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See detailMultimodality imaging assessment of the deleterious role of the intraluminal thrombus on the growth of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a rat model
NCHIMI LONGANG, Alain ULg; Courtois, Audrey ULg; EL HACHEMI, Mounia ULg et al

in European Radiology (2015), online

Objectives To evaluate imaging changes occurring in a rat model of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), with emphasis on the intraluminal thrombus (ILT) occurrence. Methods The post-induction ... [more ▼]

Objectives To evaluate imaging changes occurring in a rat model of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), with emphasis on the intraluminal thrombus (ILT) occurrence. Methods The post-induction growth of the AAA diameter was characterized using ultrasound in 22 rats. ILT was reported on 13 rats that underwent 14 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 2-18 days post-surgery, and on 10 rats that underwent 18 fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/microcomputed tomography examinations 2-27 days post-surgery. Logistic regressions were used to establish the evolution with time of AAA length, diameter, ILT thickness, volume, stratification, MRI and FDG PET signalling properties, and histological assessment of inflammatory infiltrates. Results All of the following significantly increased with time post-induction (p < 0.001): AAA length, AAA diameter, ILT maximal thickness, ILT volume, ILT iron content and related MRI signalling changes, quantitative uptake on FDG PET, and the magnitude of inflammatory infiltrates on histology. However, the aneurysm growth peak followed occurrence of ILT approximately 6 days after elastase infusion. Conclusion Our model emphasizes that occurrence of ILT precedes AAA peak growth. Aneurysm growth is associated with increasing levels of iron, signalling properties changes in both MRI and FDG PET, relating to its biological activities. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging myeloma and related monoclonal plasma cell disorders using MRI, low dose whole-body CT and FDG PET/CT
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; NANNI, C.; SIMONI, Paolo ULg et al

in Clinical and Translational Imaging (2015)

A majority of multiple myeloma patients present with osteolytic bone lesions that can cause bone pain, fractures or hypercalcaemia. Correct identification of these lesions is important in the initial ... [more ▼]

A majority of multiple myeloma patients present with osteolytic bone lesions that can cause bone pain, fractures or hypercalcaemia. Correct identification of these lesions is important in the initial assessment of the disease. <br />Although the radiological skeletal survey is the gold standard to detect bone osteolytic lesions, it may miss small bone lesions or lesions located in the spine or pelvis due to the superimposed images of soft tissues. These limitations propelled newer imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma. In addition, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and MRI have prognostic value and can be used to monitor disease. <br />This review discusses the additional value of PET/CT and MRI in the management of MM. [less ▲]

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See detail18F-FPRGD2 PET/CT imaging of integrin αvβ3 in renal carcinomas: Correlation with histopathology
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; SIGNOLLE, NICOLAS; SOMJA, Joan ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2015)

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See detail(18)F-FPRGD2 PET/CT imaging of musculoskeletal disorders.
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; CHARLIER, Edith ULg; Simoni, Paolo et al

in Annals of nuclear medicine (2015), 29(10), 839-47

OBJECTIVE: This work reports on musculoskeletal uptake of (18)F-FPRGD2, targeting the integrin alphavbeta3, in patients who had undergone (18)F-FPRGD2 positron emission tomography combined with computed ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: This work reports on musculoskeletal uptake of (18)F-FPRGD2, targeting the integrin alphavbeta3, in patients who had undergone (18)F-FPRGD2 positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) for oncologic purposes. METHODS: Whole-body (18)F-FPRGD2 PET/CT images of 62 cancer patients were retrospectively reviewed to detect foci of musculoskeletal (18)F-FPRGD2 uptake. For 37 patients, a FDG PET/CT performed in clinical settings was available. In each joint with an abnormal uptake, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was estimated. RESULTS: A total of 260 musculoskeletal foci of (18)F-FPRGD2 uptake were detected. Most common sites of uptake were joints and discs (n = 160; 61.5 %), entheses (osteotendinous and osteoligamentous junctions; n = 55; 21.2 %) and recent fractures (n = 18; 6.9 %). In addition, 27 (10.4 %) miscellaneous foci were detected. Out of the 146 lesions for which a FDG PET was available, 63 % showed both (18)F-FPRGD2 and FDG uptake, 33.6 % did not show FDG avidity and 3.4 % showed only FDG uptake. The uptake intensity of the 92 lesions positive with (18)F-FPRGD2 and FDG was similar with both radiopharmaceuticals, but the target-to-background (blood pool or muscle) ratios were significantly higher with (18)F-FPRGD2 than with FDG (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: The (18)F-FPRGD2 uptake in joints, spine degenerative diseases and tendons was highly prevalent in our population. Up to one-third of (18)F-FPRGD2 foci showed no FDG uptake suggesting that (18)F-FPRGD2 signal may not be related to inflammatory angiogenesis only. [less ▲]

