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See detailCinacalcet treatment at the time of transplantation is associated with a significant risk of delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients
Jouret, François ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; GROSCH, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Transplant International (2014, May), 27(S1), 167

The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has been implicated in the ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R) cascade in heart, liver and brain. Renal I/R occurs at the time of transplantation (Tx), with a deleterious ... [more ▼]

The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has been implicated in the ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R) cascade in heart, liver and brain. Renal I/R occurs at the time of transplantation (Tx), with a deleterious impact on early graft function. Here, we retrospectively investigated if the use of cinacalcet, a CaSR agonist, in kidney transplant recipients (KTR) influences early graft recovery. All KTR from 2007 to 2012 in our Academic Hospital were prospectively included in a database. Patients actively treated with cinacalcet on the day of Tx were retrospectively identified from this database and matched with controls on (i) type of donor (living [LD], deceased after brain or circulatory death [DCD]); (ii) cold ischemic time (CIT) ` 1 h; (iii) residual diuresis (` 500 ml); and (iv) donor age (` 5 years). Delayed graft function (DGF) was defined as dialysis requirement after Tx. Baseline characteristics were compared between groups with student’s t-test or Chi-2 as appropriate. The endpoint was the percentage of DGF in both groups. Among 337 KTR, 36 (10.7%) were treated with cinacalcet at Tx. Control group included 61 patients. Characteristics of patients and donors are summarized in the table. DGF occurred in 42 and 23% of cinacalcet-treated and control groups, respectively (p = 0.05). These retro- spective observations suggest that CaSR activation at the time of Tx impairs early graft recovery. [less ▲]

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See detailA More Than 20% Increase in Deceased-Donor Organ Procurement and Transplantation Activity After the Use of Donation After Circulatory Death.
Le Dinh, H.; MONARD, Josée ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplantation proceedings (2014), 46(1), 9-13

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the transplant and donation after brain death (DBD) activities. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Deceased donor (DD) procurement and transplant data were prospectively collected in a local database for retrospective review. RESULTS: There was an increasing trend in the potential and actual DCD numbers over time. DCD accounted for 21.9% of the DD pool over 11 years, representing 23.7% and 24.2% of the DD kidney and liver pool, respectively. The DBD retrieval and transplant activity increased during the same time period. Mean conversion rate turning potential into effective DCD donors was 47.3%. Mean DCD donor age was 54.6 years (range, 3-83). Donors >/=60 years old made up 44.1% of the DCD pool. Among referred donors, reasons for nondonation were medical contraindications (33.7%) and family refusals (19%). Mean organ yield per DCD donor was 2.3 organs. Mean total procurement warm ischemia time was 19.5 minutes (range, 6-39). In 2012, 17 DCD and 37 DBD procurements were performed in the Liege region, which has slightly >1 million inhabitants. CONCLUSIONS: This DCD program implementation enlarged the DD pool and did not compromise the development of DBD programs. The potential DCD pool might be underused and seems to be a valuable organ donor source. [less ▲]

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See detailTwo novel mutations of the CLDN16 gene cause familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis
Hanssen, Oriane ULg; CASTERMANS, Emilie ULg; BOVY, Christophe ULg et al

in Clinical Kidney Journal (2014), 7

Familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is an autosomal-recessive disease caused by mutations in the CLDN16 or CLDN19 genes, which encode tight junction-associated proteins ... [more ▼]

Familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is an autosomal-recessive disease caused by mutations in the CLDN16 or CLDN19 genes, which encode tight junction-associated proteins, claudin-16 and -19. The resultant tubulopathy leads to urinary loss of Mg2+ and Ca2+, with subsequent nephrocalcinosis and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). An 18-year-old boy presented with chronic kidney disease and proteinuria, as well as hypomagnesaemia, hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. A kidney biopsy revealed tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis and segmental sclerosis of some glomeruli. Two novel mutations in the CLDN16 gene were identified: c.340C>T (nonsense) and c.427+5G>A (splice site). The patient reached ESRD at 23 and benefited from kidney transplantation. [less ▲]

