References of "Votion, Dominique"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailDevelopment of an HPTLC method for determination of hypoglycin A in aqueous extracts of seedlings and samaras of Acer species.
Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULiege; Baise, Etienne; Douny, Caroline ULiege et al

E-print/Working paper (2017)

Hypoglycin A (HGA) is a toxin contained in seeds of the sycamore maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus). Ingestion of this amino acid causes equine atypical myopathy (AM) in Europe. Another variety, A. negundo ... [more ▼]

Hypoglycin A (HGA) is a toxin contained in seeds of the sycamore maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus). Ingestion of this amino acid causes equine atypical myopathy (AM) in Europe. Another variety, A. negundo, is claimed to be present where AM cases were reported in the US. For unknown reasons, occurrence of this disease has increased. It is important to define environmental key factors that may influence toxicity of samaras from Acer species. In addition, the content of HGA in seedlings needs to be determined since AM outbreaks, during autumn period when the seeds fall but also during spring when seeds are germinating. The present study aims to validate a reliable method using high performance thin layer chromatography for determination and comparison of HGA in samaras and seedlings. The working range of the method was between 20 μg HGA to 408 μg HGA per ml water, corresponding to 12 - 244 mg/kg fresh weight or 40 - 816 mg/kg dry weight, taking into account of an arbitrary average dry matter content of 30%. Instrumental limit of detection and limit of quantification were of 10 µg HGA/ml and 20 µg HGA/ml water, respectively. Instrumental precision was 4% (RSD on 20 repeated measurements) while instrumental accuracy ranged between 86% and 121% of expected value. The HGA recovery of the analytical method estimated from spiked samaras and seedlings samples ranged between 63 and 103%. The method was applied to 9 samples of samaras from Acer pseudoplatanus, A. platanoides and A. campestre and 5 seedlings samples from A. pseudoplatanus. The results confirm detection of HGA in samaras from A. pseudoplatanus and the absence of detection in samaras of other tested species. They also suggest that detected levels of HGA are highly variable. This confirmed the suitability of the method for HGA detection in samaras or seedling. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (9 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAcylcarnitines profile best predicts survival in horses with atypical myopathy
BOEMER, François ULiege; Detilleux, Johann ULiege; CELLO, Christophe ULiege et al

in PLoS ONE (2017)

Equine atypical myopathy (AM) is caused by hypoglycin A intoxication and is characterized by a high fatality rate. Predictive estimation of survival in AM horses is necessary to prevent unnecessary ... [more ▼]

Equine atypical myopathy (AM) is caused by hypoglycin A intoxication and is characterized by a high fatality rate. Predictive estimation of survival in AM horses is necessary to prevent unnecessary suffering of animals that are unlikely to survive and to focus supportive therapy on horses with a possible favourable prognosis of survival. We hypothesized that outcome may be predicted early in the course of disease based on the assumption that the acylcarnitine profile reflects the derangement of muscle energetics. We developed a statistical model to prognosticate the risk of death of diseased animals and found that estimation of outcome may be drawn from three acylcarnitines (C2, C10:2 and C18 -carnitines) with a high sensitivity and specificity. The calculation of the prognosis of survival makes it possible to distinguish the horses that will survive from those that will die despite severe sign of acute rhabdomyolysis in both groups [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEquine Atypical Myopathy in the UK: Epidemiological characteristics of cases reported from 2011 to 2015 and factors associated with survival
Gonzalez-Medina, S.; Ireland, J. L.; Piercy, R. J. et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2017)