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See detail[F]FPRGD PET/CT imaging of integrin alphabeta levels in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma.
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; Martinive, Philippe ULg; VANDERICK, Jean ULg et al

in European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging (2015)

PURPOSE: Our primary objective was to determine if [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT performed at baseline and/or after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) could predict tumour regression grade (TRG) in locally advanced rectal ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: Our primary objective was to determine if [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT performed at baseline and/or after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) could predict tumour regression grade (TRG) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Secondary objectives were to compare baseline [18F]FPRGD2 and [18F]FDG uptake, to evaluate the correlation between posttreatment [18F]FPRGD2 uptake and tumour microvessel density (MVD) and to determine if [18F]FPRGD2 and FDG PET/CT could predict disease-free survival. METHODS: Baseline [18F]FPRGD2 and FDG PET/CT were performed in 32 consecutive patients (23 men, 9 women; mean age 63 +/- 8 years) with LARC before starting any therapy. A posttreatment [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT scan was performed in 24 patients after the end of CRT (median interval 7 weeks, range 3 - 15 weeks) and before surgery (median interval 4 days, range 1 - 15 days). RESULTS: All LARC showed uptake of both [18F]FPRGD2 (SUVmax 5.4 +/- 1.5, range 2.7 - 9) and FDG (SUVmax 16.5 +/- 8, range 7.1 - 36.5). There was a moderate positive correlation between [18F]FPRGD2 and FDG SUVmax (Pearson's r = 0.49, p = 0.0026). There was a moderate negative correlation between baseline [18F]FPRGD2 SUVmax and the TRG (Spearman's r = -0.37, p = 0.037), and a [18F]FPRGD2 SUVmax of >5.6 identified all patients with a complete response (TRG 0; AUC 0.84, 95 % CI 0.68 - 1, p = 0.029). In the 24 patients who underwent a posttreatment [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT scan the response index, calculated as [(SUVmax1 - SUVmax2)/SUVmax1] x 100 %, was not associated with TRG. Post-treatment [18F]FPRGD2 uptake was not correlated with tumour MVD. Neither [18F]FPRGD2 nor FDG uptake predicted disease-free survival. CONCLUSION: Baseline [18F]FPRGD2 uptake was correlated with the pathological response in patients with LARC treated with CRT. However, the specificity was too low to consider its clinical routine use. [less ▲]

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See detailLe cas clinique du mois : Pseudo-démence dépressive
SCHENA, Anthony; Ansseau, Marc ULg; TRIFFAUX, Jean-Marc ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69

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See detailThe role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis and follow up of multiple myeloma.
CAERS, Jo ULg; WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; Hillengass et al

in Haematologica (2014), 99(4), 629-37

Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy and occurs most commonly in elderly patients. Almost all multiple myeloma patients develop bone lesions in the course of their disease or ... [more ▼]

Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy and occurs most commonly in elderly patients. Almost all multiple myeloma patients develop bone lesions in the course of their disease or have evidence of bone loss at initial diagnosis. Whole-body conventional radiography remains the gold standard in the diagnostic evaluation, but computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography are increasingly used as complementary techniques in the detection of bone lesions. Moreover, the number of lesions detected and the presence of extramedullary disease give strong prognostic information. These new techniques may help to assess treatment response in solitary plasmacytoma or in multiple myeloma. In this article, we review recent data on the different imaging techniques used at diagnosis and in the assessment of treatment response, and discuss some current issues. [less ▲]

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See detailUtilisation de l'imagerie fonctionnelle en radiothérapie
LALLEMAND, François ULg; LAKOSI, Ferenc ULg; HUSTINX, Roland ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(Supp 1), 20-28

Les progrès technologiques réalisés par l’image- rie médicale l’ont placée au centre de la prise en charge des patients oncologiques, tant au niveau du diagnostic, du pro - nostic et du suivi que dans la ... [more ▼]

