References of "Vivas Romero, Maria"
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See detailEntre mutation et métissage Co-construction d’une ethnographie émancipatrice et féministe
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

in Émulation Revue des Jeunes Chercheuses et chercheurs en sciences sociales (in press)

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See detailMore than just ‘friends’? Locating migrant domestic workers’ transnational Voluntary Kin relationships
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

in Journal of Family Studies (2017)

The author explores the practices through which migrant domestic workers established Transnational Voluntary Kin relations with individuals who are non-blood or law-related. Transnational Voluntary Kin ... [more ▼]

The author explores the practices through which migrant domestic workers established Transnational Voluntary Kin relations with individuals who are non-blood or law-related. Transnational Voluntary Kin are intimate relationships, which alleviate migrants’ reproductive needs by replacing, overlapping or complementing traditional family support. Drawing from Braithwaite, Bach, Baxter, Hosek, & Wolf [(2010). Constructing family: A typology of Voluntary Kin. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 27(3), 388–407] four relationships are explored. Firstly, there are ‘More than family’ Kin that replace the care of absent or dead family members. Secondly, there are ‘Just like Family’ Kin that replace the care of physically proximate relatives unable to perform their roles. Thirdly, there are ‘Whenever needed it’ Kin that replace or overlap traditional kin aid in particular situations. Fourthly, there are ‘In law or extended’ Kin constructed through the marriage of traditional kin. Data are drawn from a multi-sited ethnography with Peruvian-Colombian migrant domestic workers and their Transnational Voluntary or Traditional kin. The analysis contributes both to the constructivist sociology of the family and transnational family studies where these relationships remain underexplored. [less ▲]

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See detailSteering social fields of mobilization in global cities: Latin American transnational political engagement in Brussels
Lara Guerrero, Larisa; Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

Conference (2017, November 15)

Social scientists and migration scholars have a growing interest in how and why migrants engage in transnational political movements in both their home and host countries. Migrants are active agents ... [more ▼]

Social scientists and migration scholars have a growing interest in how and why migrants engage in transnational political movements in both their home and host countries. Migrants are active agents participating in transnational social movements. They create, transform, and exploit transnational networks to engage in political movements in their homeland and in their hostland from cities. This chapter aims to answer the following questions: how do global cities shape transnational fields of social mobilization? What is the nexus between these transnational fields of social mobilization and access to welfare states? Theoretically, this contribution introduces a new spatial level of analysis to unpack the dynamics and dimensions of migrant social movements organized in global cities. By focusing specifically on the city of Brussels, this contribution analyzes the impact of global cities shaping the capacity and desire of Latin American migrants in engaging in political movements. Empirically, this chapter presents two case studies where Latin Americans living in Brussels engage in political transnational activities to change their living conditions both in their host and home cities. These examples illustrate the role of migrants influencing and shaping welfare-state and political systems in both their sending and receiving societies. [less ▲]

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See detail“Who Cares for those who Cared? Global Social Protection Arrangements Between Europe and Latin America”.
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

Conference (2017, November 09)

Belgium recently experienced an economic and political crisis. This context has reinforced the historical restrictive migratory approach while promoting policies that aim at restraining migration through ... [more ▼]

Belgium recently experienced an economic and political crisis. This context has reinforced the historical restrictive migratory approach while promoting policies that aim at restraining migration through the control of social provisions. In such an environment migrant families are categorized as an intolerable burden for the state (Lafleur and Stanek forthcoming). Evidently, these measures affected migrant family’s access to health-care, education, pension schemes and increased their unemployment rates (Castanheira et al. 2014; Pignal 2012). Nevertheless, it also drove them to diversify their resources to access social protection while negotiating them in sending, receiving and in-between countries. This paper tackles this last argument and explores the post-crisis strategies Peruvian and Colombian migrant families use to access global social protection arrangements while negotiating their access to informal and formal resources in a variety of countries in Europe and Latin America. Nonetheless, it also depicts emerging or transforming inequalities in their strategies. Global Social Protection arrangements are defined as strategies that migrants learn to put together through their life course to cope with social risks in areas such as: health-, long-term care, pensions or unemployment. Such strategies combine rights based in public welfare policies as well as market-family and community based practices. An intersectional lens (Anthias 2001) is used to explore how Andean transnational families’ ethnic, class, gender, generational positioning’s affects their strategies. The empirical data use draws from a multi-sited ethnography conducted with 15 Andean Transnational family networks over the past two years. [less ▲]

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See detailWho Cares for Those Who Cared? An Intersectional Ethnography of Global Social Protection Arrangements
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2017)

How and through which repertoires of practices do migrant domestic workers access global social protection? And how do their gender, race, class, and generational positioning along with their ... [more ▼]

