References of "Willems, Sylvie"
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See detailThe impact of the salience of fluency in recognition memory in Alzheimer’s disease
Simon, Jessica ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2013, December 06)

According to the dual-process models, recognition memory is supported by recollection and familiarity (Yonelinas, 2002). Familiarity is a complex function that depends on several processes. One of the ... [more ▼]

According to the dual-process models, recognition memory is supported by recollection and familiarity (Yonelinas, 2002). Familiarity is a complex function that depends on several processes. One of the most important mechanisms is the sense of familiarity driven by the fluency processing (Whittlesea, 1993). The fluency can be defined by the enhancement of processing speed and the ease of processing due to an earlier encounter with the stimulus. Our objective is to explore the effect on an increase of salience of fluency cues on the recognition memory performance of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Sixteen AD patients and sixteen healthy elderly controls (HC) performed two conditions of a memory task. In the study phase, 25 words were presented at a rate of one word every 1.5s. Participants were instructed to read the words aloud and to try and remember them. After a break of 5 minutes, participant performed a yes/no recognition task with 25 studied words and 25 new words. In the Non-Overlap condition, the 25 studied words were composed of a subset of letters of the alphabet and the 25 new words of the remaining letters. In the Overlap condition, the 50 words were based on the whole alphabet. The two recognition tasks were separated by a delay of 24h. The capacity to discriminate between old and new items was measured by the index d’. An ANOVA on d’ scores revealed that discrimination was poorer in the AD group than in the HC and also poorer in the Overlap condition than in the Non-Overlap condition. The current results showed that to increase salience of fluency at the level of letter by eliminating letter-overlap between old and new words increases the recognition performance to the same extent in both groups but the amplitude of AD memory deficit was not reduced (Bastin, Willems, Genon, & Salmon, 2013). [less ▲]

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See detailIntact procedural motor sequence learning in developmental coordination disorder
Lejeune, Caroline ULg; Catale, Corinne ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg et al

in Research in Developmental Disabilities (2013), 34(6), 1974-1981

The purpose of the present study was to explore the possibility of a procedural learning deficit among children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). We tested 34 children aged 6–12 years with ... [more ▼]

The purpose of the present study was to explore the possibility of a procedural learning deficit among children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). We tested 34 children aged 6–12 years with and without DCD using the serial reaction time task, in which the standard keyboard was replaced by a touch screen in order to minimize the impact of perceptuomotor coordination difficulties that characterize this disorder. The results showed that children with DCD succeed as well as control children at the procedural sequence learning task. These findings challenge the hypothesis that a procedural learning impairment underlies the difficulties of DCD children in acquiring and automatizing daily activities. We suggest that the previously reported impairment of children with DCD on the serial reaction time task is not due to a sequence learning deficit per se, but rather due to methodological factors such as the response mode used in these studies. [less ▲]

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See detailCPLU - rapport d'activité 2012
Willems, Sylvie ULg

Report (2013)

Rapport reprenant nos prestations, nos équipes, nos cliniciens..

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See detailCONTROLLED AND AUTOMATIC MEMORY RETRIEVAL IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE
Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 8th Panhellenic Interdisciplinary Conference of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders (2013)

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See detailEnhancing the salience of fluency improves recognition memory performance in mild Alzheimer’s disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease [=JAD] (2013), 33

Recognition memory can rely on recollection (recall of the details from the encoding episode) and familiarity (feeling that some information is old without any recollection). In Alzheimer’s disease (AD ... [more ▼]

