higher in the dry season, while mineral concentrations were higher in the rainy season. There were no significant differences between the two seasons in dry matter, crude protein or crude fibre. 4. Scavenging provided insufficient nutrients and energy to allow guinea fowls to be productive. Therefore, more nutritionally balanced supplementary feed would be required during both seasons. [less ▲]

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See detailExamination of non-genetic factors affecting the growth performance of Djallonke sheep in soudanian zone at the Okpara Breeding farm of Benin
Gbangboche, A. B.; Youssao, A. K. I.; Adamou-Ndiaye, M. et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2006), 38

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See detailNon-genetic factors affecting the reproduction performance, lamb growth and productivity indices of Djallonke sheep
Gbangboche, A. B.; Adamou-Ndiaye, M.; Youssao, A. K. I. et al

in Small Ruminant Research (2006), 64((1-2)), 133-142

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See detailEvaluation par ultrasonographie en temps réel de la teneur en gras intramusculaire du porc Piétrain
Youssao, A. K. I.; Verleyen, Vincent ULg; Michaux, Charles ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2002), 146(4), 249-255

Real-time ultrasound data collection, consisting specifically of longissimus thoracis muscle echogenicity, was carried out on 80 Pietrain pigs (42 gilts and 34 barrows) using the Pie Medical scanner 200 ... [more ▼]

Real-time ultrasound data collection, consisting specifically of longissimus thoracis muscle echogenicity, was carried out on 80 Pietrain pigs (42 gilts and 34 barrows) using the Pie Medical scanner 200 equipped with an ASP-18 probe and 3.5 MHz to predict intramuscular fat. Two ribs thickness (12th and 13th ribs) was excised from the longissimus thoracis muscle for subsequent ether extract value (EE) determination. The percentage of white pixels in the ultrasound image were related to EE percentage. The EE percentages were 1.44, 1.37 and 1.15 % respectively for the homozygous stress-negative Pietrain (CC), heterozygous stress-negative Pietrain (CT) and homozygous stress-positive Pietrain (TT) individuals. The percentage of white pixels in the longissimus thoracis images were 9.98, 8.75 and 7.79 % respectively for CC, CT and TT genotypes. The barrows had an higher intramuscular fat and white pixel percentage than the gilts. The determination coefficient (R 2) of the EE prediction model originating from the white pixels percentage was 0.35 with a root mean squared error of 0.26 %. These performance could be potentially improved using the calibration phantom of the ASP-18 probe, before taking images. [less ▲]

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