BACKGROUND: Equine atypical myopathy (AM) is a toxic rhabdomyolysis associated with ingestion of hypoglycin A, derived typically in Europe, from Acer pseudoplatanus tree. Despite the wide distribution of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Equine atypical myopathy (AM) is a toxic rhabdomyolysis associated with ingestion of hypoglycin A, derived typically in Europe, from Acer pseudoplatanus tree. Despite the wide distribution of this tree species in the UK, the number of cases reported annually varies, and there has been an apparent increase in prevalence in recent years. Although AM was first recognised in the UK, epidemiological studies have never been conducted focused solely on this country. OBJECTIVES: To describe the spatiotemporal distribution, presentation, treatment and outcome of AM cases reported in the UK. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series. METHODS: British AM cases reported to the atypical myopathy alert website, between 2011 and 2015 were included (n = 224). Data were obtained via standardised epidemiological questionnaires from owners and veterinarians. Factors associated with survival were assessed using logistic regression. RESULTS: Most cases reported were from England (87.9%). Survival was 38.6% (n = 73/189). Clinical factors associated with reduced odds of survival included, hypothermia (odds ratio (OR) 0.18; CI 0.06-0.57; p = 0.01), bladder distension (OR 0.11; CI 0.02-0.59; p = 0.01), tachycardia (OR 0.97; CI 0.94-0.99; p = 0.04) and serum creatine kinase activity >100,000 IU/L (OR 0.17; CI 0.04-0.68; p = 0.01) in the univariable analysis as well as recumbency. The latter was the only sign retained in multivariable analysis (OR = 0.19; CI 0.06-0.62; p = 0.006). Administration of vitamins during the disease was associated with survival (OR 3.75; CI 1.21-11.57; p = 0.02). MAIN LIMITATIONS: Reporting cases to the atypical myopathy alert group is voluntary; therefore, under-reporting will result in underestimation of AM cases; furthermore, direct owner-reporting could have introduced misdiagnosis bias. CONCLUSION: Some areas of the UK reported AM cases more commonly. Clinical signs such as recumbency, rectal temperature, distended bladder and serum CK activity might be useful prognostic indicators though should be considered in the context of the clinical picture. Treatment with vitamins increases survival. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailProceedings of the 3rd FARAH-Day 2016
Bayrou, Calixte ULiege; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULiege; Delguste, Catherine ULiege et al

Book published by Presses de la Faculté de Médecine vétérinaire de l'Université de Liège (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (19 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailMaladie de l'herbe (Dysautonomie Equine ou Equine Grass Sickness ) : une nouvelle étude dans le cadre du RESPE
Tritz, Pierre; Laugier, Claire; Trapprest, Jackie et al

Learning material (2016)

La maladie de l’herbe (MH) (dysautonomie équine, Equine Grass Sickness) est une polyneuropathie qui atteint le système nerveux central et périphérique chez le cheval. Cette maladie d’étiologie inconnue ... [more ▼]

La maladie de l’herbe (MH) (dysautonomie équine, Equine Grass Sickness) est une polyneuropathie qui atteint le système nerveux central et périphérique chez le cheval. Cette maladie d’étiologie inconnue atteint presque exclusivement les chevaux à l’herbe qui développent des symptômes caractéristiques en relation avec une dégénérescence neuronale dans le système nerveux autonome et dans l'innervation intestinale. Les formes aiguës et subaiguës de la maladie sont presque toujours fatales. La maladie est essentiellement décrite dans les iles britanniques et n’a fait l’objet que de très rares études et publications en France dont une étude de la commission maladies infectieuses de l’AVEF. Quelques cas ont été recensés par le RESPE, qui est alerté régulièrement par des vétérinaires ou des propriétaires inquiets, ce qui a conduit le Conseil Scientifique et Technique (CST) du RESPE à relancer une nouvelle étude épidémiologique sur cette maladie en France en collaboration avec le laboratoire de pathologie équine de l’ANSES et l’institut Pasteur (unité des toxines et pathogénie bactériennes, zone anaérobie). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnalysing hypoglycin A, methylenecyclopropylacetic acid conjugates and acylcarnitines in blood to confirm the diagnosis and improve our understanding of atypical myopathy
Votion, Dominique ULiege

in Equine Veterinary Education (2016), doi: 10.1111/eve.12617

Owing to recent methodological validation studies, we have now the opportunity to determine hypoglycin A, methylenecyclopropylacetic acid–carnitine and acylcarnitines concentrations in equine serum. These ... [more ▼]

Owing to recent methodological validation studies, we have now the opportunity to determine hypoglycin A, methylenecyclopropylacetic acid–carnitine and acylcarnitines concentrations in equine serum. These analytes are essential to confirm the diagnosis of atypical myopathy but also to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. In particular, they might help elucidate why some horses seem more resistant to hypoglycin A poisoning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa myopathie atypique des équidés
Votion, Dominique ULiege

E-print/Working paper (2016)

La myopathie atypique est une maladie saisonnière désormais bien présente en France et en Europe. Elle se caractérise par une destruction des muscles posturaux, respiratoires et du myocarde. Des études ... [more ▼]

La myopathie atypique est une maladie saisonnière désormais bien présente en France et en Europe. Elle se caractérise par une destruction des muscles posturaux, respiratoires et du myocarde. Des études récentes ont montré que la cause est une toxine présente dans les graines de certains arbres du genre « Acer » (érable) dont l'Acer pseudoplatanus ou érable sycomore. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAtypical myopathy: an update
Votion, Dominique ULiege

in In Practice (2016), 38(5), 241-246

This article gives an overview of atypical myopathy, discussing the mechanism involved, its aetiology and the clinical signs and management (therapeutic and prevention).