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See detailEculizumab (ECU) Inhibits Thrombotic Microangiopathy (TMA) and Improves Renal Function In Adult Patients (Pts) With Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS)
Fakhouri, Fadi; Hourmant, Maryvonne; Cataland, Spero et al

Poster (2013, December 08)

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See detailEculizumab (ECU) Inhibits Thrombotic Microangiopathy (TMA) and Improves Renal Function in Adult Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS) Patients (Pts)
Fakhouri, Fadi; Hourmant, Maryvonne; Campistol, Josep et al

Poster (2013, November 08)

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See detailBlood pressure dipping and arterial stiffness in kidney transplant recipients
XHIGNESSE, Patricia ULg; Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2013, October 05)

In 70 kidney transplant recipients, nocturnal blood pressure(BP) nondipping (nondipping or reversed rhythm) was highly frequent (48% were nondippers and 29% had a reversed rhythm). When compared dippers ... [more ▼]

In 70 kidney transplant recipients, nocturnal blood pressure(BP) nondipping (nondipping or reversed rhythm) was highly frequent (48% were nondippers and 29% had a reversed rhythm). When compared dippers, nondippers and reversed, neither BMI, time on hemodialysis, graft survival, eGFR or antihypertensive drugs allowed to distinct the three groups. Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) did not differ between groups but calcification score and ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) were significantly the highest in récipients with reversed rhythm. That was also the case in nondippers recipients. [less ▲]

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See detailHETEROGENOUS CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PRESENTATIONS IN MAD DEFICIENCY
BOEMER, François ULg; SCHOOS, Roland ULg; ACQUAVIVA, Cécile et al

Poster (2013, September)

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See detailCholecaciferol in haemodialysis patients: a randomized, double-blind, proof-of-concept and safety study
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; WARLING, Xavier et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2013), 28(7), 1779-1786

Background. The role of cholecalciferol supplementation in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients has been questioned. The objective of this randomized double-blinded study is to assess whether ... [more ▼]

Background. The role of cholecalciferol supplementation in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients has been questioned. The objective of this randomized double-blinded study is to assess whether cholecalciferol therapy can increase serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels in haemodialysed patients and the safety implications of this therapy on certain biological parameters and vascular calcifications score. Methods. Forty-three haemodialysis patients were randomized to receive placebo or cholecalciferol (25 000 IU) therapy every 2 weeks. The biological parameters, serum calcium, phosphorus, 25(OH)D and parathormone (PTH) levels, were monitored monthly for 12 consecutive months. Vascular calcifications were assessed by lateral X-ray radiography. Results. At baseline, the mean serum 25(OH)D levels were low and similar in both groups. Thirty patients (16 treated and 14 placebo) completed the study: 11 patients died (5 placebo and 6 treated), 1 patient dropped out and 1 patient was transplanted (both from the placebo group). After 1 year, the percentage of 25(OH)D deficient patients was significantly lower in the treated group. None of the patients developed hypercalcaemia. The PTH levels tended to increase over the study period under placebo and to decrease in the cholecalciferol group. The median changes in PTH levels from baseline to 1 year were statistically different between the two groups [+80 (−58 to 153) and −115 (−192 to 81) under placebo and cholecalciferol treatment, respectively, P = 0.02].The calcification scores increased equivalently in both groups (+2.3 per year). Conclusions. Cholecalciferol is effective and safe, and does not negatively affect calcium, phosphorus, PTH levels and vascular calcifications. Additional studies are needed to compare the impacts of nutritional and active vitamin D agents on vascular calcification and mortality. [less ▲]

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See detailMasked hypertension is associated with a high cardiovascular risk in hypertensive kidney transplant recipients
XHIGNESSE, Patricia ULg; Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Poster (2013, June 16)

Objective: High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for graft function in kidney transplant recipients (KTs) Our aim was to evaluate BP control in the office, but also in the ambulatory and home ... [more ▼]