Les progrès technologiques réalisés par l’image- rie médicale l’ont placée au centre de la prise en charge des patients oncologiques, tant au niveau du diagnostic, du pro - nostic et du suivi que dans la prise en charge thérapeutique. En effet, l’imagerie représente, à l’heure actuelle, la pierre angulaire des traitements de radiothérapie. Les objectifs du radiothérapeute sont d’irradier le plus précisément possible la tumeur à dose curative, tout en évitant les organes sains. Pour y arriver, le radiothérapeute utilise de façon routinière l’imagerie anatomique (Scanner et IRM). Depuis quelques années, le développement des différentes imageries métabo - liques et fonctionnelles, comme l’imagerie par émission de positons (PET-CT) et la résonnance magnétique fonctionnelle, ouvrent de nouvelles possibilités thérapeutiques grâce aux informations qu’elles apportent sur la biologie des tumeurs. Cet article décrit, de manière non exhaustive, les différentes imageries anatomiques et métaboliques à la disposition du radiothérapeute. [less ▲]

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See detailImagerie de l'intégrine αvβ3 par PET/CT au 18F-FPRGD2
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; HUSTINX, Roland ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(Synthèse 2014), 36-40

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See detailFDG PET/CT for rectal carcinoma radiotherapy treatment planning : Comparison of functional volume delineation algorithms and clinical challenges.
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; BERNARD, Claire ULg; VAN DER REST, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics (2014), 15(5), 216-228

PET/CT imaging could improve delineation of rectal carcinoma gross tumor volume (GTV) and reduce interobserver variability. The objective of this work was to compare various functional volume delineation ... [more ▼]

PET/CT imaging could improve delineation of rectal carcinoma gross tumor volume (GTV) and reduce interobserver variability. The objective of this work was to compare various functional volume delineation algorythms. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging osteoarthritis using (18F)FPRGD2 PET/CT : observation and potential application.
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; ALVAREZ MIEZENTSEVA, Victoria ULg; SIMONI, Paolo ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2013), 54(SUPPL), 250

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See detailBone mass of the calvarium
SIMONI, Paolo ULg; STULKO, Jennifer ULg; BEN MUSTAPHA, Selma ULg et al

in Skeletal Radiology (2013), 42

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See detailTwist1 suppresses senescence programs and thereby accelerates and maintains mutant Kras-induced lung tumorigenesis.
Tran, Phuoc T.; Shroff, Emelyn H.; Burns, Timothy F. et al

in PLoS genetics (2012), 8(5), 1002650

KRAS mutant lung cancers are generally refractory to chemotherapy as well targeted agents. To date, the identification of drugs to therapeutically inhibit K-RAS have been unsuccessful, suggesting that ... [more ▼]

KRAS mutant lung cancers are generally refractory to chemotherapy as well targeted agents. To date, the identification of drugs to therapeutically inhibit K-RAS have been unsuccessful, suggesting that other approaches are required. We demonstrate in both a novel transgenic mutant Kras lung cancer mouse model and in human lung tumors that the inhibition of Twist1 restores a senescence program inducing the loss of a neoplastic phenotype. The Twist1 gene encodes for a transcription factor that is essential during embryogenesis. Twist1 has been suggested to play an important role during tumor progression. However, there is no in vivo evidence that Twist1 plays a role in autochthonous tumorigenesis. Through two novel transgenic mouse models, we show that Twist1 cooperates with Kras(G12D) to markedly accelerate lung tumorigenesis by abrogating cellular senescence programs and promoting the progression from benign adenomas to adenocarcinomas. Moreover, the suppression of Twist1 to physiological levels is sufficient to cause Kras mutant lung tumors to undergo senescence and lose their neoplastic features. Finally, we analyzed more than 500 human tumors to demonstrate that TWIST1 is frequently overexpressed in primary human lung tumors. The suppression of TWIST1 in human lung cancer cells also induced cellular senescence. Hence, TWIST1 is a critical regulator of cellular senescence programs, and the suppression of TWIST1 in human tumors may be an effective example of pro-senescence therapy. [less ▲]

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See detail(18F)FPRGD2 PET/CT imaging of integrin αvβ3 in renal carcinomas : correlation with histopathology.
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; SIGNOLLE, N.; NZARAMBA, EM. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2012), 53(SUPPL), 1647

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See detailAcute intramural haematoma of the ascending aorta.
Govaerts, L.; WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; Durieux, R. et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2012), 39(8), 1368-9

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See detailImagerie des métastases osseuses du cancer du sein
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg; HUSTINX, Roland ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 291-298

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