References of "Wang, W"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailGroundwater - surface water interaction at the catchment scale - case studies in the Meuse basin
Bürger, Claudius M.; Watanabe, N.; Orban, Philippe ULg et al

in Davis, G. B.; Johntson, C. D.; Trefry, M. G. (Eds.) Groundwater Quality 2007 Securing Groundwater Quality in Urban and Industrial Environments (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAuditory evoked potentials and multiple personality measures in migraine and post-traumatic headaches.
Wang, W.; Wang, Y.-H.; Fu, X. M. et al

in Pain (1999), 79(2-3), 235-42

Migraine sufferers have abnormal cerebral information processing and personality disorders, post-traumatic headache sufferers also have some personality changes. We therefore, studied intensity dependence ... [more ▼]

Migraine sufferers have abnormal cerebral information processing and personality disorders, post-traumatic headache sufferers also have some personality changes. We therefore, studied intensity dependence of auditory evoked potentials, Plutchik-van Praag's depression inventory, Zuckerman's sensation seeking scales and Zuckerman-Kuhlman's personality questionnaire in patients suffering from migraine without aura (n = 26) and chronic post-traumatic headaches (n = 26) as well as in healthy volunteers (n = 30). The migraine group showed significantly increased neuroticism-anxiety than controls, increased intensity dependence of N1-P2, and decreased thrill and adventure score compared with the controls and post-traumatic headaches. The post-traumatic headache had significantly increased depression compared with the controls, and increased disinhibition compared with the controls and migraines. This study demonstrates that the two headache types have different neurophysiological and personality traits. The pronounced intensity dependence of N1-P2 suggests a cortical potentiation response, together with a decreased thrill and adventure seeking, favor a lower serotonergic innervation in migraine. While the elevated disinhibition and depression, as consequences, may be linked with the wide cortical neuronal/axonal degeneration in post-traumatic headache. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInterictal Potentiation of Passive "Oddball" Auditory Event-Related Potentials in Migraine
Wang, W.; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (1998), 18(5), 261-5241

We have studied habituation of the P3a component of the passive "oddball" auditory event-related potential which reflects automatic processing of a "novel" stimulus in 24 patients suffering from migraine ... [more ▼]

We have studied habituation of the P3a component of the passive "oddball" auditory event-related potential which reflects automatic processing of a "novel" stimulus in 24 patients suffering from migraine without aura and in 21 healthy volunteers. Three blocks of responses to 160 standard and to 40 novel tones were sequentially averaged at Cz and analyzed for latencies and peak-to-peak amplitudes. Latencies of components N1 and P2 elicited by standard tones and of components N1, P2, N2, and P3a elicited by novel tones were not significantly different between sequential blocks or between subject groups, nor were mean N1-P2 amplitudes. The N2-P3a amplitude tended to be lower in migraine, but not significantly so. The most striking result in migraineurs was a significant potentiation of N2-P3a in successive blocks, contrasting with an habituation in controls. Our previous evoked- and event-related potential studies and the present one suggest that deficient habituation, or even potentiation, represents interictally a fundamental dysfunction of cortical information processing in migraine, which might increase energy demands and play a role in etiopathogenesis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
See detailTension-type headache
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Wang, W.

in Goadsby, P. J.; Silberstein, S. J. (Eds.) Headache (1997)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntensity Dependence of Auditory Evoked Potentials Is Pronounced in Migraine: An Indication of Cortical Potentiation and Low Serotonergic Neurotransmission?
Wang, W.; Timsit-Berthier, M.; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Neurology (1996), 46(5), 1404-9

Migraine is associated with stimulus hypersensitivity, increased evoked cortical responses, and abnormal 5-HT levels in peripheral blood. We studied cortical auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) between ... [more ▼]

Migraine is associated with stimulus hypersensitivity, increased evoked cortical responses, and abnormal 5-HT levels in peripheral blood. We studied cortical auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) between attacks in 35 patients suffering from migraine without aura (MO, n = 25) or with aura (MA, n = 10) and in 25 healthy volunteers. Binaural tones were delivered at 40, 50, 60, and 70 dB sensation level (SL) in a pseudorandomized order. The intensity dependence of the auditory N1-P2 component was significantly greater in MO (p = 0.003) and MA (p = 0.02) patients than in healthy controls, resulting in a much steeper amplitude/stimulus intensity function slope. When three sequential blocks of 40 averaged responses were analyzed at the 40- and 70-dB SL intensities, N1-P2 amplitude decreased in second and third blocks at both intensities in controls, but increased in migraineurs, a difference that was significant in both blocks for the 70-dB SL stimulus. The strong interictal dependence of AEPs on stimulus intensity may thus be due to potentiation (instead of habituation) of the response during repetition of the high-intensity stimulation. In concordance with previous studies of visual evoked potentials, these results confirm that migraine is characterized between attacks by an abnormality of cortical information processing, which might be a consequence of low 5-HT transmission and favor cortical energy demands. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSuppression of Voluntary Temporalis Muscle Activity by Peripheral Limb Stimulations in Healthy Volunteers, Migraineurs and Tension-Type Headache Sufferes
Wang, W.; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Functional Neurology (1996), 11(6, Nov-Dec), 307-15

