References of "Wijns, William"
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See detailCardiopoietic stem cell therapy in heart failure: the C-CURE (Cardiopoietic stem Cell therapy in heart failURE) multicenter randomized trial with lineage-specified biologics.
Bartunek, Jozef; Behfar, Atta; Dolatabadi, Dariouch et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2013), 61(23), 2329-38

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the feasibility and safety of autologous bone marrow-derived and cardiogenically oriented mesenchymal stem cell therapy and to probe for signs of efficacy in ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the feasibility and safety of autologous bone marrow-derived and cardiogenically oriented mesenchymal stem cell therapy and to probe for signs of efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure. BACKGROUND: In pre-clinical heart failure models, cardiopoietic stem cell therapy improves left ventricular function and blunts pathological remodeling. METHODS: The C-CURE (Cardiopoietic stem Cell therapy in heart failURE) trial, a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial, was conducted in patients with heart failure of ischemic origin who received standard of care or standard of care plus lineage-specified stem cells. In the cell therapy arm, bone marrow was harvested and isolated mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to a cardiogenic cocktail. Derived cardiopoietic stem cells, meeting release criteria under Good Manufacturing Practice, were delivered by endomyocardial injections guided by left ventricular electromechanical mapping. Data acquisition and analysis were performed in blinded fashion. The primary endpoint was feasibility/safety at 2-year follow-up. Secondary endpoints included cardiac structure/function and measures of global clinical performance 6 months post-therapy. RESULTS: Mesenchymal stem cell cocktail-based priming was achieved for each patient with the dose attained in 75% and delivery without complications in 100% of cases. There was no evidence of increased cardiac or systemic toxicity induced by cardiopoietic cell therapy. Left ventricular ejection fraction was improved by cell therapy (from 27.5 +/- 1.0% to 34.5 +/- 1.1%) versus standard of care alone (from 27.8 +/- 2.0% to 28.0 +/- 1.8%, p < 0.0001) and was associated with a reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume (-24.8 +/- 3.0 ml vs. -8.8 +/- 3.9 ml, p < 0.001). Cell therapy also improved the 6-min walk distance (+62 +/- 18 m vs. -15 +/- 20 m, p < 0.01) and provided a superior composite clinical score encompassing cardiac parameters in tandem with New York Heart Association functional class, quality of life, physical performance, hospitalization, and event-free survival. CONCLUSIONS: The C-CURE trial implements the paradigm of lineage guidance in cell therapy. Cardiopoietic stem cell therapy was found feasible and safe with signs of benefit in chronic heart failure, meriting definitive clinical evaluation. (C-Cure Clinical Trial; NCT00810238). [less ▲]

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See detailReply: The C-CURE Randomized Clinical Trial (Cardiopoietic stem Cell therapy in heart failURE).
Bartunek, Jozef; Behfar, Atta; Dolatabadi, Dariouch et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2013), 62(25), 2454-6

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See detail2013 ESC guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease: the Task Force on the management of stable coronary artery disease of the European Society of Cardiology.
Montalescot, Gilles; Sechtem, Udo; Achenbach, Stephan et al

in European heart journal (2013), 34(38), 2949-3003

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See detailBenefit of revascularization for stable ischaemic heart disease: the jury is still out.
Fassa, Amir-Ali; Wijns, William; Kolh, Philippe ULg et al

in European heart journal (2013), 34(21), 1534-8

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See detailThe new 2011 ACCF/AHA Guidelines on Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery: are they different from the 2010 ESC/EACTS Guidelines on Myocardial Revascularisation?
Kolh, Philippe ULg; Sousa Uva, Miguel; Wijns, William

in EuroIntervention : Journal of EuroPCR in Collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology (2012), 8(1), 33-4

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See detailEssential messages from the ESC/EACTS guidelines on myocardial revascularization.
Kolh, Philippe ULg; Wijns, William

in European Journal of Cardio - Thoracic Surgery (2012), 41(5), 983-5

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See detailJoint ESC/EACTS guidelines on myocardial revascularization.
Kolh, Philippe ULg; Wijns, William

in Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine (Hagerstown, Md.) (2011), 12(4), 264-7

The Guidelines for Myocardial Revascularization of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) are the very first reported consensus document, by ... [more ▼]

The Guidelines for Myocardial Revascularization of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) are the very first reported consensus document, by a writing committee balanced between non-interventional and interventional cardiologists as well as cardiac surgeons, on this specific issue. Given the strong impact that ischaemic heart disease has on the survival and quality of life of the individual as well as the economic implications for society, the importance of the ESC/EACTS guidelines is obvious. [less ▲]

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See detailGuidelines on myocardial revascularization.
Kolh, Philippe ULg; Wijns, William; Danchin, Nicolas et al

in European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery (2010), 38 Suppl