How and through which repertoires of practices do migrant domestic workers access global social protection? And how do their gender, race, class, and generational positioning along with their transnational family relations affect this access? This dissertation deals with these questions and focuses on the case of Peruvian and Colombian Migrant Domestic Workers in the city of Brussels. Such migrants share a paradoxical positioning as they contribute productively and reproductively to the development of their receiving and sending societies but experience a lack of formal and informal social protection on both sides. This analysis first maps through a multi-sited ethnography the repertoire of practices they use to strategize their access to Social Protection in the areas of: 1- old-age and survivors benefits, 2- incapacity, 3- health & family, 4- active labor market programs, 5- unemployment, 6-housing, and education, 7- community and family support. Secondly, it theorizes these practices as Global Social Protection Arrangements that are simultaneously made out of transnational interpersonal relationships and formal support systems. Thirdly, building from the work of Anthias (2016) a Translocations lens is used to analyze how these actor’s gender, race, class, religious and generational positioning within the global reproduction of labor as well as within their transnational family networks simultaneously affect the functionality of such arrangements. Concluding, it’s argued that more privileged migrant domestic workers will use arrangements composed mostly of formal resources, while less privileged ones will see formal avenues less open to them and therefore have to rely on an informal arrangement. Far, from the rights based normative approach to social protection, this thesis provides a glance at how transnational access to social protection is strategize across borders. Furthermore, it’s relevant in a context of increasing human mobility where inequalities in access to social protection emerge as a public transnational social question (Faist, 2016) that is suitable both for academics and policy makers. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of Gender, Race, and Class in Transnational Political Movements: Mexican and Colombian Women Engaging in Homeland Politics from Europe’s Capital
Lara-Guerrero, Larisa; Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

Conference (2017, June 30)

Drug trafficking is a mounting security problem in Latin America, specifically for the primary producers of narcotics in the region: Mexico and Colombia. The security concern from both countries has ... [more ▼]

Drug trafficking is a mounting security problem in Latin America, specifically for the primary producers of narcotics in the region: Mexico and Colombia. The security concern from both countries has triggered the political and social mobilization of Mexican and Colombian migrants from abroad many of them from the Global City of Brussels. This paper unpacks the motivations and dynamics behind transnational political activism organized by Mexican and Colombian women living in Brussels. By integrating and revising insights from social movements theories, political transnationalism from migration studies and intersectionality studies, this paper elaborates on the role of migrant women organizing and sustaining transnational political movements to change the political conditions of their countries of origin. The ethnographic evidence presented in this paper reveals the importance to recognize the individual level in the analysis of transnational movements. Women are cognitive actors with political ideals and emotions whose political activism is highly influenced by social categorizations such as gender, race, class, and generation. [less ▲]

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See detailTracing Transnational and intersectional inequalities in immigrants families’ access to social protection: The case of Andean families’ in Brussels
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

Scientific conference (2017, June 29)

Immigrants and family members in the home and host urban spaces often experience inequalities in access to social protection (Faist, 2016, Amelina, 2017). Focusing on healthcare, we demonstrate that ... [more ▼]

Immigrants and family members in the home and host urban spaces often experience inequalities in access to social protection (Faist, 2016, Amelina, 2017). Focusing on healthcare, we demonstrate that immigrant families today respond to healthcare needs of family members here and there through four cross-border strategies. We show that Andean transnational family networks based in Brussels select and articulate these different strategies to assemble transnational health care arrangements. The arrangements we follow are based in the urban area of Brussels but are connected to other urban spaces in southern Europe and Latin America in which migrants have developed networks of informal and formal support. Using an intersectional approach, we argue that heterogeneity markers such as gender, race, class and levels of transnational engagement determine the choice between different types of arrangements (Mahler et al. 2015). We support our argument with multi-sited (Marcus, 1995) ethnographic data collected with 48 members of 10 Andean transnational family members during fieldwork in Belgium, Colombia and Peru. [less ▲]

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See detail"Exploring Experiences of Inequality in European Urban Centers: Towards an Intersectional and Transnational Approach."
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege; Ramos, Cristina

Conference (2017, June 28)

What strategies do migrants living in European cities use to challenge inequalities in access to healthcare, participation in the labor market and the creation of social support networks? The papers in ... [more ▼]

What strategies do migrants living in European cities use to challenge inequalities in access to healthcare, participation in the labor market and the creation of social support networks? The papers in this panel aim to respond to this question by drawing from transnational and intersectional approaches conceptualizing inequalities as sets of relationships between people and broader structures in which interactions generate better opportunity for some more than for others (Tilly, 2000). Panel participants consider that these interactions and the benefits that can be obtained through migration are affected by various social categories such as gender, class, sexual identity, transnational connections, and citizenship. Intersectional approaches allow to examine how these axes of inequality (Crenshaw, 1989; Anthias, 2001) simultaneously affect migration outcomes and also how they operate differently according to the geographical space in which they develop: origin and host societies as well as transnationally. Nonetheless, the papers presented in this panel will also emphasize migrants’ agency to resist or conform to the inequalities they face. Overall, this panel aims to contribute to the study of migration and inequality at the conceptual and methodological levels. At the theoretical level, the panel will build on new debates on the reproduction of intersectional inequalities in transnational settings (Faist, 2016, Amelina, 2017). At the methodological level, all paper presenters have use multi-sited ethnographic methods (working in cities such as Madrid, London, Milan, Brussels and Frankfurt) and will therefore use the panel as an opportunity to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of such method. [less ▲]

