References of "Wavreille, José"
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See detailEffect of inulin and wheat bran in the creep feed of neonatal piglets
Li, Bing ULg; Leblois, Julie ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 22)

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See detailPrévalence du virus du SDRP dans les élevages porcins
Czaplicki, Guy; Thilmant, Pierre; Van Der Stede, Yves et al

Poster (2015, February)

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) causes major economic losses in pig farms. In different parts of the world, there is growing consensus that PRRS virus (PRRSv) eradication should be ... [more ▼]

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) causes major economic losses in pig farms. In different parts of the world, there is growing consensus that PRRS virus (PRRSv) eradication should be performed on a regional basis, particularly in low density areas of pig production. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the apparent prevalence of PRRSv in Wallonia, a low density area of pig production (0.05 pig farms/km²). A phone survey was addressed to 173 of the 276 Walloon breeding pig owners. One hundred and thirty‐two farmers answered the questionnaire and serological tests were performed in 113 herds. If no vaccination was carried out on sows or on piglets, an Elisa test was performed on 10 breeding and/or 5 feeder pig serum samples collected between November 2011 and December 2012. An individual result was considered negative if the s/p ratio was <0.4; a herd was considered positive if an s/p ratio ≥0.4 was obtained by at least one of its pigs. Globally, at herd level and at animal level, the apparent prevalences were respectively 48% (IC95%: 39 – 57%) and 32 % (IC 95%: 29 – 35%). The present study has shown that half the Walloon breeding pig farms are serologically positive for PRRSv. Such prevalence in an area of low pig production supports the project for a regional PRRS control program. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of sugar beet pulp on feeding behavior, growth performance, carcass quality and gut health of fattening pigs.
Laitat, Martine ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2015), 19(1), 20-31

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See detailEffects of a high-fibre diet on ammonia and greenhouse gas emissions from gestating sows and fattening pigs
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2015), 109

This study aims to measure under barn conditions the emissions of NH3, N2O, CH4 and CO2 associated with gestating sows (trial 1) and fattening pigs (trial 2) fed either a control diet (CTD) based on ... [more ▼]

This study aims to measure under barn conditions the emissions of NH3, N2O, CH4 and CO2 associated with gestating sows (trial 1) and fattening pigs (trial 2) fed either a control diet (CTD) based on cereals or a high-fibre diet (HFD) based on sugar beet pulp (SBP). Three successive batches of 10 Belgian Landrace gestating sows were used for trial 1. Two successive batches of 24 Pi etrain Belgian Landrace fattening pigs were used for trial 2. Animals were kept on slatted floor. The gas emissions were measured by infrared photoacoustic detection and expressed per day and per livestock unit, equals to 500 kg body weight. Similar trends were observed for both animal types. With HFD, the NH3 emissions were reduced (27.2 vs. 36.5 g for the gestating sows, P < 0.001; 23.2 vs. 45.0 g for the fattening pigs, P < 0.001) but the CH4 emissions were increased (41.5 vs. 21.0 g for gestating sows, P < 0.001; 37.9 vs. 27.2 g for fattening pigs, P < 0.001). The fibre content of the diet had not significant impact on N2O emissions (around 1.4 g for gestating sows and 2.1 g for fattening pigs, P > 0.05), and on CO2 emissions (around 6.0 kg for gestating sows and 9.1 kg for fattening pigs, P > 0.05). Most of manure parameters did not statistically differ regarding the treatment. Reproductive performance and body condition of the sows were not affected by the diet. However, growth performance and carcass traits of the HFD-fed fattening pigs were deteriorated compared to CTD. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic parameters for individual birth weight, weaning weight and final weight of crossbred pigs from Piétrain boars
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Wavreille, José; Piedboeuf, Maureen et al

Poster (2014, August)

Genetic parameters for birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WWT), and final weight (BW) were estimated for crossbred pigs from Piétrain boars raised in test station. Estimates of direct heritability were ... [more ▼]

Genetic parameters for birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WWT), and final weight (BW) were estimated for crossbred pigs from Piétrain boars raised in test station. Estimates of direct heritability were moderate (0.25 to 0.42), suggesting that genetic improvement of growth would be possible. Estimates of maternal heritability were 0.24 for BWT and WWT, and 0.05 for BW, indicating that the genetic influence of the dam on growth was not negligible until weaning. Genetic correlations between direct and maternal effects for BWT and WWT were moderate and unfavorable (-0.52 and -0.57 respectively). Direct genetic correlations were high and favorable between traits (0.40 to 0.75), suggesting that a high BWT is a good predictor to produce pigs with high final weight. Maternal genetic correlations between traits were low (0.01 to 0.03). Selection for higher BWT would increase final market weight but should be balanced with survival traits. [less ▲]