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See detailExperience with revascularization procedures does matter: low volume means worse outcome.
Wijns, William; Kolh, Philippe ULg

in European Heart Journal (2010), 31(16), 1954-7

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See detailESC Forum on Drug Eluting Stents European Heart House, Nice, 27-28 September 2007.
Daemen, Joost; Simoons, Maarten L.; Wijns, William et al

in European heart journal (2009), 30(2), 152-61

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See detailMeeting report ESC forum on drug eluting stents, European Heart House, Nice, 27-28 September 2007.
Daemen, Joost; Simoons, Maarten L.; Wijns, William et al

in EuroIntervention : journal of EuroPCR in collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology (2009), 4(4), 427-36

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See detailAppropriate myocardial revascularization: a joint viewpoint from an interventional cardiologist and a cardiac surgeon.
Wijns, William; Kolh, Philippe ULg

in European Heart Journal (2009), 30(18), 2182-5

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See detailPretreatment of adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with cardiomyogenic growth factors and repair of the chronically infarcted myocardium
Bartunek, Joseph; Croissant, J. D.; Wijns, William et al

in American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology (2007), 292(2), 1095-1104

The in vivo cardiac differentiation and functional effects of unmodified adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after myocardial infarction (MI) is controversial. We postulated that ex vivo ... [more ▼]

The in vivo cardiac differentiation and functional effects of unmodified adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after myocardial infarction (MI) is controversial. We postulated that ex vivo pretreatment of autologous MSCs using cardiomyogenic growth factors will lead to cardiomyogenic specification and will result in superior biological and functional effects on cardiac regeneration of chronically infarcted myocardium. We used a chronic dog MI model generated by ligation of the coronary artery (n = 30). Autologous dog bone marrow MSCs were isolated, culture expanded, and specified into a cardiac lineage by adding growth factors, including basic FGF, IGF-1, and bone morphogenetic protein-2. Dogs underwent cell injection > 8 wk after the infarction and were randomized into two groups. Group A dogs (n = 20) received MSCs specified with growth factors (147 +/- 96 x 10(6)), and group B (n = 10) received unmodified MSCs (168 +/- 24 x 10(6)). After the growth factor treatment, MSCs stained positive for the early muscle and cardiac markers desmin, antimyocyte enhancer factor-2, and Nkx2-5. In group A dogs, prespecified MSCs colocalized with troponin I and cardiac myosin. At 12 wk, group A dogs showed a significantly larger increase in regional wall thickening of the infarcted territory (from 22 +/- 8 to 32 +/- 6% in group A; P < 0.05 vs. baseline and group B, and from 19 +/- 7 to 21 +/- 7% in group B, respectively) and a decrease in the wall motion score index (from 1.60 +/- 0.05 to 1.35 +/- 0.03 in group A; P < 0.05 vs. baseline and group B, and from 1.58 +/- 0.07 vs. 1.56 +/- 0.08 in group B, respectively). The biological ex vivo cardiomyogenic specification of adult MSCs before their transplantation is feasible and appears to improve their in vivo cardiac differentiation as well as the functional recovery in a dog model of the chronically infarcted myocardium. [less ▲]

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See detailA randomized comparison of the value of additional stenting after optimal balloon angioplasty for long coronary lesions: final results of the additional value of NIR stents for treatment of long coronary lesions (ADVANCE) study.
Serruys, Patrick W.; Foley, David P.; Suttorp, Martin Jan et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2002), 39(3), 393-9

OBJECTIVES: We sought to investigate the clinical benefit of additional stent implantation after achieving an optimal result of balloon angioplasty (BA) in long coronary lesions (>20 mm). BACKGROUND: Long ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: We sought to investigate the clinical benefit of additional stent implantation after achieving an optimal result of balloon angioplasty (BA) in long coronary lesions (>20 mm). BACKGROUND: Long coronary lesions are associated with increased early complications and late restenosis after BA. Stenting improves the early outcome, but stent restenosis is also related to both lesion length and stent length. METHODS: A total of 437 patients with a single native lesion 20 to 50 mm in length were included and underwent BA, using long balloons matched to lesion length and vessel diameter (balloon/artery ratio 1.1) to achieve a diameter stenosis (DS) <30% by on-line quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). "Bail-out stenting" was performed for flow-limiting dissections or >50% DS. Patients in whom an optimal BA result was achieved were randomized to additional stenting (using NIR stents) or no stenting. The primary end point was freedom from major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at nine months, and core laboratory QCA was performed on serial angiograms. RESULTS: Bailout stenting was necessary in 149 patients (34%) and was associated with a significantly increased risk of peri-procedural infarction (p < 0.02). Among the 288 randomized patients, the mean lesion length was 27+/-9 mm, and the vessel diameter was 2.78+/-0.52 mm. The procedural success rate was 90% for the 143 patients assigned to BA alone (control group), as compared with 93% in the 145 patients assigned to additional stenting (stent group), which resulted in a superior early minimal lumen diameter (0.54 mm, p < 0.001) and led to reduced angiographic restenosis (27% vs. 42%, p = 0.022). Freedom from MACE at nine months was 77% in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: A strategy of provisional stenting for long coronary lesions led to bailout stenting in one-third of patients, with a threefold increase in peri-procedural infarction. Additional stenting yielded a lower angiographic restenosis rate, but no reduction in MACE at nine months. [less ▲]

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