We studied the inhibition of voluntary temporalis muscle activity after stimulations of extracephalic cutaneous or mixed nerves in 23 healthy volunteers, 29 patients suffering from migraine without aura ... [more ▼]

We studied the inhibition of voluntary temporalis muscle activity after stimulations of extracephalic cutaneous or mixed nerves in 23 healthy volunteers, 29 patients suffering from migraine without aura, 24 from episodic and 42 from chronic tension-type headache. Two successive EMG suppressions were induced bilaterally after stimulating at 40 mA the index finger or the median nerve, but not after stimulations of the sural or peroneal nerves. They differed from those obtained after labial commissure stimulation at 20 mA, i.e. the classic temporalis silent periods ES1 and ES2. Overall prevalence of index- (3%) and median nerve-induced (16%) early suppression was much lower than that of labial-induced ES1 (100%); prevalence of index-induced late suppression (index-"ES2") was 62% and that of median-"ES2" 48%, compared with 97% for labial-ES2. Latency and duration of index-/median-"ES2" were not significantly different between groups. Index-"ES2" occurred significantly more often in migraineurs (83%) than in controls (48%) suggesting that the spino-bulbar pathways involved in index-/median-"ES2" are hyperexcitable in migraine. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpecificity and Sensitivity of Temporalis Es2 Measurements in the Diagnosis of Chronic Primary Headaches
Wang, W.; De Pasqua, Victor ULg; Gérard, P. et al

in Headache (1995), 35(2), 85-8

We have evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of temporalis ES2 measurements for the diagnosis of primary headaches. Ninety-four outpatients diagnosed according to IHS criteria were prospectively ... [more ▼]

We have evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of temporalis ES2 measurements for the diagnosis of primary headaches. Ninety-four outpatients diagnosed according to IHS criteria were prospectively included: 25 had chronic tension-type headache (code 2.2.), 15 episodic tension-type headache (code 2.1.), 20 migraine without aura (code 1.1.) and 34 chronic daily headaches with daily analgesics/ergotamine abuse (code 8.2.). In chronic tension-type, the sensitivity of the ES2 test was 84% at the 0.1 and the 0.5 Hz, but only 56% at the 2Hz stimulation rates. Its specificity was 100% at 0.1Hz, 90% at 0.5Hz and 95% at 2Hz compared to migraine; positive predictive values were at similar levels. Sensitivity of ES2 at 0.1 Hz was 67% in episodic tension-type headache, but its positive predictive value versus migraine was excellent. Comparing chronic tension-type headache and analgesic abusers, the specificity and positive predictive value of the ES2 test for diagnosing chronic tension-type headache were less satisfactory (60%) while the negative predictive values, however, remained good (83% at 0.1Hz). The results confirm that the temporalis ES2 test has a higher diagnostic sensitivity in chronic and episodic tension-type headache, but that it has a high negative predictive value for both types of tension-type headache compared to other primary headaches. For diagnostic purposes, the 0.1Hz stimulation rate seems optimal. The 2Hz stimulation rate is the least sensitive, although it may induce total disappearance of ES2 in up to 40% of patients. ES2 is of limited usefulness for separating chronic tension-type headache and chronic drug-abuse headache, possibly because the latter group comprises both tension-type headache and migraine patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPotentiation instead of habituation characterizes visual evoked potentials in migraine patients between attacks
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Wang, W.; Albert, A. et al

in European Journal of Neurology (1995), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCognitive Functions in Migraine without Aura between Attacks: A Psychophysiological Approach Using The "Oddball" Paradigm
Wang, W.; Schoenen, Jean ULg; Timsit-Berthier, M.

in Neurophysiologie Clinique = Clinical Neurophysiology (1995), 25(1), 3-11

"Oddball" paradigm studies of auditory P300 have yielded conflicting results in migraine. We therefore undertook an additional study of auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) using an improved method of ... [more ▼]