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See detailQuel système d'évaluations génétiques pour les verrats Piétrain en Wallonie
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Piedboeuf, Maureen; Wavreille, José et al

Article for general public (2014)

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See detailEffects of dietary fibre and floor type on greenhouse gas and ammonia emissions associated with gestating sows
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 1st FARAH Day, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (Liège – Belgium) (2014)

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See detailEstimation of dominance variance for live body weight in a crossbred population of pigs
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Faux, Pierre ULg; Piedboeuf, Maureen et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2014), 92

The objective of this study was to estimate the dominance variance for repeated live BW records in a crossbred population of pigs. Data were provided by the Walloon Pig Breeding Association and included ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to estimate the dominance variance for repeated live BW records in a crossbred population of pigs. Data were provided by the Walloon Pig Breeding Association and included 22,197 BW records of 2,999 crossbred Piétrain × Landrace K+ pigs from 50 to 210 d of age. The BW records were standardized and adjusted to 210 d of age for analysis. Three single-trait random regression animal models were used: Model 1 without parental subclass effect, Model 2 with parental subclasses considered unrelated, and Model 3 with the complete parental dominance relationship matrix. Each model included sex, contemporary group, and heterosis as fixed effects as well as additive genetic, permanent environment, and residual as random effects. Variance components and their SE were estimated using a Gibbs sampling algorithm. Heritability tended to increase with age: from 0.50 to 0.64 for Model 1, from 0.19 to 0.42 for Model 2, and from 0.31 to 0.53 for Model 3. Permanent environmental variance tended to decrease with age and accounted for 29 to 44% of total variance with Model 1, 29 to 37% of total variance with Model 2, and 34 to 51% of total variance with Model 3. Residual variance explained <10% of total variance for the 3 models. Dominance variance was computed as 4 times the estimated parental subclass variance. Dominance variance accounted for 22 to 40% of total variance for Model 2 and 5 to 11% of total variance for Model 3, with a decrease with age for both models. Results showed that dominance effects exist for growth traits in pigs and may be reasonably large. The use of the complete dominance relationship matrix may improve the estimation of additive genetic variances and breeding values. Moreover, a dominance effect could be especially useful in selection programs for individual matings through the use of specific combining ability to maximize growth potential of crossbred progeny. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic parameters for individual birth weight, weaning weight and final weight of crossbred pigs from Piétrain boars
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Wavreille, José; Piedboeuf, Maureen et al

Poster (2014)

Genetic parameters for birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WWT), and final weight (BW) were estimated for crossbred pigs from Piétrain boars raised in test station. Estimates of direct heritability were ... [more ▼]

Genetic parameters for birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WWT), and final weight (BW) were estimated for crossbred pigs from Piétrain boars raised in test station. Estimates of direct heritability were moderate (0.25 to 0.42), suggesting that genetic improvement of growth would be possible. Estimates of maternal heritability were 0.24 for BWT and WWT, and 0.05 for BW, indicating that the genetic influence of the dam on growth was not negligible until weaning. Genetic correlations between direct and maternal effects for BWT and WWT were moderate and unfavorable (-0.52 and -0.57 respectively). Direct genetic correlations were high and favorable between traits (0.40 to 0.75), suggesting that a high BWT is a good predictor to produce pigs with high final weight. Maternal genetic correlations between traits were low (0.01 to 0.03). Selection for higher BWT would increase final market weight but should be balanced with survival traits. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of dominance variance for growth traits with sire-dam subclass effects in a crossbred population of pigs
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Faux, Pierre ULg; Piedboeuf, Maureen et al

Poster (2014)

Nonadditive genetic effects may be not negligible but are often ignored in genetic evaluations. The most important nonadditive effect is probably dominance. Prediction of dominance effects should allow a ... [more ▼]

Nonadditive genetic effects may be not negligible but are often ignored in genetic evaluations. The most important nonadditive effect is probably dominance. Prediction of dominance effects should allow a more precise estimation of the total genetic merit, particularly in populations that use specialized sire and dam lines, and with large number of full-sibs, like pigs. Computation of the inverted dominance relationship matrix, D-1, is difficult with large datasets. But, D-1 can be replaced by the inverted sire-dam subclass relationship matrix F-1, which represents the average dominance effect of full-sibs. The aim of this study was to estimate dominance variance for longitudinal measurements of body weight (BW) in a crossbred population of pigs The dataset consisted of 20,120 BW measurements recorded between 50 and 210 d of age on 2,341 crossbred pigs (Piétrain X Landrace). A random regression model was used to estimate variance components. Fixed effects were sex and date of recording. Random effects were additive genetic, permanent environment, parental dominance and residual. Dominance variance represented 7 to 9% of the total variance and 11 to 30% of additive variance. Those results showed that dominance variance exists for growth traits in pigs and may be relatively large. The estimation of dominance effects may be useful for mate selection program to maximize genetic merit of progeny. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of dominance variance with sire-dam subclass effects in a crossbred population of pigs
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Faux, Pierre ULg; Piedboeuf, Maureen et al

