References of "Vermeulen, Cédric"
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See detailEntandrophragma cylindricum (Sprague) Sprague (Meliaceae), une espèce ligneuse concurrentielle en Afrique centrale (synthèse bibliographique)
Tabi Eckebil, Paule ULg; Verheggen, François ULg; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2017), 21(1), 80-97

Introduction. De nos jours, la gestion des ressources forestières ne se focalise plus sur l’exploitation exclusive du bois d’oeuvre, mais prend également en considération les produits forestiers non ... [more ▼]

Introduction. De nos jours, la gestion des ressources forestières ne se focalise plus sur l’exploitation exclusive du bois d’oeuvre, mais prend également en considération les produits forestiers non ligneux. Entandrophragma cylindricum (Sprague) Sprague, de son nom commercial « sapelli/sapele », de la famille des Meliaceae, illustre parfaitement cette situation. Le présent article fait un état de l’art des connaissances concernant E. cylindricum et présente quelques informations sur la chenille qui lui est inféodée. Littérature. Le sapelli est une des espèces ligneuses les plus exploitées d’Afrique centrale pour son bois d’oeuvre. Il est répandu dans la forêt dense humide semi-caducifoliée du domaine guinéo-congolais. C’est une espèce semi-héliophile, son mode de dispersion est anémochore et sa phénologie est régulière. Selon la sylviculture appliquée, sa croissance en diamètre peut atteindre jusque 0,82 cm par an. Cette essence est également l’hôte d’une espèce de chenille comestible riche en protéines, I. oyemensis Rougeot. Fortement appréciée par les populations locales, cette chenille fait également l’objet d’un commerce régional et international. Enfin, l’écorce du sapelli est reconnue pour son intérêt ethnobotanique, particulièrement en médecine traditionnelle. Conclusions. Les informations tirées de la littérature ont permis de mettre en évidence certaines lacunes relatives à l’écologie et au mode de reproduction de cette espèce et, ceci, en dépit de son importance pour le commerce du bois. De plus, les inconnues quant à la productivité et la saisonnalité des chenilles d’Imbrasia oyemensis sur cet arbre nécessitent de développer des recherches complémentaires pour garantir la durabilité de l’exploitation simultanée de la ressource ligneuse et non ligneuse et pour proposer des modes de gestion concertés entre exploitants industriels et populations locales. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a community-based concession model in the DRC
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Karsenty, Alain

in International Forestry Review (2017)

In 2014 Decree 14/018 laying down the rules for granting forest concessions to local communities, followed by Ministerial Order 0/25 on the same issue, was published in the DRC. This paper aims to analyse ... [more ▼]

In 2014 Decree 14/018 laying down the rules for granting forest concessions to local communities, followed by Ministerial Order 0/25 on the same issue, was published in the DRC. This paper aims to analyse the abovementioned legislation with respect to participatory management of forests. The explicit recognition of the duality of a customary de facto local community forest and a modern legal entity (concession) is an innovation. However, viewed from the perspective of the long-established habits within the country, the question remains whether these legal measures can be sufficient for ensuring the sustainable development of these community-held forested areas. Allowing community concessions up to 50,000 ha demonstrated a shift in the government policy away from the industrial timber cultivation model. However, an area this size is much larger than the communities can monitor, particularly in the case of artisanal charcoal or wood exploitation. [less ▲]

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See detailA look at Intact Forest Landscapes and their relevance to Central African forest policy
Haurez, Barbara ULg; Daïnou, Kasso ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg et al

Conference (2017, February)

Tropical forests are important providers of natural resources and ecosystem services but their ecological functions are facing increasing human pressure, linked to economic development. The preservation ... [more ▼]

Tropical forests are important providers of natural resources and ecosystem services but their ecological functions are facing increasing human pressure, linked to economic development. The preservation of tropical forest ecosystems is interrelated with effective land use planning and identification of priority areas for conservation. Initially defined by Greenpeace and the World Resources Institute (WRI) in 2000, Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) are large areas of forest minimally impacted by human activities. IFLs were identified by mapping industrial activities, road networks and infrastructure using remote sensing. Since 2014, when IFLs were recognized and adopted by the certification scheme Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), the IFLs have become integrated into forest management policies. In order to trace the history and evaluate the applicability of IFLs for forest management policy in the Central African context, we searched for documents related to the IFL method, and previous similar concepts. The IFL method is simple and cost-effective and enables the monitoring of forest degradation at a global scale. However, the approach mainly considers forest cover and is imprecise at the local scale. For example, hunting, one of the main threats faced by Central African ecosystems, cannot be detected by satellite imagery and is therefore disregarded in IFL identification processes. In contrast, there are other considered anthropogenic activities, such as reduced-impact selective logging, which may be compatible with forest ecosystem conservation. To better tailor the IFL approach to Central African forests, we recommend (i) the consideration of wildlife communities distribution in the analysis of disturbance, (ii) a thorough evaluation of the impacts of different human activities on forest ecosystems, and (iii) the integration of local stakeholders and governments in the design of land management strategies devised to address social, economic and environmental needs. [less ▲]