Objective: High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for graft function in kidney transplant recipients (KTs) Our aim was to evaluate BP control in the office, but also in the ambulatory and home settings, in stable KTs, ali treated for hypertension, and to characterize patients with masked hypertension (MHT). Design and Method: Three BP measurement techniques were used in 70 late KT patients, (mean age 56.5 years; 43 males): ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM-Spacelab 90207) office (OBP) and home BP monitoring (HBPM)- (OMRON M6). Carotid­ femoral pulse wave velocity was measured (Sphygmocor) as weil as a calcification score (arteries) and the systolic ankle brachial index (ABI) as recommended. The period since transplantation was 6.9±6.6 years, the mean GFR was 65.6±24±ml/min, Body Mass Index was 25.8±4.7 kg/m2 and the number of antihypertensive drug was 2.1±1 pills/d. Results: Uncontrolled hypertension (HTN) remained frequent in our treated population, 46 % were still hypertensive in the office, 39% using ABPM and 43% with HBPM. The proportion of MHT was 22% whatever the out-of-clinic method used, with more males, more overweight (BMI between, 25-30). lnterestingly when compared with controlled KTs (i.e both OBP and Daytime ABP controlled or both OBP and HBP controlled), using either ABPM or Home BP, patients with MHT had significantly higher PWV, a higher aortic augmentation pressure (AP), a higher calcification score and a higher ABI. However we did not find any significant impact of graft survival, immunosuppressive drugs, smoking habits, diabetes, or alcohol use. Conclusion: A high percentage of uncontrolled HTN was noted by OBP, but also by ABPM and HBPM despite antihypertensive treatment. MHT was frequently observed in KTs. This particular HT subtype, either defined by OBP vs ABPM or by OBP vs HBP, was significantly associated with major markers of arterial stiffness. So, MHT is associated with a high cardiovascular (cv) risk and therefore has to be manage to reduce incidence of cv events and graft loss. [less ▲]

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See detailINFUSION OF THIRD-PARTY MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS (MSC) AFTER KIDNEY AND LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: A PHASE I-II, OPEN-LABEL, CLINICAL STUDY (EudraCT 2011-001822-81 & NCT01429038)
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

Poster (2013, May 30)

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC ... [more ▼]

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC infusion after cadaveric kidney and liver transplantation in a prospective phase I-II study, taking advantage of our centre expertise and experience in MSC use in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation and using an already functioning GMP-compliant laboratory producing clinical-grade MSC. Secondary end-points will help to evaluate the immunosuppressive potential of MSC after organ transplantation, and the opportunity to develop larger randomised, controlled, phase III trials. After successful transplantation, 10 liver and 10 kidney transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (tacrolimus, MMF, steroids) will receive an intravenous infusion of 1.5-3x106/kg of third-party MSC on post-operative day 3±2. These patients will be prospectively compared to 10 liver and 10 kidney recipients who meet the inclusion criteria but deny MSC infusion. Safety will be assessed by recording side effects, including opportunistic infections and cancers. Immunosuppressive potential will be evaluated by rejection episode rates, by graft/patient survivals, by immunohistology of 3-months kidney and 6-month liver graft biopsies and by in vitro evaluation of the immunity profile of the recipients. In a second step, reduction (kidney) and progressive weaning (liver) of immunosuppression will be attempted in recipients who received MSC. This ongoing study is supported by research grants from the CHU of Liège, University of Liège, and by the Senior Clinical Research Grant from ESOT. The first patients were included and treated in early 2012, and final results expected in late 2013. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat's New in Renal and Pancreatic Transplantation in 2011?
WEEKERS, Laurent ULg

in Transplantation Proceedings (2012), 44(9), 27842786

At the 11th meeting of the SFT Congress in Montpellier, several presentations were devoted to humoral rejection of kidney transplants, new immunosuppressive drugs, cancer after transplantation, and second ... [more ▼]

At the 11th meeting of the SFT Congress in Montpellier, several presentations were devoted to humoral rejection of kidney transplants, new immunosuppressive drugs, cancer after transplantation, and second pancreas transplantations. The main information drawn from these papers is summarized in this brief review. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third party mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) after kidney and liver transplantation: a phase I-II, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