Poster (2013, August 26)

Nonadditive genetic effects may be not negligible but are often ignored in genetic evaluations. The most important nonadditive effect is probably dominance. Prediction of dominance effects should allow a ... [more ▼]

Nonadditive genetic effects may be not negligible but are often ignored in genetic evaluations. The most important nonadditive effect is probably dominance. Prediction of dominance effects should allow a more precise estimation of the total genetic merit, particularly in populations that use specialized sire and dam lines, and with large number of full-sibs, like pigs. Computation of the inverted dominance relationship matrix, D-1, is difficult with large datasets. But, D-1 can be replaced by the inverted sire-dam subclass relationship matrix F-1, which represents the average dominance effect of full-sibs. The aim of this study was to estimate dominance variance for longitudinal measurements of body weight (BW) in a crossbred population of pigs, assuming unrelated sire-dam subclass effects. The edited dataset consisted of 20,120 BW measurements recorded between 50 and 210 d of age on 2,341 crossbred pigs from 89 Piétrain sires and 169 Landrace dams. A random regression model was used to estimate variance components. Fixed effects were sex and date of recording. Random effects were additive genetic, permanent environment, sire-dam subclass and residual. Random effects, except residual, were modeled with linear splines. Only full-sib contributions were considered by using uncorrelated sire-dam classes. Estimated heritability of BW increased with age from 0.40 to 0.60. Inversely, estimated dominance decreased with age, from 0.28 to 0.01. Ratio of dominance relative to additive variance was high at early age (58.3% at 50 d) and decreased with age (2.6% at 200 d). Those results showed that dominance effects might be important for early growth traits in pigs. However, this need to be confirmed and dominance relationships will be included in the next steps. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic analysis of longitudinal measurements of feed intake in Piétrain sire lines
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Jaspart, Véronique; Wavreille, José et al

Poster (2013, July 10)

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See detailPrevalence of PRRS virus in Wallonia (Belgium)
Czaplicki, Guy; Thilmant, Pierre ULg; Hooyberghs, Josef et al

Poster (2013, May 22)

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) causes major economical losses in pig farms. In different parts of the world, there is a growing consensus that PRRS virus (PRRSv) eradication should ... [more ▼]

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) causes major economical losses in pig farms. In different parts of the world, there is a growing consensus that PRRS virus (PRRSv) eradication should be performed on a regional basis, particularly in low density areas of pig production. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the apparent prevalence of PRRSv in Wallonia, a low density area of pig production (0.05 pig farms/km²). At this stage of the study, a phone survey has been addressed to 61/276 Walloon breeding pig owners. Fifty-eight answered to the questionnaire: 51 are responsible of a farrow-to-finish farm, 6 of a farrowing farm and 1 of a PRRS-free boar station. In 35% of the tested farms, sows are vaccinated with a modified live virus (MLV) PRRS vaccine (n=11) or with a killed PRRS vaccine (n=9). In two farms, both sows and piglets are vaccinated with a MLV PRRS vaccine. Replacement gilts are purchased in 33% farms. Among the 38 farms raising replacement gilts, 39% purchase boar(s). Boar semen is purchased in 86% of the farms: 56% purchase only boar semen; 30% purchase both semen and boar(s) and 14% of farms only purchase boar(s). In 22/57 tested farms, clinical signs evocative of PRRSv infection were observed over the last 10 years. In 30 farms a PRRS diagnostic test was performed in the past with a positive result in 17. When the pig owner did agree and if no vaccination was carried out on sows or on piglets, a serological Elisa test was performed in 10 breeding pigs and/or 5 feeder pigs >70 kg (or in all available sera if a smaller number of pigs was present). Globally, at herd level and at animal level, the apparent prevalence were respectively 35.2% (95% CI: 23.0-47.4%) and 23.4% (95% CI: 20.1-26.6%). [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of the void percentage of the floor on ammonia and greenhouse gas emissions for group-housed gestating sows.
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (2013)

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See detailImpact of the amount of straw on emissions of ammonia and greenhouse gases associated with fattening pigs kept on deep litter
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (2013)

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See detailComparison of ammonia and greenhouse gases emissions associated to fattening pigs kept either on fully or partly slatted floor
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (2013)

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See detailEffect of a fibrous diet on growth performance, carcass characteristics and gut health of fattening pigs
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (2013)

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See detailGenetic analysis of longitudinal measurements of feed intake in Piétrain sire lines
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Jaspart, Véronique; Wavreille, José et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2013), 91(E-Suppl.2), 293

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (9 ULg)