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See detailDeforestation and timber production in Congo after implementationof sustainable management policy: A reaction to the article by J.S.Brandt, C. Nolte and A. Agrawal (Land Use Policy 52:15–22)
Karsenty, Alain; Romero, Claudia; Cerutti, Paolo Omar et al

in Land Use Policy (2017), 65

tThis viewpoint paper presents a reaction to the article by Brandt et al. (2016). It highlights the complexitiesinherent to the attribution of deforestation impacts to policy interventions when using ... [more ▼]

tThis viewpoint paper presents a reaction to the article by Brandt et al. (2016). It highlights the complexitiesinherent to the attribution of deforestation impacts to policy interventions when using remote-sensingdata. This critique argues that in the context of the Congo a suite of factors (i.e., population density inparticular) other than those considered by Brandt et al. (e.g., type of forest, distance from roads and mar-kets) play essential roles in determining the fates of forests. It also contends that care is needed whenmaking decisions regarding which units will be included in the comparison group so that contextual fac-tors and on-the-ground information are properly considered (e.g., when logging operations are inactiveor when a concession is used for ‘conservation’ purposes). Finally, it proposes that a focus on an analysisof deforestation rates for a given level of timber production might be a metric that more accurately rep-resents one aspect of the consequences of forest management, which should also consider the appraisalof trade-offs associated with a larger set of social, financial and ecological objectives. [less ▲]

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See detailA look at Intact Forest Landscapes and their relevance in Central African forest policy
Haurez, Barbara ULg; Daïnou, Kasso ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg et al

in Forest Policy and Economics (2017), 80

Tropical forests are major providers of natural resources and ecosystem services but their ecological functions are at threat, due to increasing human pressure linked to economic development. The ... [more ▼]

Tropical forests are major providers of natural resources and ecosystem services but their ecological functions are at threat, due to increasing human pressure linked to economic development. The identification of priority areas for conservation is crucial for land use planning to ensure the protection of biodiversity and ecological function. Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs), as defined by Greenpeace and World Resources Institute (WRI), are areas of the forest ecosystems not subjected to human activities. They have beenidentified by mapping human disturbances through remote sensing. Contrary to similar global-scale concepts, IFLs have been integrated into the standards of the certification body Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and therefore have practical implications for forest management policies. The Motion 65, approved in the general assembly of FSC in 2014, mandates the protection of IFLs located in FSC certified logging concessions. Until the implementation of national standards, forestry operations are banished from 80% of the IFL area within each forest management unit. To trace the history and evaluate the suitability of IFLs in the Central African context, we searched for documents related to the IFL method, and related approaches focusing on the identification of areas devoid of human disturbances. The IFL method is simple and cost-effective and allows for a global assessment of the influence of human infrastructures and industrial exploitation on forests However, the method does not consider the situation below the canopy and those forest components not visible by satellites. For example, hunting, one of the main threats faced by wildlife in Central African forests today, cannot be detected with satellite imagery. On the other hand, other anthropogenic activities which remote sensing may detect may be compatible with forest ecosystem conservation. To better tailor the IFL approach to Central African forests, we recommend (i) the consideration of wildlife communities in the intactness analysis, (ii) a thorough evaluation of the impacts of human activities on forest ecosystems, and (iii) the integration of local stakeholders and governments in the design of land management strategies to respond to social, economic and environmental needs [less ▲]

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See detailUse of Unmanned Aerial System to assess wildlife (Sus scrofa) damage to crops (Zea mays)
Michez, Adrien ULg; Morelle, Kevin; Lehaire, François et al

in Journal of Unmanned Vehicle Systems (2016), 4(4)

Damage caused by ungulates to agricultural areas are difficult to evaluate because the real extent of the damage remains usually poorly described and potentially arising conflicts. Recent advances in ... [more ▼]

