References of "Vrolix, Mathias"
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See detailOne-year and longer dual antiplatelet therapy after an acute coronary syndrome: a Belgian position paper.
Sinnaeve, Peter R.; Desmet, Walter; Descamps, Olivier et al

in Acta Cardiologica (2017), 72(1), 19-27

Acute coronary syndrome patients receive DAPT up to one year after their initial event. Exceptions to the guideline-recommended one-year rule, however, are not uncommon. The reasoning behind shorter ... [more ▼]

Acute coronary syndrome patients receive DAPT up to one year after their initial event. Exceptions to the guideline-recommended one-year rule, however, are not uncommon. The reasoning behind shorter treatments, such as unacceptable bleeding risk or urgent surgery, should be well documented in the patient's charts and discharge letter. Based on recent evidence, patients at high risk for repetitive events should continue on low-dose ticagrelor without a significant interruption at one year and indefinitely in the absence of excess bleeding risk. As there is currently no reimbursement, policy makers and insurers should be made aware of the continuing risk and unmet clinical need in this patient population. Nevertheless, many unsolved questions need to be answered, both through additional analyses from recent trials such as PEGASUS-TIMI 54 or DAPT, as well as new carefully designed clinical studies. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of gender difference in hospital outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention. Results of the Belgian Working Group on Interventional Cardiology (BWGIC) registry
LEMPEREUR, Mathieu ULiege; Magne, Julien; Cornelis, Kristoff et al

in EuroIntervention : Journal of EuroPCR in Collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology (2014)

Aims: To determine whether there are gender-based differences in in-hospital outcomes among patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results: We studied a large cohort ... [more ▼]

Aims: To determine whether there are gender-based differences in in-hospital outcomes among patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results: We studied a large cohort using clinical data from a registry of 130,985 PCI procedures in Belgium, from January 2006 to February 2011. Compared to males, females were significantly older (70.3 vs. 64.8 years), and were more frequently diabetic or hypertensive. Men smoked more and more frequently had previous myocardial infarction (MI), previous PCI or previous coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Coronary artery disease (CAD) was less severe in women, and PCI to the left anterior descending artery was more common in female patients. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were higher in females versus males (2.5% for women and 1.6% for men, p<0.0001). After multivariable analysis, female gender remained an independent predictor of mortality (odds ratio 1.35, 95% CI: 1.22-1.49, p<0.0001). Conclusions: Gender-based differences in hospital mortality rates after PCI were observed in this large registry. Female sex remained an independent predictor of mortality after multivariable adjustment. [less ▲]

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See detailCardiopoietic stem cell therapy in heart failure: the C-CURE (Cardiopoietic stem Cell therapy in heart failURE) multicenter randomized trial with lineage-specified biologics.
Bartunek, Jozef; Behfar, Atta; Dolatabadi, Dariouch et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2013), 61(23), 2329-38

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the feasibility and safety of autologous bone marrow-derived and cardiogenically oriented mesenchymal stem cell therapy and to probe for signs of efficacy in ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the feasibility and safety of autologous bone marrow-derived and cardiogenically oriented mesenchymal stem cell therapy and to probe for signs of efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure. BACKGROUND: In pre-clinical heart failure models, cardiopoietic stem cell therapy improves left ventricular function and blunts pathological remodeling. METHODS: The C-CURE (Cardiopoietic stem Cell therapy in heart failURE) trial, a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial, was conducted in patients with heart failure of ischemic origin who received standard of care or standard of care plus lineage-specified stem cells. In the cell therapy arm, bone marrow was harvested and isolated mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to a cardiogenic cocktail. Derived cardiopoietic stem cells, meeting release criteria under Good Manufacturing Practice, were delivered by endomyocardial injections guided by left ventricular electromechanical mapping. Data acquisition and analysis were performed in blinded fashion. The primary endpoint was feasibility/safety at 2-year follow-up. Secondary endpoints included cardiac structure/function and measures of global clinical performance 6 months post-therapy. RESULTS: Mesenchymal stem cell cocktail-based priming was achieved for each patient with the dose attained in 75% and delivery without complications in 100% of cases. There was no evidence of increased cardiac or systemic toxicity induced by cardiopoietic cell therapy. Left ventricular ejection fraction was improved by cell therapy (from 27.5 +/- 1.0% to 34.5 +/- 1.1%) versus standard of care alone (from 27.8 +/- 2.0% to 28.0 +/- 1.8%, p < 0.0001) and was associated with a reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume (-24.8 +/- 3.0 ml vs. -8.8 +/- 3.9 ml, p < 0.001). Cell therapy also improved the 6-min walk distance (+62 +/- 18 m vs. -15 +/- 20 m, p < 0.01) and provided a superior composite clinical score encompassing cardiac parameters in tandem with New York Heart Association functional class, quality of life, physical performance, hospitalization, and event-free survival. CONCLUSIONS: The C-CURE trial implements the paradigm of lineage guidance in cell therapy. Cardiopoietic stem cell therapy was found feasible and safe with signs of benefit in chronic heart failure, meriting definitive clinical evaluation. (C-Cure Clinical Trial; NCT00810238). [less ▲]