Conference (2012, October 19)

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC ... [more ▼]

MSC cells have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aims to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of third party MSC infusion after cadaveric kidney and liver transplantation in a prospective phase I-II study, taking advantage of our centre expertise and experience in MSC use in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation and using an already functioning GMP-compliant laboratory producing clinical-grade MSC. Secondary end-points will help to evaluate the immunosuppressive potential of MSC after organ transplantation, and the opportunity to develop larger randomised, controlled, phase III trials. After successful transplantation, 10 liver and 10 kidney transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (tacrolimus, MMF, steroids) will receive an intravenous infusion of 1.5-3x106/kg of third-party MSC on post-operative day 3±2. These patients will be prospectively compared to 10 liver and 10 kidney recipients who meet the inclusion criteria but deny MSC infusion. Safety will be assessed by recording side effects, including opportunistic infections and cancers. Immunosuppressive potential will be evaluated by rejection episode rates, by graft/patient survivals, by immunohistology of 3-months kidney and 6-month liver graft biopsies and by in vitro evaluation of the immunity profile of the recipients. In a second step, reduction (kidney) and progressive weaning (liver) of immunosuppression will be attempted in recipients who received MSC. This ongoing study is supported by research grants from the CHU of Liège, University of Liège, and by the Senior Clinical Research Grant from ESOT. The first patients were included and treated in early 2012, and final results expected in late 2013. [less ▲]

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See detailUrinary and dietary sodium and potassium associated with blood pressure control in treated hypertensive kidney transplant recipients: an observational study
Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; SOMJA, Mélanie ULg; Gellner, Karen et al

in BMC Nephrology (2012), 13

Background In kidney transplant (Kt) recipients, hypertension is a major risk for cardiovascular complications but also for graft failure. Blood pressure (BP) control is therefore mandatory. Office BP ... [more ▼]

Background In kidney transplant (Kt) recipients, hypertension is a major risk for cardiovascular complications but also for graft failure. Blood pressure (BP) control is therefore mandatory. Office BP (OBP) remains frequently used for clinical decisions, however home BP (HBP) have brought a significant improvement in the BP control. Sodium is a modifiable risk factor, many studies accounted for a decrease of BP with a sodium restricted diet. Increased potassium intake has been also recommended in hypertension management. Using an agreement between office and home BP, the present study investigated the relations between the BP control in Kt recipients and their urinary excretion and dietary consumption of sodium and potassium. Methods The BP control defined by OBP <140/90 mmHg and HBP <135/85 mmHg was tested in 70 Kt recipients (mean age 56 +/- 11.5 years; mean graft survival 7 +/- 6.6 years) treated with antihypertensive medications. OBP and HBP were measured with a validated oscillometric device (Omron M6(R)). The 24-hour urinary sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+) excretions as well as dietary intakes were compared between controlled and uncontrolled (in office and at home) recipients. Non parametric Wilcoxon Mann--Whitney Test was used for between groups comparisons and Fisher's exact test for frequencies comparisons. Pearson correlation coefficients and paired t-test were used when sample size was >30. Results Using an agreement between OBP and HBP, we identified controlled (21%) and uncontrolled recipients (49%). Major confounding effects susceptible to interfere with the BP regulation did not differ between groups, the amounts of sodium excretion were similar (154 +/- 93 vs 162 +/- 88 mmol/24 h) but uncontrolled patients excreted less potassium (68 +/- 14 vs 54 +/- 20 mmol/24 h; P = 0.029) and had significantly lower potassium intakes (3279 +/- 753 vs 2208 +/- 720 mg/24 h; P = 0.009), associated with a higher urinary Na+/K + ratio. Systolic HBP was inversely and significantly correlated to urinary potassium (r = -0.48; P = 0.002), a positive but non significant relation was observed with urinary sodium (r = 0,30;P = 0.074). Conclusions Half of the treated hypertensive Kt recipients remained uncontrolled in office and at home. Restoring a well-balanced sodium/potassium ratio intakes could be a non pharmacological opportunity to improve blood pressure control. [less ▲]