Detailed reference viewed: 119 (28 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDetermination of muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity in Standardbred racehorses as an aid to predicting exertional rhabdomyolysis
Houben, Rosa ULiege; Leleu, Claire; Fraipont, Audrey ULiege et al

in Mitochondrion (2016), 24

This prospective cohort study evaluated the potential of high-resolution respirometry applied to permeabilized muscle fibers for fitness evaluation in French Standardbred racehorses. Fitness evaluation by ... [more ▼]

This prospective cohort study evaluated the potential of high-resolution respirometry applied to permeabilized muscle fibers for fitness evaluation in French Standardbred racehorses. Fitness evaluation by means of respirometric parameters did not correlate with racing performance registered over the following racing season. However, altered mitochondrial energy metabolism was associated with higher risk of developing exertional rhabdomyolysis, a common cause of exercise intolerance in racehorses. These data represent a first step towards establishing reference values for muscle OXPHOS capacity in this breed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (14 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAtypical myopathy in Denmark confirmed with the aTRAQ Assay
Høffer, Sofie Esbjørn; Votion, Dominique ULiege; Anderberg, Marie et al

in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (2016), 47

Atypical myopathy is ais widespread in Europe and has been suspected in Denmark but no cases have been confirmed. This study confirmed cases in this country.

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (10 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMitochondrial function is altered in horse atypical myopathy
Lemieux, Hélène; BOEMER, François ULiege; van Galen, Gaby et al

in Mitochondrion (2016), 30

Equine atypical myopathy in Europe is a fatal rhabdomyolysis syndrome that results from the ingestion of hypoglycin A contained in seeds and seedlings of Acer pseudoplatanus. The hallmark of atypical ... [more ▼]

Equine atypical myopathy in Europe is a fatal rhabdomyolysis syndrome that results from the ingestion of hypoglycin A contained in seeds and seedlings of Acer pseudoplatanus. The hallmark of atypical myopathy consists of a severe alteration in the energy metabolism including a severe impairment in muscle mitochondrial respiration that could contribute to its high death rate [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (21 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailProceedings of the 2nd FARAH-Day / Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (University of Liege - Belgium)
Bayrou, Calixte ULiege; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULiege; Delguste, Catherine ULiege et al

Book published by Presses de la Faculté de Médecine vétérinaire de l’Université de Liège (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (30 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLe syndrome coup de sang
Courouce-Malblanc, Anne; Daix, Charlène; Ferry, Bénédicte et al

E-print/Working paper (2015)

Le coup de sang est un terme utilisé pour nommer une myopathie brutale consécutive à un exercice qui se manifeste cliniquement par des crampes douloureuses et une urine de couleur anormalement foncée du ... [more ▼]

Le coup de sang est un terme utilisé pour nommer une myopathie brutale consécutive à un exercice qui se manifeste cliniquement par des crampes douloureuses et une urine de couleur anormalement foncée du fait de l’élimination de la myoglobine des cellules musculaires détruites (myoglobinurie). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe cause of atypical myopathy has been discovered – what should we do now?
Votion, Dominique ULiege

in Pferdeheilkunde (2015), 31(6), 241-246

This review chronicles the events that led to the discovery of the cause of atypical myopathy (AM). This review answers the question, “How do horses get poisoned in the spring?” and raises the possible ... [more ▼]

This review chronicles the events that led to the discovery of the cause of atypical myopathy (AM). This review answers the question, “How do horses get poisoned in the spring?” and raises the possible role of humidity or other trees in the disease induction. Recent findings that might be of importance to prevent and/or cure AM are also summarised. The paper concludes with the necessity to continue the recording of cases to help horses’ owners prevent AM. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailMyopathie atypique
Votion, Dominique ULiege

in Richard, Eric (Ed.) Maladies des chevaux: diagnostic, traitement, prévention. (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (46 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDetection of hypoglycin A in the seeds of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) and box elder (A. negundo) in New Zealand; the toxin associated with cases of equine atypical myopathy.
McKenzie, R. K.; Hill, F. I.; Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULiege et al

in New Zealand veterinary journal (2015)

CASE HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: During April and May 2014 four horses aged between 5 months and 9 years, located in the Canterbury, Marlborough and Southland regions, presented with a variety of ... [more ▼]