Recognition memory can rely on recollection (recall of the details from the encoding episode) and familiarity (feeling that some information is old without any recollection). In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), whereas there is a clear deficit of recollection, the evidence regarding familiarity is mixed, with some studies showing preserved familiarity and others reporting impairment. The current study examined whether recognition memory performance can be improved in AD when the use of familiarity is facilitated by the salience of processing fluency due to an earlier encounter with the information. Fifteen AD patients and 16 healthy controls performed a verbal recognition memory task where the salience of fluency was manipulated by means of letters overlap. Studied and unstudied words were constituted of either two separate sets of letters (no-overlap condition, high fluency salience) or the same set of letters (overlap condition, low fluency salience). The results showed that, although performance was globally poorer in AD patients than in the controls, both groups performed significantly better in the no-overlap condition than in the overlap condition. This suggests that AD patients benefited as much as the controls from the salience of fluency. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory impairments in dementia: Which memory and how does it fail?
Salmon, Eric ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

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See detailThe role of the salience of fluency in recognition memory in Alzheimer’s disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg

in Proceedings of the First joint meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences (BAPS) and the Sociedad Española de Psicología Experimental (SEPEX) (2012)

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See detailParental educational level influence on memory and executive performance in children
Catale, Corinne ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg; Lejeune, Caroline ULg et al

in European Review of Applied Psychology = Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée (2012), 62

Introduction. – The influence of Parental Educational Status (PES) on cognitive performance has been confirmed in several studies. Objective. – The aim of this study was to explore the relationship ... [more ▼]

Introduction. – The influence of Parental Educational Status (PES) on cognitive performance has been confirmed in several studies. Objective. – The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between PES and several domains of cognitive functioning and examine, through mediation analyses, the relationship between PES, language,and cognitive tasks. Method. – We first administered tasks measuring memory, executive and attentional abilities to 64 European native French speakers, divided into two groups of children according to parents’ educational status. Results. – The results suggest that, on most tasks, the effect of socio-educational status is mediated by language abilities. However, because the results were less clear for executive functions, we carried out a second experiment in which we administered more specific executive measures (i.e. inhibition, cognitive flexibility, updating and reasoning) to 80 children. Conclusion. – The results confirmed the influence of the parents’ educational status on the executive functioning and also that, contrary to other cognitive functions, this influence on executive tasks is not completely explained by language differences. [less ▲]

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See detailCPLU - rapport d'activité 2011
Willems, Sylvie ULg

Report (2011)

Rapport d'activité de la Clinique Psychologique et Logopédique de l'Université de Liège - 2012

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See detailCPLU - rapport d'activité 2010
Willems, Sylvie ULg

Report (2011)

Rapport d'activité de la Clinique Psychologique et Logopédique de l'Université de Liège - Année 2010

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See detailLa fluence : un indice métacognitif omniprésent pour nos jugements
Willems, Sylvie ULg

Scientific conference (2010, March)

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See detailSemantic Hyperpriming in Normal Aging: A Consequence of Instructions?
Stefaniak, Nicolas ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg

in Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2010), 17(5), 615-632

Semantic hyperpriming has consistently been found in normal aging. However, <br />because the standard instructions to test semantic priming are generally ambiguous <br />(focusing on both accuracy and ... [more ▼]

Semantic hyperpriming has consistently been found in normal aging. However, <br />because the standard instructions to test semantic priming are generally ambiguous <br />(focusing on both accuracy and speed), it is difficult to account for hyperpriming in <br />older adults. By using the direct and mediated priming paradigms, this study investigates <br />whether older adults’ response mode at testing may explain hyperpriming. First, we <br />show that, under identical conditions, inducing a response mode that favors speed leads <br />to greater priming effects in older adults. The pattern of results is similar to what is <br />observed under standard instructions. Second, prompting a response mode that favors <br />accuracy leads to greater priming effects in younger adults. We discuss various explanations <br />for these findings and conclude, in accordance with the Ratcliff, Thapar, <br />Gomez, and McKoon (2004a) diffusion model, that hyperpriming in normal aging is <br />contingent on older adults’ response mode at testing. [less ▲]

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See detailThe mere exposure effect without recognition can depend on the way you look!
Willems, Sylvie ULg; dedonder, jonathan; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Experimental Psychology (2010), 57(3), 185-192