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See detailResults of kidney transplantation from controlled donors after cardio-circulatory death: a single center experience
Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 667

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival ... [more ▼]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post-transplant complications. The influence of delayed graft function (DGF) on graft survival and DGF risk factors were analyzed as secondary end-points. Methods: This is a retrospective mono-center review of a consecutive series of 80 DCD-KT performed at the University Hospital of Sart Tilman, University of Liège, between Jan 2005 and Dec 2011. Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. Results: Overall graft survival was 93.7%, 89.5%, 85% and 81.3% at 3 months, 1 year, 3 and 5 years, respectively. Death-censored graft survival at the corresponding time points was 93.7%, 93.7%, 90.8% and 90.8%. Main cause of graft loss was patient’s death with a functioning graft. No primary non-function grafts were encountered. Renal graft function was suboptimal at hospital discharge, but nearly normalized at 3 months. DGF was observed in 36% of all DCD-KT. DGF significantly increased post-operative length of hospitalization, but had no deleterious impact on graft function or survival. Donor body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2, recipient BMI ≥30 kg/m2 and pre-transplant dialysis duration significantly increased the risk of DGF in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Despite a higher rate of DGF, controlled DCD-KT offers a valuable contribution to the pool of deceased donor kidney grafts, with comparable mid-term results to those procured after brain death. [less ▲]

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See detailDietary and urinary excretion of sodium and potassium associated with blood pressure control in treated hypertensive kidney transplant patients
Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; SOMJA, Mélanie ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2012, April 26)

Abstract Background. In kidney transplant (kt) recipients , hypertension is a major risk for cardiovascular complications but also for graft failure. Blood pressure (BP) control is therefore mandatory ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background. In kidney transplant (kt) recipients , hypertension is a major risk for cardiovascular complications but also for graft failure. Blood pressure (BP) control is therefore mandatory. Office BP (OBP) remains the most frequently used for clinical decisions, however home BP (HBP) have brought a significant improvement in the BP control. Sodium is a modifiable risk factor, many studies accounted for a decrease of BP with a sodium restricted diet. Increased potassium intake has been also recommended in hypertension management. Using an agreement between office and home BP, the present study investigated the relations between the BP control in kt recipients and their urinary excretion and dietary consumption of sodium and potassium. Methods. The BP control defined by OBP <140/90 mmHg and HBP <135/85 mmHg was measured in 70 kt recipients (mean age 56 ± 11.5 years; mean graft survival 7 ± 6.6 years) treated with antihypertensive medications. OBP and HBP were measured with a validated oscillometric device (Omron M6â). 24-hour urinary sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+) excretion as well as dietary intakes (food recall) were compared between controlled and uncontrolled (in office and at home) recipients. Non parametric Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney Test was used for between groups comparisons and Fisher’s exact test for frequencies comparisons. Results. Using an agreement between OBP and HBP, we identified controlled (21%) and uncontrolled recipients (49%). Major confounding effects susceptible to interfere with the BP regulation did not differ between groups, the amounts of sodium excretion were similar (154 ± 93 vs 162 ± 88 mmol/24h) but uncontrolled patients excreted less potassium (68 ± 14 vs 54 ± 20 mmol/24h; P=0.029) and had significantly lower intakes (3279 ± 753 vs 2208 ± 720 mg/24h; P=0.009), resulting in a higher Na+/K+ ratio. Systolic HBP was inversely and significantly correlated to urinary potassium when age, BMI and urinary sodium were controlled (r= -0.46; P=0.002). When age, BMI and urinary potassium were controlled, a positive relation was observed with urinary sodium (P=0.042). Conclusions. Half of the treated hypertensive kt recipients remained uncontrolled in office and at home. Restoring a well-balanced sodium/potassium ratio intakes could be a non pharmacological opportunity to improve blood pressure control. [less ▲]

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See detailDelayed graft function does not harm the future of donation-after- cardiac-death kidney transplants
LeDinh, H; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2012, March 29)