Damage caused by ungulates to agricultural areas are difficult to evaluate because the real extent of the damage remains usually poorly described and potentially arising conflicts. Recent advances in unmanned aerial system (UAS) provide new versatile mapping and quantification possibilities in a wide range of applications. We used crop fields (Zea mays) damaged by wild boar (Sus scrofa) and compared the extent of the damage by means of three methods: i) traditional ground-based assessment ii) UAS orthoimages with operator delineation and iii) UAS Crop Height Model with automatic delineation based on height threshold. We showed for the first time that UAS could be applied for assessing damage of ungulates to agriculture. The two methods using UAS imagery provide coherent and satisfactory results and trended to underestimate the damage area when compared to in-use ground-based field expertise. However we suggest that performance of UAS should further be tested in variable conditions in order to assess the broad application of this tool. Our study describes the potential of UAS as a tool for estimating more accurately the damage area and subsequently the compensation costs for wildlife damage. The proposed approach can come in support of local and regional policies for the definitions of compensation for farmers. [less ▲]

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See detailHautes Valeurs de Conservation (HVC) dans les Unités Forestières d'Aménagement du Cameroun : concepts, choix et pratiques
Daïnou, Kasso ULg; Bracke, Charles; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg et al

Book published by Presses Agronomiques de Gembloux (2016)

Le système de certification FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) vise à promouvoir la gestion durable des forêts. Il repose sur un ensemble de normes dont une est particulièrement complexe à mettre en oeuvre ... [more ▼]

Le système de certification FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) vise à promouvoir la gestion durable des forêts. Il repose sur un ensemble de normes dont une est particulièrement complexe à mettre en oeuvre en Afrique Centrale, le principe 9 traitant des Hautes Valeurs de Conservation (HVC). Ce principe devrait être interprété aux échelons nationaux afin de prendre en compte les spécificités de chaque pays. Bien que des ouvrages aient déjà été élaborés par diverses organisations, aucun ne cible particulièrement les grandes concessions forestières. Au Cameroun, ces concessions ou Unités Forestières d’Aménagement (UFA), représentent pourtant 40 % du domaine forestier national. Le présent guide ambitionne de fournir aux acteurs de la gestion forestière au Cameroun les connaissances les plus pertinentes afin de leur permettre d’identifier, de gérer et de suivre les Hautes Valeurs de Conservation dans les UFA. Il se démarque des précédents guides par plusieurs points : (i) une revue bibliographique détaillée est fournie sur le sujet épineux de l’identification de chaque HVC, et l’opinion des auteurs y est mise en exergue; (ii) la démarche d’identification est appuyée par les références les plus pertinentes, évitant au gestionnaire de se disperser dans sa quête de documentation; (iii) sur la base de leur expérience, les auteurs proposent une série de menaces pouvant affecter les HVC, de mesures de gestion et d’indicateurs de suivi. L’approche développée se base sur des méthodes empiriques et pragmatiques d’une part et, d’autre part, sur des études scientifiques. Cet ouvrage devrait constituer une base intéressante pour une interprétation solide des HVC au Cameroun. De plus, bien que ciblant les UFA camerounaises, il pourrait inspirer d’autres acteurs forestiers œuvrant dans le Bassin du Congo. [less ▲]

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See detailHabitat use of an unstudied Lepilemur in the northwest Madagascar: L. mittermeieri
Wilmet, Leslie ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Beudels-Jamar et al

Conference (2016, August)

Biodiversity and endemism is very high in Madagascar and Genus Lepilemur is part of the endemic mammalian fauna of the island. Sportive lemurs have small distribution ranges, fairly small total ... [more ▼]

Biodiversity and endemism is very high in Madagascar and Genus Lepilemur is part of the endemic mammalian fauna of the island. Sportive lemurs have small distribution ranges, fairly small total populations and are particularly negatively affected by deforestation and habitat fragmentation, serious threats for the biological diversity of the island. Our research focus on one poorly-known taxon, Lepilemur mittermeieri. The distribution range of this endangered species is restricted to the Ampasindava peninsula in the northwest Madagascar and ecological information is essential for its preservation. The main objective of our study is to analyze habitat use and niche characteristics of the species and the impact of habitat degradation and fragmentation on these parameters in order to design robust conservation guidelines for the Ampasindava peninsula. In this talk, we will present the project as a whole and results of two 4-months field missions conducted in 2015 and in 2016. These field missions were designed to specifically 1)compare home range size between two sites 2)complete forest characterization of the home range of several radio-collared individuals. The methodology includes the monitoring of 16animals equipped with radio-collar (VHS telemetry) during 6hours per night for a number of days, GPS locations being recorded every 10 minutes. The home range is derived from the telemetry observation through MCP method. [less ▲]