CASE HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: During April and May 2014 four horses aged between 5 months and 9 years, located in the Canterbury, Marlborough and Southland regions, presented with a variety of clinical signs including recumbency, stiffness, lethargy, dehydration, depression, and myoglobinuria suggestive of acute muscle damage. Two horses were subjected to euthanasia and two recovered. In all cases seeds of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) or box elder (A. negundo) were present in the area where the horse had been grazing. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION: The samaras (seeds) of some Acer spp. may contain hypoglycin A, that has been associated with cases of atypical myopathy in Europe and North America. To determine if hypoglycin A is present in the samaras of Acer spp. in New Zealand, samples were collected from trees throughout the country that were associated with historical and/or current cases of atypical myopathy, and analysed for hypoglycin A. Serum samples from the four cases and four unaffected horses were analysed for the presence of hypoglycin A, profiles of acylcarnitines (the definitive diagnosis for atypical myopathy) and activities of creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase. Markedly elevated serum activities of creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase, and increased concentrations of selected acylcarnitines were found in the case horses. Hypoglycin A was detected in the serum of those horses but not in the healthy controls. Hypoglycin A was detected in 10/15 samples of samaras from sycamore maple and box elder from throughout New Zealand. DIAGNOSIS: Cases of atypical myopathy were diagnosed on properties where samaras containing hypoglycin A were also found. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Sycamore and box elder trees in New Zealand are a source of hypoglycin A associated with the development of atypical myopathy. If pastured horses present with clinical and biochemical signs of severe muscle damage then the environment should be checked for the presence of these trees. Horses should be prevented from grazing samaras from Acer spp. in the autumn. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (10 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailQuantification of hypoglycin A in serum using aTRAQ((R)) assay
BOEMER, François ULiege; DEBERG, Michelle ULiege; SCHOOS, Roland ULiege et al

in Journal of chromatography. B, Analytical technologies in the biomedical and life sciences (2015), 997

BACKGROUND: Hypoglycin A has been recently identified has the causal agent of atypical myopathy (AM) in horses. Its identification and quantification in equine's biological fluids is thus a major concern ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Hypoglycin A has been recently identified has the causal agent of atypical myopathy (AM) in horses. Its identification and quantification in equine's biological fluids is thus a major concern to confirm maple poisoning and to provide insight into the poorly understood mechanism of hypoglycin A intoxication. METHODS: Quantification of hypoglycin A has been achieved with the aTRAQ kit for amino acid analysis of physiological fluids (AB Sciex). Acquisition method on mass spectrometer has been updated to record the hypoglycin A specific MRM transition. RESULTS: Outlined accuracy profiles demonstrated very reliable data. A good linearity was observed from 0.09 to 50mumol/L and precision was very good with coefficient of variation below 8%. Fifty-five samples collected from 25 confirmed AM horses revealed significant hypoglycin A concentrations, while toxin was not found in serum of 8 control animals. CONCLUSIONS: The described aTRAQ variant method has been analytically and clinically validated. The reliability of our approach is thus demonstrated into the workup of atypical myopathy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (16 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLes nouveaux outils de diagnostic et de pronostic de la myopathie atypique
Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULiege; BOEMER, François ULiege; Amory, Hélène ULiege et al

in Proceeding de la 41ème Journée de la Recherche équine (2015)

In equines, ingestion of hypoglycin A, a toxin produced in the seeds (samaras) of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) tree alters the energetic metabolism of muscle cells and results in atypical myopathy ... [more ▼]

In equines, ingestion of hypoglycin A, a toxin produced in the seeds (samaras) of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) tree alters the energetic metabolism of muscle cells and results in atypical myopathy (AM). This alterations leads to a characteristic biochemical profile of acylcarnitines (AC) that enables to confirm the diagnosis of AM. This study aims at validating a methodology for the dosage of hypoglycin A in vegetal extracts but also in blood. In addition, the biochemical profile in AC has been determined in AM cases (5 survivors and 13 deceased) and in 5 horses suffering from exercise-induced myopathy. The AC profiles of these horses have been compared to the one of healthy horses (n = 35). This study showed that hypoglycin A was present in seeds and spring seedlings of sycamore and also in blood of AM cases horses. In addition, the establishment of AC profile contributes to the diagnostic and helps to assess the prognosis of AM cases. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 222 (47 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailProceedings of the 1st FARAH-Day Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (University of Liege - Belgium)
Bayrou, Calixte ULiege; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULiege; Delguste, Catherine ULiege et al

Book published by Presses de la Faculté de Médecine vétérinaire de l’Université de Liège (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (27 ULiège)