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See detailReply: The C-CURE Randomized Clinical Trial (Cardiopoietic stem Cell therapy in heart failURE).
Bartunek, Jozef; Behfar, Atta; Dolatabadi, Dariouch et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2013), 62(25), 2454-6

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See detailOne-year results of coronary revascularization in diabetic patients with multivessel coronary artery disease.Sirolimus stent vs. coronary artery bypass surgery and bare metal stent: insights from ARTS-II and ARTS-I.
Macaya, Carlos; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M.; Colombo, Antonio et al

in EuroIntervention : journal of EuroPCR in collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology (2006), 2(1), 69-76

Background: ARTS-II was designed to evaluate the sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) versus ARTS-I. The objective of this analysis is to assess the safety and efficacy of the SES in diabetic patients with ... [more ▼]

Background: ARTS-II was designed to evaluate the sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) versus ARTS-I. The objective of this analysis is to assess the safety and efficacy of the SES in diabetic patients with multivessel disease (MVD) versus both arms of ARTS-I.Methods and results: The ARTS studies included 367 diabetic patients (ARTS-II: 159; ARTS-I-CABG: 96; ARTS-I-PCI: 112). Baseline characteristics showed a more diseased patient population in the ARTS-II study: 50.3% with 3VD vs. 35.4% (ARTS-I-CABG) and 30.8% (ARTS-I-PCI) (p=0.003). Treated or anastomosed lesions were 3.2+/-1.2 (ARTS-II), 2.8+/-0.8 (ARTS-I-CABG) and 2.5+/-1.1 (ARTS-I-PCI). At 30 days there was a significant difference in MACCE between ARTS-II (4.4%) and ARTS-I-PCI (12.5%) (p=0.02). At 1-year, the death rate was 2.5% (ARTS-II) vs. 3.1% (ARTS-I-CABG) and 6.3% (ARTS-I-PCI) without significant differences. Myocardial infarction rate was 0.6% (ARTS-II) vs. 2.1% (ARTS-I-CABG; p=0.56) and 6.3% (ARTS-I-PCI; p=0.01). The need for repeat revascularization was 12.6% (ARTS-II) vs. 4.2% (ARTS-I-CABG; p=0.027) and 22.3% (ARTS-I-PCI; p= 0.046). MACCE-free survival was 84.3% (ARTS-II) vs. 85.4% (ARTS-I-CABG; p=0.86) and 63.4% (ARTS-I-PCI; p<0.001). Also at 1 year, the overall MACCE rate in patients with diabetes was significantly higher than in nondiabetic patients, 15.7% vs. 8.5%, respectively [RR 1.85, 95%CI (1.16,2.97), p=0.015), due to a higher incidence of death and need for repeat revascularization, 2.5% vs. 0.4 and 12.5% vs. 5.6% in diabetes vs. nondiabetes groups, respectively.Conclusion: Despite more extensive and treated disease, the overall MACCE-free survival in diabetic patients at 1 year in ARTS-II is similar to ARTS-I-CABG. [less ▲]

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