Introduction: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of DGF on post-transplant outcomes in controlled DCD kidney grafts. Patients and Methods: This single-center retrospective study recruited 80 controlled DCD kidney allo- grafts which have been performed at the University Hospital of Sart Tilman, University of Liège, from Jan 2005 to Dec 2011. Results: Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. No primary non-function grafts were encountered. DGF rate was 36%. Overall graft survivals between groups with and without DGF were 92.4% and 95.1% at 1 year, 92.4% and 91.7% at 3 years, and 84.7% and 91.7% at 5 years (p=ns), respectively. Patients with and without DGF had the same survival rates at the corresponding time points (92.4% and 97.1%, 92.4% and 93.7%, and 84.7% and 93.7%, p=ns, respectively). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was significantly lower in DGF group compared to non-DGF group at hospital discharge (29 vs 42 ml/min, p=0.001) and up to 1 year post-transplant (46 vs 53 ml/min, p=0.045), but the differ- ence disappeared afterwards (50 vs 48 ml/min at 3 years, and 54 vs 53 ml/min at 5 years, p=ns). DGF did not increase the risk of acute rejection or surgical complications. 29.6% of recipients with DGF de- veloped acute rejection (biopsy-proven rejection and clinically suspected rejection) compared with 29.2% of recipients without DGF (p=ns). The rate of all surgical complications was 33.3% and 25% in recipients with and without DGF (p=ns). However, DGF prolonged significantly the length of hospitaliza- tion in DGF than non-DGF group (18.9 vs 13 days, p=0.000). Donor BMI 􏰤 30 kg/m2􏰁􏰀􏰚􏰌􏰈􏰏􏰥􏰏􏰌􏰝􏰣􏰀􏰕􏰉􏰂􏰀􏰤 30 kg/m2 and pre-transplant dialysis duration increased the risk of DGF in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: Apart from longer hospital stay, DGF had no deleterious impact on the future of DCD kidney allografts. Comparable graft and patient survival, renal function, rejection rate and surgical com- plications were observed between groups with and without DGF. [less ▲]

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See detailResults of kidney transplantation from controlled donors after cardio-circulatory death: a single center experience.
Ledinh, H.; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Transplant International (2012), 25

The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post-transplant complications. The influence of delayed graft function (DGF) on graft survival and DGF risk factors were analyzed as secondary end-points. This is a retrospective mono-center review of a consecutive series of 59 DCD-KT performed between 2005 and 2010. Overall graft survival was 96.6%, 94.6%, and 90.7% at 3 months, 1 and 3 years, respectively. Main cause of graft loss was patient's death with a functioning graft. No primary nonfunction grafts. Renal graft function was suboptimal at hospital discharge, but nearly normalized at 3 months. DGF was observed in 45.6% of all DCD-KT. DGF significantly increased postoperative length of hospitalization, but had no deleterious impact on graft function or survival. Donor body mass index >/=30 was the only donor factor that was found to significantly increase the risk of DGF (P < 0.05). Despite a higher rate of DGF, controlled DCD-KT offers a valuable contribution to the pool of deceased donor kidney grafts, with comparable mid-term results to those procured after brain death. [less ▲]

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See detailOutcome of the living kidney donor
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; DUBOIS, Bernard ULg et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2012), 27(1), 41-50

Renal transplantation from living kidney donors is still relatively marginal in most of the European countries. However, this source of kidney grafts may help to overcome in part the organ donor shortage ... [more ▼]

Renal transplantation from living kidney donors is still relatively marginal in most of the European countries. However, this source of kidney grafts may help to overcome in part the organ donor shortage of cadaveric donors. The living donor strategy implies correct and objective information about donation risks and completely free acceptance of the living candidate of the donation. In this paper, we reviewed the consequences of kidney donation on the living donor health, considering very short term (linked to the surgery), short term (effect of nephrectomy on glomerular filtration rate) and long term (risk of mortality, chronic kidney disease, proteinuria and hypertension) consequences of kidney donation. [less ▲]

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