"Oddball" paradigm studies of auditory P300 have yielded conflicting results in migraine. We therefore undertook an additional study of auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) using an improved method of EEG processing, strict criteria for patients selection, and comparison with behavioral data. Twenty-one healthy subjects were compared to 20 patients suffering from migraine without aura between attacks. Migraine patients differed significantly from control subjects on several parameters: shorter latency of N1 (Cz) evoked by standard stimuli, longer latencies of both P3a and P3b (Pz) evoked by target stimuli, longer interval between N1 and P3b (Cz), smaller P3b (Cz) amplitude, longer reaction time (RT), higher number of errors (false alarm and/or omissions) and higher mean score on Plutchik-Van Praag's (PVP) inventory for depression. Errors were significantly correlated with RT and PVP scores. From a behavioral perspective, these results may suggest that patients suffering from migraine without aura between attacks display a higher level of arousal and more superficial attention, but require more time for automatic and/or voluntary processes. According to the inverted U-shaped relationship between performance and arousal, these patients may have difficulties in adjusting their attention level to perform a task in a optimal way. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailReduction of Temporalis Exteroceptive Suppression by Peripheral Electrical Stimulation in Migraine and Tension-Type Headaches
Wang, W.; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Pain (1994), 59(3), 327-34

Inhibition of the second exteroceptive suppression of temporalis muscle activity (ES2) produced by a preceding electrical stimulus applied at the index was studied in patients suffering from migraine ... [more ▼]

Inhibition of the second exteroceptive suppression of temporalis muscle activity (ES2) produced by a preceding electrical stimulus applied at the index was studied in patients suffering from migraine without aura (MO), chronic (CTH) or episodic (ETH) tension-type headache. Each patient group comprised of 12 subjects was compared to a group of healthy controls. Mean duration of unconditioned ES2, measured on 10 averaged rectified responses after labial stimulation at a 0.1 Hz frequency, was reduced in CTH only. From stimulation intensities of 20 mA onward, peripheral-induced inhibition of temporalis ES2 was significantly more pronounced in both subtypes of tension-type headache compared to migraineurs or controls. After an index finger stimulus of 20 mA, temporalis ES2 was abolished in 83% of CTH, 67% of ETH, 25% of MO patients and 8% of controls, whereas unconditioned ES2 was present in all patients. Among 9 ETH patients with normal (> or = 32 msec) unconditioned ES2, 5 had total disappearance of ES2 after a 20 mA index stimulation. These results demonstrate that peripheral conditioning at 20 mA increases the diagnostic sensitivity of ES2 studies. They suggest that the changes observed in tension-type headache are due to hyperexcitability of the reticular nuclei which inhibit the medullary inhibitory interneurons mediating ES2. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailModulation of Temporalis Muscle Exteroceptive Suppression by Limb Stimuli in Normal Man
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Wang, W.; Gérard, P.

in Brain Research (1994), 657(1-2), 214-20

The effects of noxious and non-noxious limb stimulations on the second exteroceptive suppression of voluntary temporalis muscle activity (ES2) were studied in healthy human volunteers. Duration of ... [more ▼]

The effects of noxious and non-noxious limb stimulations on the second exteroceptive suppression of voluntary temporalis muscle activity (ES2) were studied in healthy human volunteers. Duration of temporalis ES2 was measured on averaged rectified responses obtained after stimulating the labial commissure at an intensity of 25 mA. Single peripheral electrical stimuli applied over nerve trunks or over the skin before the labial stimulus decreased ES2 duration. This effect was most pronounced after cutaneous stimuli, especially of the index finger, and it was not observed when the conditioning stimulus was a 10 second, high frequency train. For stimulation at the index finger, temporalis ES2 inhibition progressively increased with intensity from 10 mA to 40 mA; it was maximal for an interstimulus interval between 50 and 140 ms. After naloxone (0.4 mg or 4 mg, i.v.) there was a partial reversal of the index-induced ES2 depression, but this effect was not significant. Immersion of one hand in water heated at 47 degrees C produced a short-lasting ES2 reduction. These results are comparable, though not similar, to the inhibition of the digastric reflex (or jaw opening reflex) observed in animals after limb stimuli and to the depression of the spinal flexion reflex reported in man after heterotopic peripheral stimuli. Although peripheral stimuli were able by themselves to suppress temporalis EMG activity in some subjects, it is likely that they reduce labial-induced ES2 via activation of brainstem structures, such as periaqueductal gray matter or raphe magnus nucleus, which are thought to inhibit the medullary inhibitory interneurons mediating ES2. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)