In line with [Whittlesea, B. W. A., & Price, J. R. (2001). Implicit/Explicit memory versus analytic/nonanalytic processing: Rethinking the mere exposure effect. Memory and Cognition, 26, 547-565], we ... [more ▼]

In line with [Whittlesea, B. W. A., & Price, J. R. (2001). Implicit/Explicit memory versus analytic/nonanalytic processing: Rethinking the mere exposure effect. Memory and Cognition, 26, 547-565], we investigated whether the memory effect measured with an implicit memory paradigm (mere exposure effect) and an explicit recognition task depended on perceptual processing strategies, regardless of whether the task required intentional retrieval. We found that manipulation intended to prompt functional implicit-explicit dissociation no longer had a differential effect when we induced similar perceptual strategies in both tasks. Indeed, the results showed that prompting a nonanalytic strategy ensured performance above chance on both tasks. Conversely, inducing an analytic strategy drastically decreased both explicit and implicit performance. Furthermore, we noted that the nonanalytic strategy involved less extensive gaze scanning than the analytic strategy and that memory effects under this processing strategy were largely independent of gaze movement. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of time of day on age-related differences in cognitive tests.
Schmitz, Xavier ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg

Poster (2009, June 03)

Previous studies have shown a shift in the circadian rhythm – and more particularly in the optimal time of day (OTD) – across the adult life span (May et al., 1993). The aim of this study was to ... [more ▼]

Previous studies have shown a shift in the circadian rhythm – and more particularly in the optimal time of day (OTD) – across the adult life span (May et al., 1993). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive efficiency and OTD in 113 healthy old adults (Age: M = 69, SD = 6.1, Range = 60-80) and 175 younger adults (M = 40.8, SD = 12.9, Range = 20-59). Participants performed a large battery of cognitive tests that assessed episodic memory, working memory, executive and attentional functions. Results on the MEQ (Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire; Horne & Östberg, 1976) confirmed the age-related shift toward a self-reported morning preference in older adults. Second, the categorization of participants according to their MEQ scores and the time of testing revealed that the OTD has a greater impact upon cognitive performance in older than in younger adults. Third, the age-related OTD impact was more striking in working memory (Brown-Peterson and Pasat) and episodic memory tasks (Buschke) than in other aspects of the cognitive functioning. In conclusion, older participants tested during their peak circadian periods tend to show greater performance on memory tasks that require careful or strategic processing relative to older participants who are tested at off-peak times of day. Taken together, these findings indicate that care must be taken when investigators are considering the effects of age on effortful memory tasks, which are particularly modulated by OTD in older adults. [less ▲]

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See detailPatients with Alzheimer's disease use metamemory to attenuate the Jacoby-Whitehouse illusion.
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Germain, Sophie ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Neuropsychologia (2009), 47(12), 2672-6

Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) relying predominantly on familiarity for recognition, research has suggested that they may be particularly susceptible to memory illusions driven by conceptual ... [more ▼]

Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) relying predominantly on familiarity for recognition, research has suggested that they may be particularly susceptible to memory illusions driven by conceptual fluency. Using the Jacoby and Whitehouse [Jacoby, L.L., & Whitehouse, K. (1989). An illusion of memory: False recognition influenced by unconscious perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 118, 126-135] illusion paradigm, we extended these findings and found that AD patients were also sensitive to perceptually driven false recognition. However, AD patients were equally able to disregard perceptual fluency when there was a shift in the sensory modality of the study and test stages. Overall, these findings support the notion that patients with AD can be susceptible to fluency-based memory illusions but these patients can strategically control the fluency attribution following their metamemory expectation in exactly the same way as elderly adults and young adults. [less ▲]

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See detailTroubles des émotions et de la cognition sociale. Traité de Neuropsychologie de l’enfant.
Catale, Corinne ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg

in Poncelet, Martine; Majerus, Steve; Van der Linden, Martial (Eds.) Traité de Neuropsychologie de l’enfant (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (7 ULg)