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See detailSolidarité intergénérationnelle chez les migrantes sud-américaines
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege; Piddiu, Luca

in Voix Solidaires (2017), 22(été 2017), 14-16

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See detailTracing Migrant-Mothers’ ‘Return’ Narratives in the Mexico-U.S and Peru-Belgium Migratory Circuits.
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege; Sanchez-Martinez, Anabela

in Travaux et recherches dans les amériques du centre (2017)

How do contemporary migrant mothers strategize return to their home countries? And how does the social protections available for their bi-national children in sending and destination countries factor in ... [more ▼]

How do contemporary migrant mothers strategize return to their home countries? And how does the social protections available for their bi-national children in sending and destination countries factor in the decision to return? Through this contribution, we aimed to tackle these questions. We draw from the analysis of two longitudinal migratory careers and argue that our participant’s return decisions were influenced both by their children’s effective access to social protection and their subjective perceptions of ‘good-motherhood’. This Trans-Atlantic comparison shows how different situated-institutional-contexts, cultures of care and motherhood resulted into different patterns of mobility for these women and their families. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a new vision on power relations inside fieldwork: Like Haraway's Mutated Witness
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

Scientific conference (2016, October 03)

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See detail“Who Cares for Those Who Cared? Ethnography on Ageing Migrant Domestic Workers Negotiations for Social Protection “
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

Scientific conference (2016, July 12)

How and through which practices do Ageing Migrant Domestic Workers negotiate their access to social protection across borders? How are these negotiations influenced both by their intersecting gender, race ... [more ▼]

How and through which practices do Ageing Migrant Domestic Workers negotiate their access to social protection across borders? How are these negotiations influenced both by their intersecting gender, race, class, generational standpoints and their transnational family relations? This contribution deals with these questions and focuses on the case of Peruvian and Colombian Ageing Migrant Domestic Workers in the city of Brussels. Such migrants share a paradoxical positioning as they contribute productively and reproductively to the development of their receiving and sending societies but experience a lack of formal and informal social protection on both sides. This analysis first maps through a moving ethnography the practices they use to negotiate their access to Social Protection in the areas of: 1- access to labor, 2- social security entitlement and portability, 4- housing and 3- informal symbolic-practical care. Secondly, it theorizes these practices as an assemblage of social protection that’s simultaneously made out of transnational interpersonal relationships and formal support systems. Thirdly, building from the work of Amelina et al, (2012) Transnational and Intersectional lens are used to analyze how the effectiveness of such assemblage is simultaneously affected by these actor’s gender, race, class and generational positioning within the global reproduction of labor as well as by their transnational family relations. Concluding, it’s argued such assemblage of protection increases ageing migrants’ life chances but reproduces and produces social- inequalities at the local, transnational and global level. This contribution provides a glance at how transnational needs for social protection are negotiated across borders. Furthermore, it’s relevant in a context of increasing human mobility where inequalities in access to social protection emerge as a public transnational social question that is relevant both for academics and policy makers. [less ▲]

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See detailMore than just friends? The role of voluntary kin relationships on ageing migrant domestic workers' access to social protection
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

Conference (2016, July 11)

The feminization of migration led to an academic interest on female migrant domestic worker’s transnational obligations as mothers and family members. Less emphasis has been placed on their own needs in ... [more ▼]

The feminization of migration led to an academic interest on female migrant domestic worker’s transnational obligations as mothers and family members. Less emphasis has been placed on their own needs in terms of care and social protection, particularly in their ageing life period. This contribution makes a case for assessing the role of transnational voluntary kin relationships on ageing-migrant-domestic-worker access to social protection. Transnational voluntary kin relationships are defined as family-type relationships, based not on blood or law association but rather on voluntary agreements. It’s argued that migrants access to transnational voluntary kin relationships depends on their intersectional positioning and replace, overlap or complement traditional family support. These relationships are a social capital that facilitates access to social protection in the areas of labor, social security entitlement, housing and informal practical-symbolic care. Through the analysis emphasis is first placed on how migrants intersectional gender, class, ethnic, generational positioning within the welfare, gender, care, and migration-labor regimes of sending and receiving societies, determines their needs and access to such relationships. Subsequently, the role of two instrumental voluntary kin relationships in migrants access to social protection are explored, meaning: 1- Substitute Voluntary Kin that intervenes when blood or law type family members are dead, underperformed their roles or there are ongoing conflicts, 2- Supplemental Voluntary Kin that intervene when traditional family members that reside in physical or non-physical proximity are unable to perform their roles. Data draws from the life-stories of 8 Peruvian-Colombian ageing migrant domestic workers residing in Brussels and 45 semi-structured interviews with their voluntary and traditional transnational kin residing in various geographical locations. This contribution aims to improve the knowledge on emerging nontraditional family support systems that help to alleviate the reproductive and productive needs of transnational ageing individuals in modern societies. [less ▲]

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See detailUne nouvelle division international du travail de soin
Vivas Romero, Maria ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

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