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See detailPlace of customary rights mapping initiatives in conservation policies
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Karsenty, Alain

Conference (2016, June 20)

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See detailHuman in the forest: Long-term interactions, lifestyle and ecosystem services in Central Africa
Gillet, Pauline ULg; Lhoest, Simon ULg; Morin-Rivat, Julie et al

Poster (2016, May 20)

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See detailHow Bees Deter Elephants: Beehive Trials with Forest Elephants (Loxodonta africana cyclotis) in Gabon
Ngama, Steeve ULg; Korte, Lisa; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2016), 11(5), 12

In Gabon, like elsewhere in Africa, crops are often sources of conflict between humans and wildlife. Wildlife damage to crops can drastically reduce income, amplifying poverty and creating a negative ... [more ▼]

In Gabon, like elsewhere in Africa, crops are often sources of conflict between humans and wildlife. Wildlife damage to crops can drastically reduce income, amplifying poverty and creating a negative perception of wild animal conservation among rural people. In this context, crop-raiding animals like elephants quickly become “problem animals”. To deter elephants from raiding crops beehives have been successfully employed in East Africa; however, this method has not yet been tested in Central Africa. We experimentally examined whether the presence of Apis mellifera adansonii, the African honey bee species present in Central Africa, deters forest elephants (Loxodonta Africana cyclotis) from feeding on fruit trees. We show for the first time that the effectiveness of beehives as deterrents of elephants is related to bee activity. Empty hives and those housing colonies of low bee activity do not deter elephants all the time; but beehives with high bee activity do. Although elephant disturbance of hives does not impede honey production, there is a tradeoff between deterrence and the quantity of honey produced. To best achieve the dual goals of deterring elephants and producing honey colonies must maintain an optimum activity level of 40 to 60 bee movements per minute. Thus, beehives colonized by Apis mellifera adansonii bees can be effective elephant deterrents, but people must actively manage hives to maintain bee colonies at the optimum activity level. [less ▲]

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See detailEmbargo on Lion Hunting Trophies from West Africa: An Effective Measure or a Threat to Lion Conservation ?
Bouché, Philippe; Crosmary, William; Kafando, Pierre et al

in PLoS ONE (2016), 11(5), 0155763

The W-Arly-Pendjari (WAP) ecosystem, shared among Benin, Burkina Faso and Niger, represents the last lion stronghold of West Africa. To assess the impact of trophy hunting on lion populations in hunting ... [more ▼]

The W-Arly-Pendjari (WAP) ecosystem, shared among Benin, Burkina Faso and Niger, represents the last lion stronghold of West Africa. To assess the impact of trophy hunting on lion populations in hunting areas of the WAP, we analyzed trends in harvest rates from 1999 to 2014. We also investigated whether the hunting areas with higher initial hunting intensity experienced steeper declines in lion harvest between 1999 and 2014, and whether lion densities in hunting areas were lower than in national parks. Lion harvest rate remained overall constant in the WAP. At initial hunting intensities below 1.5 lions/1000km2, most hunting areas experienced an increase in lion harvest rate, although that increase was of lower magnitude for hunting areas with higher initial hunting intensity. The proportion of hunting areas that experienced a decline in lion harvest rate increased at initial hunting intensities above 1.5 lions/1000km2. In 2014, the lion population of the WAP was estimated with a spoor count at 418 (230–648) adults and sub-adult individuals, comparable to the 311 (123–498) individuals estimated in the previous 2012 spoor survey. We found no significant lion spoor density differences between national parks and hunting areas. Hunting areas with higher mean harvest rates did not have lower lion densities. The ratio of large adult males, females and sub-adults was similar between the national parks and the hunting areas. These results suggested that the lion population was not significantly affected by hunting in the WAP. We concluded that a quota of 1 lion/1000km2 would be sustainable for the WAP. Based on our results, an import embargo on lion trophies from the WAP would not be justified. It could ruin the incentive of local actors to conserve lions in hunting areas, and lead to a drastic reduction of lion range in West Africa. [less ▲]

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See detailQuelles sont les causes de la déforestation dans le bassin du Congo ? Synthèse bibliographique et études de cas
Gillet, Pauline ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Feintrenie, Laurène et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016), 20(2), 183-194

Les forêts du Bassin du Congo font partie des zones forestières les mieux préservées de la planète. Néanmoins, les facteurs qui entrainent la déforestation ailleurs dans le monde se manifestent également ... [more ▼]

Les forêts du Bassin du Congo font partie des zones forestières les mieux préservées de la planète. Néanmoins, les facteurs qui entrainent la déforestation ailleurs dans le monde se manifestent également dans cette sous-région du globe. Cet article propose une revue de la littérature des causes directes et des facteurs sous-jacents de la destruction du couvert forestier des régions tropicales, afin de mettre en exergue les moteurs de la déforestation dans le bassin du Congo, et plus particulièrement au Cameroun et au Gabon. Littérature. Les causes directes de déforestation, définies comme ayant un lien cause-conséquence immédiat avec la destruction du couvert forestier, sont renforcées par des facteurs sous-jacents tels que les facteurs économiques, les avancées technologiques, les mesures politiques ainsi que les pressions démographiques. Toutes ces causes interagissent de façons distinctes dans les différentes régions tropicales de par le monde et expliquent les divergences et similitudes entre les dynamiques de déforestation régionales. En plus de l’expansion de l’infrastructure, du développement du secteur minier et de l’extraction du bois, l’agriculture représente la cause directe de déforestation la plus importante dans le bassin du Congo. Au Cameroun, la déforestation actuelle est principalement liée à l’agriculture. Le plan d’émergence de ce pays prévoit le développement des infrastructures, la modernisation de l’appareil de production national ainsi que l’exploitation minière. Au Gabon, le taux de déforestation plus faible s’explique par la dynamique agricole et l’ouverture des routes. Le plan d’émergence ambitieux y prévoit la modernisation de l’infrastructure ainsi que le développement de l’agriculture agro-industrielle. Conclusions. Une mutation des socio-écosystèmes liée à la déforestation est attendue en différents points du bassin du Congo. Les recherches futures devraient maintenant aborder la description de socio-écosystèmes types représentant les différents stades de la transition forestière ainsi que l’identification des facteurs du changement à différentes échelles. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Are the Impacts of Deforestation on the Harvest of Non-Timber Forest Products in Central Africa?
Gillet, Pauline ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Forests (2016), 7(5),

The objective of the study is to evaluate the impact of forest transition on non-timber forest product (NTFP) harvesting in Central Africa. We analyze the evolution of several parameters, including ... [more ▼]

The objective of the study is to evaluate the impact of forest transition on non-timber forest product (NTFP) harvesting in Central Africa. We analyze the evolution of several parameters, including distance from NTFP harvest site to road, proportion of dietary intake and villagers’ incomes. The research is based on field surveys, participatory mapping and the geolocation of activities in three study sites representing different stages along the Mather’s forest transition curve: (i) intact forest; (ii) partially degraded forest; and (iii) small areas of degraded forest with plantations of useful trees. The results show that the maximum distance from harvest site to road is higher in Site 2 compared to Site 1 as a consequence of a lower availability of NTFPs; and that this distance is significantly lower in Site 3 due to a drastically smaller village territory. The diversity of bushmeat decreases as game evolves from large to small species, commensurate with the progression of forest transition. As a consequence, there is also a reduction in the proportion of these products represented both in household dietary intake and cash income. This analysis establishes a strong link between the Mather’s forest transition curve and a decline in the importance of NTFPs in village production and livelihoods. [less ▲]

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See detailPotentiel des véhicules aériens sans pilote dans la détection des activités humaines illégales dans les aires protégées en République Démocratique du Congo
Semeki Ngabinzeke, Jean; Linchant, Julie ULg; Quevauvillers, Samuel ULg et al

in Journal of Unmanned Vehicle Systems (2016), 4

The recent advent of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in natural resource management opens new opportunities to help protected area managers fighting against various human pressures. The Falcon UAV was ... [more ▼]

The recent advent of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in natural resource management opens new opportunities to help protected area managers fighting against various human pressures. The Falcon UAV was used for 15 missions to help detect human activities in Garamba National Park and its surrounding game reserves (Gangala na Bodio, Mondo Missa) in the North-Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. A Sony Block camera coupled with a Tamarisk thermal camera was used to record videos, whereas photos were acquired with a Sony Nex7 digital camera. Tests showed that it was possible to detect precise objects using the Falcon UAV. Houses, fields, bare ground patches, burned areas, roads and tracks were easily detectable and identified in the videos at a flight altitude of up to 250 m AGL. Artisanal gold mining sites (size ≤ 0.21 ha) are also recognizable on the video and still images. Improvements are needed, notably in photo overlap and georeferencing, but the system shows great potential to ensure detection and continuous surveillance of human activities within protected areas. [less ▲]

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